Lt.Arty Confederate 2-pounder mountain rifles.

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I am reading Fields of Blood by William L. Shea. The use of 2-pounder mountain rifles of Capetian John c. Shoup's Arkansas Battery is mentioned. I am not sure I have heard of a 2-pounder mountain rifle. Perhaps I have seen then called by a different name. I checked Warren Ripley's Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War and did not find a 2-pounder mountain gun.
 
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DixieRifles

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I'm familiar with a 1.5635-inch Williams Gun breech loader. It was erroneously referred to as a 2-lb and also a 10-ounce cannon. It would match the description of a 10-ounce but I don't know why they called it a 2-lb. Only 42 were made for the Confederate Army.

Where did Shoup's Arkansas Battery see action? Western Theater? West of Mississippi River?

Williams Gun.JPG
 

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Trans Mississippi. Even for a mountain rifle, a 1.5635-inch is on the small size.
 

Rusk County Avengers

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I am reading Fields of Blood by William L. Shea. The use of 2-pounder mountain rifles of Capetian John c. Shoup's Arkansas Battery is mentioned. I am not sure I have heard of a 2-pounder mountain rifle. Perhaps I have seen then called by a different name. I checked Warren Ripley's Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War and did not find a 2-pounder mountain gun.

They were Tredegar 2.25in Mountain Rifles. out of the twenty made four made it to the Trans-Mississippi. A famous user, and hater of them was John S. Mosby, whose gun is on display in Oklahoma City.

"2-pounder" is a big misnomer. I literally just bought blueprints to them, and have been searching for those guns that were sent to Arkansas for years.

http://steencannons.com/cannons/tredegar-mountain-rifle-bronzeiron/
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/tredegar-2-25-inch-mountain-rifles-in-the-trans-mississippi.144697/
And my book review for Shea's book. Its a good one.

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/fields-of-blood-the-prairie-grove-campaign.160805/
 

Rusk County Avengers

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I'm familiar with a 1.5635-inch Williams Gun breech loader. It was erroneously referred to as a 2-lb and also a 10-ounce cannon. It would match the description of a 10-ounce but I don't know why they called it a 2-lb. Only 42 were made for the Confederate Army.

Where did Shoup's Arkansas Battery see action? Western Theater? West of Mississippi River?

View attachment 361252

They were formed shortly before the Prairie Grove Campaign in Arkansas, and disbanded soon after. Complaints of the mountain guns they had were ineffective, and there were transfers of officers and so on. Hughey's Battery was more or less its successor and they had bigger guns.
 

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They were Tredegar 2.25in Mountain Rifles. out of the twenty made four made it to the Trans-Mississippi. A famous user, and hater of them was John S. Mosby, whose gun is on display in Oklahoma City.

"2-pounder" is a big misnomer. I literally just bought blueprints to them, and have been searching for those guns that were sent to Arkansas for years.

http://steencannons.com/cannons/tredegar-mountain-rifle-bronzeiron/
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/tredegar-2-25-inch-mountain-rifles-in-the-trans-mississippi.144697/
And my book review for Shea's book. Its a good one.

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/fields-of-blood-the-prairie-grove-campaign.160805/

Warren Ripley's Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War does talk about this rifle.
 

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William L. Shea never call the Confederate 2-pounders as anything bu 2-pounders. He does call the Union 2-pounders Williams guns.
 

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The Williams Gun was made by the Confederates.
i would like to the account about the gun in the Union army.

I went back and re read the passage in Fields of Blood by William L. Shea and I made a mistake. I said Williams guns by the book says Woodruff guns. I apologize for my mistake and any confusion it caused. I had never heard of a 2-pounder Woodruff mountain gun. I wonder if the 2-pounders use by the Confederates at Prairie Grove were captured 2-pounder Woodruffs?

Page 211 Fields of Blood, The Prairie Grove Campaign by William L. Shea. "The Illinois regiment was equipped with carbines and a battery of four 2-pounder Woodruff guns Two of the guns closed to within one hundred yards of the Confederate position and came under a "terrible fire" that wounded two artillery men, One gun was immobilized when when its team was killed, but Lieutenant James. M Simeral and twenty troopers of the First Iowa dashed froward on foot and dragged it to safety. Moments later all four Woodruff's open fire with canister."

So how effective is canister from a 2-pounder Woddruff gun? Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War by Warren Ripley does give a bit of information on 2-pounder Woodruff mountain guns say it was a little used steel 2-pounder with which weighted 140 pounds. "sole reference to its use found thus far in Brown's book on the Grierson Raid (p. 177 Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War by Warren Ripley). Well Fields of Blood by William L. Shea must be a second reference to its use. Due it the small size, it would not appear that canister from a 2-pounder would contain too many balls. More like a really large shotgun?

http://turnerbrigade.org/history/woodruff/
 
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DixieRifles

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So how effective is canister from a 2-pounder Woddruff gun? Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War by Warren Ripley does give a bit of information on 2-pounder Woodruff mountain guns say it was a little used steel 2-pounder with which weighted 140 pounds. "sole reference to its use found thus far in Brown's book on the Grierson Raid (p. 177 Artillery and Ammunition of the Civil War by Warren Ripley). Well Fields of Blood by William L. Shea must be a second reference to its use. Due it the small size, it would not appear that canister from a 2-pounder would contain to many balls. More like a really large shotgun?
Ahh. That explains it. No worry about the mistake---you got me really curious.

Maybe it wasn't canister---rather a bucket of scrap metal. Did they make a canister round for it? The description of the Williams Gun made you believe it got the attention of the average soldier who was out it the open. The sound alone made them stop to figure out what was firing at them. In one case, they hit the ground.
 

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