33rd Mississippi Infantry

lelliott19

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The companies of the 33rd Mississippi regiment were organized in March of 1862.

The Companies & the Captains
Company A "Cumberland Guards" (Neshoba County) - Capt. A. R. Booth
Company B "Amite Guards" (Amite County) - Capt. H. Morgan
Company C "Johnson Guards" (Lawrence County) - Capt. R. O. Byrne
Company D "Franklin Guards" (Franklin County) - Capt. R. R. Webb
Company E "Holmesville Guards" (Pike County) - Capt. J. T. Lamkin
Company F "Leake Rebels" (Leake County) - Capt. R. J. Hall
Company G "Davis Guards" (Choctaw County) - Capt. J. M. Tinnon
Company H "Rebel Avengers" (Coahoma County) - Capt. W. S. Warren
Company I "Mississippi Defenders" (Panola County) Capt. W. B. Johnson
Company K "Amite Defenders" (Amite County) - First Lieut. Moses Jackson commanding

Initially, the officers of the regiment included:
Colonel - David W. Hurst
Lieut Colonel - William B. Johnson
Major - Jabez L. Drake

The regimental organization and election of officers was completed on 17 April 1862 at Grenada MS. The regiment did not participate in the Battle of Shiloh but was assigned to Brig Gen. Sterling A. M. (SAM) Wood's brigade which included the 16th Alabama, 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and the 32nd Mississippi. By June 12,1862,the regiment reported 669 men present; 310 men absent;no arms except 379 condemned muskets. By then, Corinth had been evacuated and the Confederate army had fallen back to Tupelo. At Corinth Oct 305, 1862, the 33rd MS was part of the brigade of General Villepigue. The 33rd MS is mentioned by Maj. Gen. Mansfield Lovell, Division Commander, as one of the regiments particularly distinguished in carrying,"with empty guns", the outer line of rifle pits and the hill of a Federal battery. In January 1863 the regiment was assigned to Featherston's Brigade, Loring's Division and in 1865, was consolidated into the 22nd Mississippi Infantry Regiment. (A more complete regimental history is posted below in comments.)

History of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry
by Dr. Sidney W. Bondurant
Mississippi Civil War Battlefield Commission; Department of Archives & History

The entire 8 chapter volume is available free of charge through the generosity of the author and is located here http://www.angelfire.com/ms2/33Miss/
 
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lelliott19

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Letter of Condolence
To the widow of Matthew A. Dunn

John C. Wilkinson, 33rd Miss, Company K, Amite Defenders
From: https://ehistory.osu.edu/exhibitions/Regimental/mississippi/confederate/33rdMississippi/wilkinson

Hamburg, Edgefield District, S.C.
February 15, 1865

Mrs. M.A. Dunn,

My Dear Friend, I seat myself with a heart filed with sorrow to pen you a few lines to let you know that I do truly mourn and sympathize with you on account of you great irreparable loss.

On the 22nd____, I received the sad and heartrending intelligence that Mr. M. A. Dunn and L.L. Anderson of my mess and seven others of our Co. were killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee on the 30th of November 1864.

Mr. Dunn and I were only slightly aquainted when our Co. organized, but before leaving our beloved homes, we agreed to be members of the same family in Camp and drew our first rations together and continued so until I was wounded in May last.

And to me, he proved to be a true friend under all circumstances, in sickness, in health, in trials, and under all the hardships we had to undergo, he was always a patient and cheerful friend.

I am incompetent to write a eulogy upon such a character, and will only say to you that M. A. Dunn was free from the influence of the many vices and evils so common in Camp which entice so many from the path of rectitude.

But did by a well ordered walk and godly conversation make manifest to his comrades that he was a devoted Christian, true gentleman and patriotic soldier.

Being kind and obliging, he enjoyed the good will and confidence of all who had the pleasure of being acquainted with him.

By this sad bereavement of Co. lost one of its first members, Amite County a good citizen, Ebenezar a worthy member, and you and your dear little ones, a kind and dearly beloved husband and father.

Dear Friend, though I join you in shedding a tear of grief, let us not mourn as those who are without hope, for we feel assured that our loss is his Eternal gain, that his freed spirit is now singing praises to our Blessed Savior in the Paradis above where all is joy and peace.

