Help understanding muster roll abstract

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
I have been trying to find whatever records there are on my 3rd great Grandfather, John J Vandebogart 120th NY regiment, and I was able to find this muster roll abstract. I am not sure what all the dates mean so I am hoping someone might be able to offer some insight. I also am wondering if there is anywhere to find hospital records? It says he was in the hospital in Philadelphia. I wish there was a way to find those details. I hope this picture is somewhat legible. Thank you for any help!

download.png
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
* OFFICIAL *
CWT PRESENTER
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Chickamauga 2018
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Hello @Jclynn911 and welcome to CivilWarTalk - the best place on the internet for Civil War discussion. You've come to the right place! I can help with interpreting some of the information from the register and I'm sure there are others who will be able to help with finding the Hospital records from Philadelphia for November 1862.
1611725308926.png

On August 18, 1862, at age 24, John J. Vanderbogart enlisted as a Private into the 120th New York Infantry at Kingston, for three years. He was mustered into service on August 22, 1862 and assigned to Company I, 120th New York Infantry. He was noted on the Company Muster Roll as absent in the hospital at Philadelphia November 1, 1862 (to April 10, 1863?)

He was listed as present on the Company Muster Roll as of April 30, 1863 [meaning he had returned to his regiment.] The Company Muster rolls show him absent, serving in Battery K, 4th US Artillery December 31, 1863 through April 30, 1865. [So even though he enlisted in the 120th New York, he served most of the war in Battery K, 4th US Artillery.] The last notation in that row of dates says he was absent sick in Genl. Hospital, probably at the time the April 30, 1865 Company Muster Roll was completed.

Underneath that, it notes that John J. Vanderbogart was born in Woodstock, NY. At the time of his enlistment, he was 24 years old and, by occupation, a farmer. He had grey eyes, brown hair, a light complexion, and was 5 feet 8 1/2 inches tall.

Back near the top, under "Left the Organization" the notes indicate that he was discharged in 1865 [date not give] under General Orders No. 77 and that "No discharge was furnished." [I don't know what General Orders No. 77 said, but someone else will likely be along who does.]

Again, welcome to CivilWarTalk. Happy to have you aboard.

EDIT TO ADD: Looks like your John J Vanderbogart may have also served in Company C, 20th New York State Militia 100 Days 1861. The 20th Regiment, New York State Militia (100 days, 1861) was organized for three months' service April 23, 1861. The regiment mustered out August 2, 1861.
1611726767247.png
 
Last edited:

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
Thank you for the nice welcome and thank you for clarifying that for me. Yes he did serve 100 days with 20th NYSM maybe they were at the first battle of Bull Run... I am currently reading the 120th Regiment NYSV a narrative of its services it does mention that on November 1st the sick were sent to the hospital but to be the hospital from November to April seems a long time. I wonder if he left the hospital and then possibly received furlough because I do know that after Burnside was relieved of command in January 1863 that Hooker came and really turned the army around giving out furloughs out and such..
 

Bob Velke

Private
Official Vendor
Joined
Jan 25, 2014
Carded Medical Records may reflect his time in the hospital. His service and pensions files may make reference to it too. All three can be obtained from the National Archives in D.C. (when it opens after COVID).

He applied for a pension in 1890 and it was approved - which suggests that he had a permanent disability but it was not as a direct result of his service. His wife, Hannah, applied after his death in 1906 and she received a pension too. They would be be bound together in one file at NARA. She died 28 Feb 1922.

Pension index cards from FamilySearch.org:
32959_033150-03587.jpg
32959_033150-03586.jpg
 
Last edited:

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
Carded Medical Records may reflect his time in the hospital. His service and pensions files may make reference to it too. All three can be obtained from the National Archives in D.C. (when it opens after COVID).

He applied for a pension in 1890 and it was approved - which suggests that he had a permanent disability but it was not as a direct result of his service. His wife, Hannah, applied after his death in 1906 and she received a pension too. They would be be bound together in one file at NARA. She died 28 Feb 1922.

Pension index cards from FamilySearch.org:View attachment 389348View attachment 389349
Thank you, that is very helpful! Would it be safe to say that any records on John J Vandebogart in the war would be at the NARA in Washington DC? And is there anything someone has to do prior to their visit and to view those type of records? I have looked all over the internet and would definitely go to the NARA just to be sure I have found all that I can on my Grandfather.. Thank you again!
 

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
I have also been trying to find a muster roll of battery K 4th US artillery. I have found absolutely no records for that unit. Does anyone know if there are detailed battery reports? I am trying to find any record on John J Vandebogart in that unit but to no avail. I have only seen mention of him in battery K 4 US on his 120th regiment muster roll.
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
* OFFICIAL *
CWT PRESENTER
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Chickamauga 2018
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Thank you, that is very helpful! Would it be safe to say that any records on John J Vandebogart in the war would be at the NARA in Washington DC? And is there anything someone has to do prior to their visit and to view those type of records? I have looked all over the internet and would definitely go to the NARA just to be sure I have found all that I can on my Grandfather.. Thank you again!
I would suggest that you contact member @RhinehartRoots He makes trips to the National Archives regularly and is a professional researcher. He can obtain color copies of the records for you for a nominal fee.
 

