Home weaponry displays

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OldSarge79

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Jul 12, 2017
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You mean the revolver holsters? How did you learn that provenance? That is amazing!
I posted a thread on those items a couple of months ago. It should answer all questions. The story really pulled me.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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That is an amazing and sad story. Oddly, I was just in White Sulpher Springs this past June and in Poolsville a few months earlier. I'm glad these items have a good home now and were well taken care of and treasured earlier.
 

Texas Johnny

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OldSarge79

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Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
There is no such thing as a bad Civil War collection!
I completely agree.
It really aught to be about enjoying your own collection, learning about your "items," the challenge of the hunt and the satisfaction of "scoring" a find. Even with one Civil War item, you have a piece of history in your hands. It's nice to see what others have, but, like this thread has done for me, they only serve to give me ideas and to learn from.....and maybe dream a little.
 

FiremarshalBill

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Feb 4, 2016
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I really like your minie ball display, well done! How are they attached? I want to do something similar, but not sure what the best way is to attach the bullets.
Most of the minie balls are held on with 6 lb test fishing line against green felt and tied from the back. There are a couple that I had to use a tiny bit of hot glue but I don't recommend that for most displays.
 

JPChurch

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Dec 30, 2016
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Manassas VA
I collect Massachusetts Militia items, so some of my stuff is pre-Civil War. The red coat is circa 1845 Boston National Lancers. It came with the red and blue enlisted man epaulets and Civil War era belt. (The coats were used for years. ) I subsequently found the epaulets as used by the Captain and another for lesser officers, and they are displayed below the coat. To the left is an 1833 Dragoon saber with brass scabbard as used by the Lancers. The hanging tailed jacket is a circa 1850 jacket used by a Massachusetts Militia officer. Prior to standard uniform regulations, the militia laws called for simply a blue coat. This officer had his dressed up with gold bullion tape. The placement of buttons helped determine rank. The double row of 7 means a major or colonel if I recall the regulations correctly. I also have 3 other uniforms not depicted. Thanks for asking.
Both sides of my family served in various Mass. militia units over the centuries. Beginning with the Indian war waged against "King Phillip," the Revolutionary war, War of 1812 and the Civil War. Send me a message and I'll be happy to share what info I have.
 

bobinwmass

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Jul 14, 2019
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Both sides of my family served in various Mass. militia units over the centuries. Beginning with the Indian war waged against "King Phillip," the Revolutionary war, War of 1812 and the Civil War. Send me a message and I'll be happy to share what info I have.
My family also back to 1638. My 9th great grandfather Capt Isaacc Johnson was killed in the Great Swamp Fight leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett fort December 19, 1675.
 

James N.

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Both sides of my family served in various Mass. militia units over the centuries. Beginning with the Indian war waged against "King Phillip," the Revolutionary war, War of 1812 and the Civil War. Send me a message and I'll be happy to share what info I have.
My family also back to 1638. My 9th great grandfather Capt Isaacc Johnson was killed in the Great Swamp Fight leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett fort December 19, 1675.
scan0012.jpg
 

bobinwmass

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Thank you James N. The monument photo brings back memories. Only learning of my ancestor's history several years ago I visited the site on the 340th anniversary of the battle and his death. Very eerie being all alone there in the middle of the woods feeling unseen eyes watching you. Depending on your point of view it was considered either a great victory or a massacre. I had to leave behind two bunches of flowers, one for each side.
 

gjpratt

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Apr 14, 2019
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Perhaps the result of being raised in Petersburg, Va., surrounded by the history, and collecting for more years than I care to remember. I finally built on a wing to the house for my accumulation. Functionality being the goal, I switched to vertical racks long ago as they increased the number of guns in a particular space. I've posted a few photos before, but just took these... The guns propped up in the corners are indicative that it's time to sell a few {or add another partition}. :unsure:

The long wall; from colonial to WWII including all the Federal stuff I still have.
View attachment 323696

The rest is CSA, grouped by states.
View attachment 323697

Colts in the center, the rest mostly CS single shots.
View attachment 323698

CS swords are the only thing horizontal inside this alcove. Here's one wall ... and...Yes, out of space again !!!

View attachment 323699
Your display looks like a contemporary photo of the Sanitary Fair Exhibitions.
 

JPChurch

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Manassas VA
My family also back to 1638. My 9th great grandfather Capt Isaacc Johnson was killed in the Great Swamp Fight leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett fort December 19, 1675.
Very Cool, my ancestor Abiel Lamb was at the Great Swamp Fight also..........he may have served under Johnson. Abiel survived and I'm here to tell about it. That was nasty occurrence. Terrible slaughter...……... King Phillip was cut up into pieces once he was captured. In fact the Roxbury Company sounds real familiar to me since you mentioned it!!!!! The Lamb family came over on one on Winthrop's vessels early 1630's. Small world indeed!!!
 
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Joined
Sep 28, 2013
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Mississippi
I'd like to see some pics of some quality HOME displays. No store displays, no picnic table spreads, no "line 'em up on the floor and take a pic" displays. I really want to see some actual well thought out home displays, either in your man cave or home office or den. Have you dedicated a room that others can "ooh and ahh?" Show us how artistic you all are when it comes to displaying your wares! Are your muskets hung? Do you have them on stands or framed? I'd have posted this under contemporary photos, but it's all about the weapons and how you show them. Let's see it!
Well, in no way can I ever claim to be a woodworking craftsman, but I am rather proud of my first attempt at creating a display base for a Confederate version of a Bormann case-shot shell recovered at Shiloh.

I started with a standard unfinished wooden base from the local hobby shop.
Much like this one:


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I then spent quite a bit of money for a large drilling attachment for my little Dremel tool.
To my amazement, it worked perfectly.

Perfect fit for my projectile !

I then stained and varnished the base.
However, I did order an engraved plate to describe everything.
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These efforts were over ten years ago.

But My shell is still 'on duty' as a bookend !



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:smile coffee:
 
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