Critiquing the Gettysburg Address


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frontrank2

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#5
And on the other side of the coin:
"We pass over the silly remarks of the President. For the credit of the nation we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall be dropped over them, and that they shall be no more repeated or thought of."
The Union and Patriot - newspaper based out of Harrisburg, Pa.

lincoln-gettysburg.jpg
 
#6
"We pass over the silly remarks of the President. For the credit of the nation we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall be dropped over them and that they shall be no more repeated or thought of."
November 24, 1863 Harrisburg Patriot and Union (PA.) newspaper

On November 14, 2013 the newspaper retracted their Gettysburg Address comments made 150 years prior.

Edit - did not realize frontrank had already posted this same comment.
 
#7
"The Lord's Prayer is 66 words, the Gettysburg Address is 286 words, there are 1.322 words in the Declaration of Independence, but government regulations on the sale of cabbage total 26.911 words. The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable and literature is not read."
Oscar Wilde

I don't agree at all with this but...
"The only thing wrong with Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address was that it was the South, not the North, that was fighting for a government of the people, by the people and for the people."
H.L. Mencken
 
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#8
The Lords Prayer is exactly that and not composed by mere man. The Declaration was a composition of many men's input . Sale of cabbage I won't go there. Not saying the Lord's Prayer and the Declaration are not great also. This started out about the Gettysburg Address and opinions on it.
Regarding Mencken opinion, we could banter till the cows come home and would not get it resolved.
I know you have to break some eggs to make an omelet.
 

frontrank2

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#9
" The cheek of every American must tingle with shame as he reads the silly, flat, and dish-watery utterances of the man who has to be pointed out to intelligent foreigners as President of the United States."

Attributed to The Chicago Times, following President Abraham Lincoln’s address at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863.—Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years, vol. 2, p. 472 (1939); no date of issue for the Times is given.

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#10
"The Lord's Prayer is 66 words, the Gettysburg Address is 286 words, there are 1.322 words in the Declaration of Independence, but government regulations on the sale of cabbage total 26.911 words. The difference between literature and journalism is that journalism is unreadable and literature is not read."
Oscar Wilde

I don't agree at all with this but...
"The only thing wrong with Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address was that it was the South, not the North, that was fighting for a government of the people, by the people and for the people."
H.L. Mencken
H.L. Mencken's assessment is the most foolish critique of the Gettysburg Address posted in this thread so far.
Considering H.L. Mencken's views on race (he was a white supremacist), I'm not surprised however to read that he was also indifferent to how a Confederate victory would have impacted the rights of 4 million black Americans.
 
#13
"The President and the Cabinet were there, with famous soldiers and civilians. The oration by Mr. Everett was smooth and cold. Delivered, doubtless, with his accustomed graces, it yet wanted one stirring thought, one vivid picture, one thrilling appeal.
"The few words of the President were from the heart to the heart. They can not be read, even, without kindling emotion. 'The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.' It was as simple and felicitous and earnest a word as was ever spoken. "
Harper's Weekly, November 21, 1863
 



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