RhinehartRoots

Private
Official Vendor
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Thanks for tagging me in this @lelliott19. I'll be happy to help you figure this out @Jclynn911. You've gotten some good advice from people on this thread already, but if you have specific questions about how to get this at NARA, either in person on your own or through me, I can answer whatever you need. I've worked with several members of this forum to get their information for them over the last several years.

Yes, those pension files are at the National Archives in DC, along with his service records. NARA is closed now because of the pandemic, but when they reopen, I imagine it'll be a busy place! If you live locally and go there in person yourself, you don't have to do much in advance. Make sure you have copies of those pension index cards before you go. You can look them up there again, but you can save time by bringing those images with you. They have the file numbers right on it that you'll need to request those pension files. Take your phone or a digital camera so you can have digital copies of the pages once you get them (as long as you don't use the flash, you'll be fine).

If you're not local or don't have the time to get there, let me know and I can get them for you too.

--Brian
 

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
Thanks for tagging me in this @lelliott19. I'll be happy to help you figure this out @Jclynn911. You've gotten some good advice from people on this thread already, but if you have specific questions about how to get this at NARA, either in person on your own or through me, I can answer whatever you need. I've worked with several members of this forum to get their information for them over the last several years.

Yes, those pension files are at the National Archives in DC, along with his service records. NARA is closed now because of the pandemic, but when they reopen, I imagine it'll be a busy place! If you live locally and go there in person yourself, you don't have to do much in advance. Make sure you have copies of those pension index cards before you go. You can look them up there again, but you can save time by bringing those images with you. They have the file numbers right on it that you'll need to request those pension files. Take your phone or a digital camera so you can have digital copies of the pages once you get them (as long as you don't use the flash, you'll be fine).

If you're not local or don't have the time to get there, let me know and I can get them for you too.

--Brian
Yes, everyone here is great! I live up in NY so not very local unfortunately. I would be interested in going through you. I would love to go down there but realistically it would be easier and faster for me to go through you (when they do decide to reopen). Are there more records accessible going to the NARA than what I have found on the internet e.g fold and ancestry?
 

RhinehartRoots

Private
Official Vendor
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
Yeah, this is a really helpful forum, overall. There's usually no shortage of good help here.

Yes, there is a LOT more at the National Archives than what you've found online already. In fact, you really don't have anything yet except for those pension cards. Those are simply index cards, telling you that there are complete files at the National Archives for him. Those pension files can be quite large-- an average size would be around 75 pages. Some are shorter, some are much larger. That entire pension file is about him and/or his widow.

There are compiled military service records there for him too. He will likely have carded medical records too, since you said he was hospitalized. So there should be a lot of information there that is only available in person there.

If you're interested in hiring me to help you get them, we can talk in a private message and work out the details.

--Brian
 

Jclynn911

Cadet
Joined
Jan 19, 2021
Yeah, this is a really helpful forum, overall. There's usually no shortage of good help here.

Yes, there is a LOT more at the National Archives than what you've found online already. In fact, you really don't have anything yet except for those pension cards. Those are simply index cards, telling you that there are complete files at the National Archives for him. Those pension files can be quite large-- an average size would be around 75 pages. Some are shorter, some are much larger. That entire pension file is about him and/or his widow.

There are compiled military service records there for him too. He will likely have carded medical records too, since you said he was hospitalized. So there should be a lot of information there that is only available in person there.

If you're interested in hiring me to help you get them, we can talk in a private message and work out the details.

--Brian
Wow that is so nice to hear! I am so psyched that you were tagged! You will definitely be getting a message from me! Thank you and thank you so much for making the connection @lelliott19 😃
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
Thank you for the nice welcome and thank you for clarifying that for me. Yes he did serve 100 days with 20th NYSM maybe they were at the first battle of Bull Run... I am currently reading the 120th Regiment NYSV a narrative of its services it does mention that on November 1st the sick were sent to the hospital but to be the hospital from November to April seems a long time. I wonder if he left the hospital and then possibly received furlough because I do know that after Burnside was relieved of command in January 1863 that Hooker came and really turned the army around giving out furloughs out and such..
Welcome to CWT.
 

Bob Velke

Private
Official Vendor
Joined
Jan 25, 2014
Thank you, that is very helpful! Would it be safe to say that any records on John J Vandebogart in the war would be at the NARA in Washington DC? And is there anything someone has to do prior to their visit and to view those type of records? I have looked all over the internet and would definitely go to the NARA just to be sure I have found all that I can on my Grandfather.. Thank you again!
To be clear for others reading, John J. Vandebogart's records are all at NARA in D.C. but that's not the case for every Civil War soldier.

If you decide to go to D.C., then let me know and perhaps I can meet you there and walk you through the process of pulling those records. I'm local and I'm there several times a week (when it is open) as suggested by my signature.
 
Top