Bvt. Maj.Gen. John H. King

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Transcribed from my recent wikipedia-article.

John Haskell King (February 19, 1820 – April 7, 1888) was a United States Army officer who fought in the Mexican-American War and in the American Civil War. A regular soldier with a career span of 45 years; he distinguished himself in the civil war as commanding officer of Regular Army detachments in the Western Theater.

John Haskell King was born in Sackets Harbor, New York, on February 19, 1820. In his adolescent years he moved to his relative Colonel Hugh Brady in Michigan, where the later was in command of Fort Wayne. Being raised in a military household, his father being a militia officer and veteran of the War of 1812 as well, 17-years-old John sought a military appointment; and, in time for the army expansion due to the Seminole conflicts and Indian removals, he was directly commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company I of the 1st U.S. Infantry Regiment on December 2, 1837. Promoted to 1st Lieutenant on March 2, 1839, he served in the Second Seminole War from 1839 to 1840. Taking part in the Mexican–American War he was promoted to Captain on October 31, 1846 and participated in the Siege of Vera Cruz in March 1847. Captain King continued to serve on frontier duty at various posts and gained the nickname "Iron Bull" together with a reputation as hard-working and competent officer.

In March 1861 he was stationed at San Antonio, Texas, and in defiance of the rising Texan rebels, he helped organizing Camp Green Lake and sailed with nine companies of Regulars safely to New York. He was promoted to Major and assigned to raise the new 15th U.S. Infantry Regiment on May 14, 1861. Ordered to set up headquarters at Wheeling, Virginia, he asked for permission to relocate to Ohio. Instead he was ordered to relocate to the Newport Barracks at Cincinnati, Kentucky. The regimental commander, Colonel Fitz-John Porter, held a double-commission as Brigadier General of Volunteers; and for most of the time Major King stayed in actual command of the regiment. In November King took the 1st Battalion of the 15th, for now being made up of 4 companies, and went to Camp Nevin. There the regular detachments were grouped as part of the brigade of Lovell Rousseau in Alexander McDowell McCook´s 2nd Division of the Army of the Ohio.

With additional reinforcements arriving Major King, as senior officer present, was assigned to command all regular forces in the brigade; in December already made up of 13 companies from the 15th, 16th and 19th regiments. By late February 1862 the detachment had been enlarged by another 6 companies as well as Battery H, 5th U.S. Artillery Regiment. Then King led the 844 infantrymen into the Battle of Shiloh, the battery being separated and fighting on another part of the battlefield. Shortly after the battle command of the, again enlarged, Regular Detachment developed on Lt. Col. Oliver L. Shepherd and King returned to his regiment. He led it in the Siege of Corinth and the Kentucky Campaign. When Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans took command of the new Army of the Cumberland, he took King and his battalion as his headquarters guard and personal escort; but returned them to the detachment when he formed the Regular Brigade in December.

Only days later the new brigade, part of Rouseau`s Division in the XIV Corps, would distinguish itself in the bloody Battle of Stones River, though suffering severe casualties. King was wounded while leading his regiment, being shot twice in the left arm and another time in the left hand; afterwards falling from his horse dislocating a shoulder.

While King slowly recovered, Gen. Rosecrans had nominated several officers for a brevet promotion for their services, among those the already nominated King. But instead of a brevet promotion he received a real promotion: on April 4, 1863 he was appointed Brigadier General of Volunteers, backdated to November 29. The new general returned to field duty in May 1863, taking command of the Regular Brigade from the just recently assigned Brig. Gen. Robert S. Granger.

While the Tullahoma Campaign unfolded King was unfit to command his men in the Battle of Hoover's Gap as his hand hadn´t fully healed yet. Meanwhile, he had also been made Lieutenant Colonel of the 14th U.S. Infantry Regiment though he didn´t serve in the capacity. However he returned to duty with the brigade shortly afterwards and in July briefly led the division. In September, now with Absalom Baird leading the division, King commanded his brigade in the Battle of Chickamauga; suffering the highest loss percentage of any Union brigade in those days with 56%. He would later be brevetted to Colonel for his role in that battle. He then led his men into the Chattanooga Campaign in which the brigade was augmented by the 11th Michigan Infantry, 19th Illinois Infantry and 69th Ohio Infantry regiments; where it participated in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, King missing the later due to sickness.