Oh, that we could truly adopt the language of Paul under this heavy affliction - "And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose." Then, how consoling would be the language of our Saviour, "Let not your heart be troubled. Ye believe in God believe also in me. In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go to prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you unto myself, that where I am there you may be also. Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you, not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid. For because I live, ye shall live also." Then, my afflicted Sister, be admonished by the poorest of the poor to look to the fountain whence cometh all our help and strength; Jesus alone can comfort you in all your trails.

"For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, his ears are open unto their prayers." We have the promise of the comforter, and Paul says, "Likewise, the spirit also helpeth our infirmities for we know not what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groaning which cannot be uttered."

And to give us full assurance, our Blessed savior informs us that He maketh intercession for the Saints, that according to the will of God.

And so, there remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God, and we have so many sweet and precious promises. Let us therefore come boldly into the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in each time of need.

I know that the ties of nature are such that you cannot refrain from weeping and though your dear husband cannot return to you, yet you have hope that you may go where he is, and join him in singing a song of deliverance.

And may God on tender mercy remember you and your dear Little Ones. May He lead, rule, guide, and direct you safely through this life, giving you that sweet consolation which He alone can give. And finally, through the merits of his dear Son, crown you His (with your dear husband) in his kingdom above where "God will wipe away all tears from your eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither shall there be any more pain, but where all is Joy and Peace is the desire of one who wished you well.

You have no doubt seen a list of the killed, wounded and missing at the Battle of Franklin, Tenn. on the 30th November 1864. And many more must have fallen at the Battle of Nashville on the 15th of December from which I have no news from my company.

When I left Camp I left six messmates whom I loved, four of them, J.P. and C.C. Lea, L.L Anderson, and M. A. Dunn have poured out their life's blood in defense of their country. R.S. Capell is severely wounded and my dear son, W.H.W. reported captured. Truly, we have cause to mourn but I desire not to mourner.

Not wishing to weary you with my imperfection, I close; when at the throne of grace, remember me and mine and believe me to be your friend in deep affliction.

John C. Wilkinson

Letter provided by Michael N. Pittman MD, descendant of John Cain Wilkinson, and posted here https://ehistory.osu.edu/exhibitions/Regimental/mississippi/confederate/33rdMississippi/wilkinson
 

Legion Para

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This website contains a wealth of information on the 33rd Mississippi.

http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/davidg33/


Including the Rosters.

http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/davidg33/rosters.htm

masthead.jpg
 
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Legion Para

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https://mississippiconfederates.wor...-mississippis-battleflags-exhibit-in-jackson/


frederick-c-winkler.jpg

Postwar picture of Frederick C. Winkler, who commanded the 26th Wisconsin Infantry at the Battle of Peach Tree Creek – Wisconsin Historical Society

Lieutenant Colonel Frederick C. Winkler of the 26th Wisconsin Infantry, wrote this account
of how his regiment captured the 33rd Mississippi’s flag: “The order came, and we moved forward simultaneously with the brigade on our right. We gained the first hill just as our skirmishers were falling back from the second. We moved forward still, and had just gained a shallow ravine covered with bushes between the two hills when the enemy appeared in strong line of battle at a fence running along the brow of the hill in our front. As the two lines were within easy musket-range of each other, the battle commenced at once with great fierceness…In our front the field was open, but some sixty yards from our left there was a dense forest. Of this the enemy availed themselves, and came upon our flank in strong force, opening an enfilading fire upon us, while at the same time the line in front came nearer and nearer, until the two lines were in many places less than a rod apart. For a time the conflict was desperate. I took every man who could be spared on the right to re-enforce the left. At last the enemy broke and fled. We pursued him on his very heels to the top of the hill, captured the regimental flag of the Thirty-third Mississippi, and leaving Colonel Drake, of that regiment, and 34 others dead, and at least double that number severely wounded…” (Official Records, Series 1, Volume XXXVIII, Part 2, pages 466-467).


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Flag33Miss.jpg
 

lelliott19

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This history comes from Dunbar Rowland’s “Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898” and was submitted by C. J. Johnson. About the 33rd Mississippi, Rowland wrote:

“This regiment was organized at Grenada, and field officers elected April 17, 1862. The companies were enlisted for the war. It was reported as assigned to the brigade of Gen. S. A. M. Wood, in the army at Corinth, with an effective total, April 26, 1862 of 378. June 12 the regiment was at Grenada; present, 669, absent, 310; no arms but 379 condemned muskets. Corinth had then been evacuated, and the army had fallen back to Tupelo.

