ID needed-butt plate

Megalops

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Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Hello, this is my first post here.
I was recently metal detecting a shoreline close to Charleston Harbor, SC and found this brass butt plate. My knowledge of military weapons if limited but I believe that the musket/rifle had a military use because there is a number (94) stamped on the top of it. Could this have been a rack number?

As you can see the weapon had a patch box in the stock as evidenced by the notched area on the right side. The notched area is 1 3/8 inches long at the widest point.

In addition to the number on the top outside edge there is either a "22" or inverted "55" stamped on the inside, along with a "C" and a symbol similar to the letter "u".

I have no idea if the musket/rifle is from the Civil War period, or is it is older. Any help identifying the type/model number of the gun and possibly an explanation of the stamped marks would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for the add and I look forward to reading your comments.
Glenn
 

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Megalops

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Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Thanks everybody for the welcomes and input-keep 'em coming. Does anyone know what the stamped numbers and symbols mean?
 

Don Dixon

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Joined
Oct 24, 2008
Location
Fairfax, VA, USA
Given what was imported into America by the Federals and Confederates, the conclusion that the buttplate came from a Muster 1844 Kammerbüchse (manufactured between 1844 and 1847) is reasonable/likely. The two Muster 1844s that I have in my collection are both later variants and don't have the tool ("patch") box, so I can't take measurements. It appears that either very few of the weapons with tool boxes were imported, or that the survival rate was very small.

I was going to post a photograph of a Muster 1844, with tool box, in the Springfield Armory collection, but the system says that its too large. Sorry about that. It is one of only a couple with tool boxes that I have seen in the States.

The marks on the inside of the buttplate are manufacturer's/assembly marks. The "94" on the top, exterior of the buttplate is probably a unit rack number. That was one of the Austrian Army's standard locations for unit markings.

Regards,
Don Dixon
 
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James N.

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Welcome to the forums from the host of the Stonewall Jackson Forum and another gun enthusiast!
 

Megalops

Cadet
Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Given what was imported into America by the Federals and Confederates, the conclusion that the buttplate came from a Muster 1844 Kammerbüchse (manufactured between 1844 and 1847) is reasonable/likely. The two Muster 1844s that I have in my collection are both later variants and don't have the tool ("patch") box, so I can't take measurements. It appears that either very few of the weapons with tool boxes were imported, or that the survival rate was very small.

I was going to post a photograph of a Muster 1844, with tool box, in the Springfield Armory collection, but the system says that its too large. Sorry about that. It is one of only a couple with tool boxes that I have seen in the States.

The marks on the inside of the buttplate are manufacturer's/assembly marks. The "94" on the top, exterior of the buttplate is probably a unit rack number. That was one of the Austrian Army's standard locations for unit markings.

Regards,
Don Dixon

Thank you very much Don. So what is the likelihood that the rifle was used in the Civil War, and if so would it have been used by the Union or Confederate army?
 

Don Dixon

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 24, 2008
Location
Fairfax, VA, USA
Thank you very much Don. So what is the likelihood that the rifle was used in the Civil War, and if so would it have been used by the Union or Confederate army?

In the Civil War, fairly likely. By which Army...

The Federal Army purchased and used something in excess of 25,000 Muster 1844 and 1849 Kammerbüchse (so called "Garibaldi" rifles), primarily in the west.

Other than the 100,000 Muster 1854 System Lorenz rifles acquired through Major Huse's efforts for the Confederates, documenting what Austrian weapons that the Confederates officially purchased and ran through the blockade is very difficult. There is very little documentation on southern state purchases and private ventures. And then, there is the stuff the Confederates captured and re-used.

In balance it probably originated with the Federals, but.....

Regards,
Don Dixon
 
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Megalops

Cadet
Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Thank you again, Don-I appreciate your insight. At least I now know the type of rifle that it was and that it was likely used in the Civil War. That's close enough for me!
 
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