For the greater part of the Atlanta Campaign King would command the division due to Gen. Richard W. Johnson first being wounded and then being assigned to lead the corps. Afterwards the brigade, and King, stayed in the department in a relative quite assignment for the rest of the war; King frequently commanding a division. When the war ended King was breveted to Brigadier General in the regular army for the Battle of Ruff's Station and to Major General in both the regulars and volunteers for his war service.

King was made Colonel of the 9th U.S. Infantry Regiment in July 1865, and was sent to the Western Frontier. In 1877 he and his men briefly went to Chicago for keeping up public order during a railroad strike. He retired in 1882 and briefly settled in his home town before moving to Washington D.C. He died there of Pneumonia on April 7, 1888, and is interred on Arlington National Cemetery.

King was married to Matilda C. Davenport and had three children. Beside his widow he was only survived by a son, inventor Charles Brady King.
 

5fish

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John Haskell King (February 19, 1820 – April 7, 1888)
Find a grave... https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/5885454/john-haskell-king

Civil War Union Brigadier General. In 1837, he was appointed a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st US Infantry from Michigan and served on the frontier at Vera Cruz during Mexican War. At the start of the Civil War, he was placed in command of troops which participated at Shiloh, Corinth and at the Battle of Murfreesboro. In April, 1863, he was promoted Brigadier General and commanded a brigade in the XIV Corps at Chickamauga and during the Atlanta Campaign. From July 1864, until the end of the war he commanded a brigade of five battalions in the District of the Etowah. For distinguished service, he was brevetted Major General in the Regular Army on March 13, 1865. After the war, he remained in the Army and served at various stations on the western frontier until he was retired in 1882.
 

5fish

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His son has an amazing story... a man of many talents... https://www.revolvy.com/page/Charles-Brady-King

Charles Brady King (February 2, 1868 – June 22, 1957) was an American engineer and entrepreneur remembered as an automotive pioneer, artist, etcher, musician, poet, architect, mystic, industrialist and inventor.[2][3][4][5]

King was the first person in Detroit to design, build and drive a self-propelled automobile[5][6][7] – 3 months before Henry Ford built his automobile.[8] The Detroit Journal of March 7, 1896, reports that King drove his motor-powered vehicle down Woodward Avenue – being the first person in Detroit to build and drive such a vehicle.[9] The Journal also reports King made and sold the first complete automobile in Detroit.[9]

Early life
King was born February 2, 1868, at Camp Reynolds on Angel Island, California.[4][10] His father was a Civil War Union Army general, General John Haskell King.[2][5] His mother was Matilda C. Davenport, from the New England family line of Davenports that settled in Detroit.[4][5]

Career
King was first sent to Trinity College in Port Hope (Ontario) for two years, then went to Cascadilla School in Ithaca, New York, for preparation for entrance to Cornell University.[5] Then in 1887 he entered Cornell (engineering class of 1891), but was only there for two years.[4] He moved to Detroit around 1888 or 1889 at the age of 20, shortly after his father's death. His first full-time job was as a draftsman at Michigan Car Companyin Detroit.[4][5]

First car made by King
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Charles B. King 1893 first car design
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Gold Medal presented to Charles B. King, Umpire by H. Mueller Mfg. Co. Decatur, Ill.
King started designing and building his first car from the time of the Chicago World's Fair of 1893. He test drove his first car in Detroit in front of hundreds of spectators on March 6, 1896, at speeds up to seven miles per hour. It was powered by a Sintzengine. The time was just before 11 P.M. The route that King did started from a building on St. Antoine Street, going first south toward the Detroit River. When he arrived at Jefferson Avenue he turned right. After passing by several businesses he arrived at Woodward Avenue. He turned right again onto that street. He again passed by several businesses and then stopped for a short time at Cadillac Square at the Russell House hotel. Henry Ford was present when King demonstrated his horseless carriage, riding a bicycle behind![4][11][12][13]