Brig.-Gen. John B. Villepigue’s command at Abbeville and Grenada, in June, 1862, included the Thirty-third…The brigade of General Villepigue [was] in the attack upon Rosecrans at Corinth, October 3-5, 1862. The Thirty-third is mentioned by Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell, Division Commander, as one of the regiments particularly distinguished in carrying the outer line of rifle pits and the hill on which was posted a Federal battery, capturing a Parrot gun, the Lady Richardson. In his report Villepigue said: I wish to mention for conspicuous gallantry Col. D. W. Hurst, Thirty-third Mississippi Regiment, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns. … The casualties of the brigade were 21 killed, 76 wounded, 71 missing.

Villepigue’s Brigade was ordered to Louisiana, where Villepigue died on the march to Port Hudson, November 9, 1862. Later in November and December Grant advanced from Memphis, on the Central Railroad; a campaign marked by the battle of Coffeeville, December 5, 1862 and Van Dorn’s raid to Holly Springs. In January, 1863, the brigade, including the Thirty-third, was under the command of General Rust, of Arkansas.

Later the regiment was part of Featherston’s Brigade. Featherston was ordered to Snyder’s Bluff, March 19, 1863 on account of the reconnaissance by Sherman’s troops and Porter’s gunboats from Steele’s Bayou to Rolling Fork and Deer Creek. He took the Twenty-second and Thirty-third Regiments and a battery, under command of Colonel Hurst, up to the junction of Rolling Fork and Deer Creek, skirmished there April 20, 1863 and followed the boats as they slowly pushed through the willow-lined bayous.

April 25, 1863 the two Mississippi Regiments (22nd and 33rd) were in a skirmish with Sherman’s troops and troops were landed from the boats to cut them off, but they retired without loss. Being transferred by steamer to Fort Pemberton, they were ordered back to Edwards May 2, 1863 to meet Grant’s movement south of Vicksburg…

The regiment participated in General Johnston’s movement to the Big Black River for the relief of Vicksburg, retreating to Jackson when Vicksburg was surrendered, and was on duty with Featherston’s Brigade around Jackson, confronted by Sherman’s troops, July 9-16, 1863. Later in the year Loring’s Division had headquarters at Canton.

Colonel Hurst was reported in command of the regiment in January, 1964; Lieut.-Col. Drake in February, 1864. General Sherman advanced from Vicksburg to Meridian in February, and Loring’s and French’s Divisions, under General Polk, retreated to Demopolis, Ala. In the spring of 1864 they moved to Montevallo, Ala., and thence to Rome, Ga., to join General Johnston in resisting the advance of Sherman from Chattanooga…

The regiment, with Featherston’s Brigade, arrived at Resaca May 12, 1864 and went into battle at once, aiding in holding McPherson at bay until reinforcements could arrive. This battle continued until the 16th, when the army crossed the river.

Near New Hope Church, May 31, the skirmishers of the brigade were reinforced to about 400 men, under Lieut.-Col. Harrod, and ordered to drive in the Federal skirmishers, which was gallantly done, after which the men pushed on against the Federal main line, intrenched, where they suffered heavy loss, about one-fourth of the number engaged. Harrod was wounded, and Capt. J. C. Sharp… was killed within ten paces of the works, his last word being ‘Forward.’

The flank movements carried the battle line to Kenesaw Mountain, where the Thirty-third took part in the famous repulse of Sherman’s assault, June 27, 1864. Early in July Johnston… was relieved by General Hood, who began a series of assaults upon Sherman’s army.

At Peachtree Creek, July 20, where the brigade charged through a difficult field, attempting to break the Federal line which was protected with rail works thrown up as the fight began, the losses of the regiment were severe. General Featherston wrote: ‘Col. J. L. Drake, the only field officer with the Thirty-third Regiment, a gallant and excellent officer, fell beyond the enemy’s first line of works, leading his regiment in the charge and displaying the highest qualities of the true soldier…’ Capt. Moses Jackson, left in command, reported that the regiment carried the temporary rail works and advanced into a ravine 100 yards beyond, where the fighting was very stubborn. They were on the extreme right of the brigade, and without support on that flank… and were forced to retreat with the brigade. Casualties…15 officers, 144 men.

