A reconstruction era sewing machine.

jgoodguy

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#1
Part of my fusion of sewing machines and the Civil War.
Dated to 1866(reconstruction era), but the seller swears that the Richmond Depot used them because he saw one in a Richmond museum. Could be. See Machine Sewing in RD Jackets. Be nice if someone knows what exhibit in what museum.

This model machine was being produced in the late 1850s-early 1860s. I found it in the cradle of the Confederacy, Montgomery, Alabama at an estate sale. Sewing machines produced the uniforms that clothed the Union Armies that aided Union victory. They were as much a part of Union victory as rifles were. It appears that they were part of the CSA logistics system.

Did I mention Mine all mine?
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jgoodguy

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#4
That is amazing! How cool is this find! Did the seller have any information on it? Is it in usable condition, do you plan to use it? I am looking forward to learning more on this post!!!!
The seller only knows his mother bought it 25 years ago at a Wetumpka Alabama antique shop. He saw one in a Richmond museum. Everything seems to be there and usable. Needs a lot of cleaning and servicing. I plan to use it in sewing machine living history technology exhibits that I give at Alabama State Parks.

This is the biggie
Wilson sewing machines

In 1851 Wilson patented his famous rotating hook, which performed the functions of a shuttle by seizing the upper thread and throwing its loop over a circular bobbin containing the under thread. 'This simplified the construction of the machine by getting rid of the reciprocation motion of the ordinary shuttle, and contributed to make a light tool silent running machine, eminently adapted to domestic use.[5]
It was far ahead of its times and it would be decades before most sewing machines had the circular bobbin which is by far the most common type of bobbin today.
 

jgoodguy

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#10
Man I’ve said this many many times before but I’ll say it again.... if this could only talk!
Some have stories to tell. A lady told me during one of my flea market trips about her parent's sewing machine which they bought during the great depression of the 1930s and the entire small town they were in came to use it to repair their clothing or make new when no one had any money.
 
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#11
I had a Franklin treddle I picked up a tag sale. kept it till little fingers were fascinated by the moving mechanism and it had to go! Found out there is still quite a desire for these old machines among certain Amish and other groups that forgo modern technology! Very interesting!
 

AshleyMel

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#12
:dance:
How wonderful Mr. jgoodguy!
I am setting up my sewing room in our new house and I am so jealous! I think I will have to attend more estate sales!
I am so happy for you! Thanks for sharing it with us!
 

jgoodguy

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Aug 17, 2011
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Birmingham, Alabama
#17
I had a Franklin treddle I picked up a tag sale. kept it till little fingers were fascinated by the moving mechanism and it had to go! Found out there is still quite a desire for these old machines among certain Amish and other groups that forgo modern technology! Very interesting!
Friend goes up into Amish country and makes me jealous with his sewing machine finds.
 



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