King showed to the Detroit public his car, which probably was the first in Michigan, however not the first in the world nor even the first in the United States.[4] King served as a mentor to Henry Ford, Ransom E. Olds and others for their inspiration to develop a "horseless carriage". Their gasoline powered automobiles came out months later.[3][4]He did secret road tests in 1895, prior to this public display.[14]

The Detroit Journal interviewed King and there he said what the journal considers his most famous quote:

I am convinced they [horseless carriages] will in time supersede the horse.[15]

The Detroit Free Press newspaper wrote up an article the next morning saying:

The first horseless carriage seen in this city was out on the streets last night. It is the invention of Charles B. King, a Detroiter, and its progress up down Woodward Avenue about 11 o’clock caused a deal of comment, people crowding around it so that its progress was impeded. The apparatus seemed to work all right, and went at the rate of five or six miles an hour at an even rate of speed.[3]

King intended to run his motocycle in America's first automobile race on Thanksgiving Day in 1895. His car wasn't quite ready for the race, and like more than 70 other potential entrants to the event he was forced to drop out of the race.[16] Instead, King served as an umpire during the race on the car driven by Oscar Mueller. When Mueller collapsed from exposure near the end of the race, King took over as the driver. Other than the winning Duryea, this was the only other car to complete the entire course of the race.[4][17][18]

Other cars
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1915 King automobile advertisement
King joined the Olds Motor Works around 1900, but resigned after their plant burned down.[19] He then joined the Northern Manufacturing Company in 1902 and in 1903 became their chief engineer until 1908. One well known car he designed was the two-cylinder "Silent Northern" – the automobile with the first integrated motor and transmission assembly and the first side-step running boards. The 1907 Northern car model also had three-point engine suspension, air brakes, an air-controlled clutch and other innovations new to the auto industry of the time.[4]

King went to Europe for two years to study automotive design in 1908. When he came back in 1910 he started the King Motor Car Company with the knowledge he acquired. He was the first automaker to make cars with left-hand steering. He also was the first to successfully make a practical working V-8 engine. The King automobile called "the Eight" was advertised as "The Car of No Regrets." The King automobile was the only vehicle to feature left-hand steering at the 1912 New York Auto Show. He left the King Automobile company in 1912, however held full possession of his patents. The King name for the car company continued for many years thereafter and produced up to 1000 automobiles under this name. The company was ultimately absorbed by the Studebaker Car Company.[4][20]

King was a founding member of the Automobile Old Timers in 1939, the original name of what was to become the Automotive Hall of Fame.[4]

Other interests
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Pneumatic Hammer Patent 513941
King visited the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 to display two of his new inventions, a pneumatic hammer and a brake beam for railroad cars. By 1893 King worked for the Russel Wheel and Foundry Company and at the Exposition was put in charge of their exhibit in the Transportation Building, which he considered a great opportunity to learn about the latest engineering feats and exhibit his new inventions.[5] His pneumatic hammer invention (for riveting and caulking) was unique, being the only tool of its kind there, and earned him the Exposition highest award of a special diploma certificate and a bronze medal.[4][5][9]

King saw Gottlieb Daimler’s self-propelled carriage at the Exposition. He also learned about this same time that the Duryea Brothers had built and tested a self-propelled carriage. He then went about the quest of designing his own "horseless carriage".[3]

King provided parts, instructions and assistance to Henry Ford for his first horseless carriage.[3] He gave Ford two valves from one of his engines during retrofitting so that Ford could build his first car, the Quadricycle.[4][21]

King designed and assisted in building a 70-foot yacht called the Lady Frances that was sold to an Eastern buyer. It had many new innovations for gasoline motors, including a self-starting device. He formed with others the Michigan Yacht and Power Company.[22]

The American Motor League was organized by King[23] and he was issued the first membership number issued each year, No. 100.[24]
 
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