Colonel Wood, commanding the Union brigade attacked, reported: The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin captured a stand of colors, and the skirmishers of the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth New York, a battle-flag. This brigade buried the bodies of thirty-eight dead found behind and near our advanced line of battle, among whom was Colonel Drake, Thirty-third Mississippi.

The Colonel of the Twentieth Connecticut wrote that wounded officers belonging to the Third, Thirty-third… [and] Forty-fourth Mississippi Regiments, left on the field in front of the Twentieth, remarked that they lost more men during this engagement in killed and wounded than they had before during the war. Colonel Buckingham, of the Twentieth Connecticut, wrote that during our advance a rebel color bearer in front of the right of my regiment was killed, and a rebel officer, who sprang forward and seized the colors to bear them off was also shot dead

The regiment was on duty in the trenches around Atlanta until the evacuation at the close of August. In the October, 1864, campaign on the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, Featherston’s Brigade captured the Federal post at Big Shanty, was with Loring’s Division in the capture of Acworth, and with Stewart’s Corps in the destruction of the railroad between Dalton and Resaca, after which they moved through the mountains to Gadsden, Ala., and skirmished at Decatur, October 26-29, and moved to Tuscumbia.

Stewart’s Corps marched against Schofield at Columbia, and while Lee’s Corps attacked across the river, Stewart’s Corps joined in the movement to Spring Hill to cut off the retreat. Schofield retreated to the intrenchments at Franklin, where General Hood attacked November 30, 1864 carrying the outer line but failing to win the second in a battle of great slaughter…Featherston’s Brigade in this assault had 76 killed, 200 wounded, 76 missing. ‘The color bearer of the Thirty-third was killed some fifteen paces from the works, when Lieut. H. C. Shaw, of Company K, carried them forward, and when in the act of planting them on the works was killed, his body failing in the trench, the colors falling in the works.’

On the line in front of Nashville Featherston’s Brigade had an effective strength of 781… Capt. T. L. Cooper was in command of the regiment December 10. Loring’s Division was on the front line of Stewart’s Corps…General Thomas attacked and broke the line, carrying two redoubts and taking many prisoners, December 15, 1864 but Loring’s Division gallantly formed a new line and checked the progress of the defeat that day. Next day, however, though they repulsed every attack, they were involved in the general disaster.

At Columbia, December 20, 1864 Featherston’s Brigade was selected as one of seven for the rear guard commanded by Walthall and they held Columbia two days with the army on the march. The Thirty-third had an aggregate present of 91.
On the retreat to the Tennessee River they defeated their pursuers at Anthony’s Hill and Sugar Creek, December 25-26, 1864. On the 28th they recrossed the Tennessee River, and thence marched to Tupelo.

About the 1st of February, 1865, the remnant of Loring’s Division began the movement to reinforce General Johnston in the Carolinas. They were ordered forward from Augusta, Ga., to Newberry, S. C., February 25, 1865. In the Carolinas campaign against Sherman they participated in the battle of Kinston, March 10, 1985 and Bentonville, March 19-21, 1865 on the 19th making a gallant and successful charge, with heavy loss. Organization of army under Gen. J. E. Johnston, near Smithfield, N. C., March 31, 1865, shows Major-General Walthall in command of Stewart’s Corps; Featherston’s Brigade commanded by Maj. Martin A. Oatis, the Thirty-third Regiment by Lieut. George B. Lenoir. April 9, 1865 the First, Twenty-second and Thirty-third Regiments and First Battalion were consolidated as the Twenty-second Regiment, Col. Martin A. Oatis commanding…Hostilities were suspended April 18, the army was surrendered April 26, 1865 near Durham Station; paroled at Greensboro.”
http://choctawplaindealer.com/2015/07/29/the-civil-war-history-of-33rd-mississippi-infantry/
http://choctawplaindealer.com/2015/08/05/the-civil-war-history-of-33rd-mississippi-infantry-part-2/
http://choctawplaindealer.com/2015/08/12/the-civil-war-history-of-33rd-mississippi-infantry-part-3/
 

AUG

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Previous thread on the capture of the 33rd Mississippi's colors at Peachtree Creek:
http://civilwartalk.com/threads/the-capture-of-the-33rd-mississippi-infantrys-colors.90857/

W. H. Conner, who served in the 33rd Indiana Infantry, later claimed that he actually captured the colors of the 33rd Mississippi.

After the 33rd Mississippi's flag was returned to its home state, Conner wrote the following letter to Dunbar Rowland, the Mississippi State Historian:

Mr. Dunbar Rowland LL D., State Historian, Jackson, Miss.

Dear Sir, I am in receipt of your letter of the 17th with reference to the battle flag of the 33rd Miss. CSA. I thank you very much for the information it contains. I am at a loss to know why the 26th Wis claimed the capture of the flag of the 33rd Miss. The 26th Wis belonged to Col. Wood's Brigade, 3rd Div 20th Corps and was not near the 33rd Miss. The 33rd Miss was in the front line of battle and in the immediate front of the 33rd Ind. At one time during the battle the guns of the 33rd Miss and the guns of the 33rd Ind. almost touched. It was at this time that the Colonel of the 33rd Miss was killed only a few paces in front of Co. K of the 33rd Ind. He was almost in front of his men when killed. I can see him yet as he waved his sword cheering his gallant men on in the fighting.

At this time it was most desperate, almost hand to hand. It was only a question of time as to which sided would gain the day. At this juncture of the fighting the Color Bearer of the 33rd Miss waved his flag back and forth in front of Co . K 33rd Ind. Which was a wonderful daring act. The 33rd Ind. dashed forward as the Confederates were thrown in confusion. I made a dash for the colors of the 33rd Miss and caught the flag just as the brave Color Bearer was killed. I did not kill him for which I am very thankful.

From the large numbers of the dead and wounded I believe that every one of the Color Bearers were killed. After the confederates had retreated from the hill and were fighting as they retreated, Capt. Beecher of Gen Ward's staff rode up to me and said, "Soldier let me take the flag and I will take care of it for you." I gave him the flag which was a foolish thing for me to do. At the time I did not care anything about the flag. Since the World's War I have regretted very much that I allowed this officer to take the flag. I never could learn what he did with it and cannot understand how it came in possession of the 26th Wis. unless it was that Capt. Beecher was a member of that regiment. If necessary I can make affidavit to this statement. There are none of my company living who witnessed the capture of the flag by me. Only four of us living who were mustered in Sept. 12, 1861, and I am one of the four and the youngest, of the four, 84 years old. The next day after the battle we buried the Confederate dead. We dug a circular grave and laid 45 of Col. Drake's men side by side with their feet towards the center and buried Col. Drake in the center. We placed a marker with the following inscription "Colonel Drake and 45 of his men." Comrade Hall of my company cut the inscription on a board. These brave men were buried the same as our men in the best possible manner under the circumstances.

I will also state that when the Confederates advanced to the attack, the 3rd Div of the 20th Corps had just crossed Peach Tree Creek and had stacked their guns and were engaged in making our coffee. Col. Harrison, (afterwards President) was in command of the First Brigade 3rd Div 20th Corps. Col. Coburn was in command of the 2nd Brigade and Col. Wood of the 3rd Brigade. Col. Coburn was first to discover the advance of the Confederates and requested Harrison to advance their lines to a ridge in our front along with his advance. Col. Harrison did so but Col. Wood refused to do so claiming that his orders from Gen. Ward was to remain where he was. Finally during the heaviest of the fighting Col. Coburn of the 2nd Brigade requested Col. Winkler to the 26th Wis to advance his regiment as the Confederates were flanking the 33rd Ind. Col. Winkler did so. My regiment the 33rd Ind. went into the fight with 382 men. The regiment lost 117 killed and wounded, other regiments of the division about the same number. For some time after the fighting was over I carried water to the wounded Confederates soldiers.

The loss on both sides was very great. I was in many fights but never saw more dead and wounded than I saw at Peach Tree Creek. Featherston s Brigade were wonderful fighters. I do not think there is a man living who took part in the battle of Peach Tree Creek who has a better recollection of that battle than I have and I feel that it was a great Honor to be the captor of the flag of the gallant 33rd Mississippi and I claim that honor in spite of any claim that the 26th Wis can make. If the men of my company were living they would co-oberate me in my statement or claim. If any of Gen Featherstone's men are living I would be pleased to hear if this statement is satisfactory to you and would be pleased to hear from you.

Sincerely and cordially, W.H. Conner.
 

AUG

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Here's a short account of the battle of Franklin from a veteran of Co. A, 33rd Mississippi. From Confederate Veteran Vol. 2, p. 186.

D. J. Wilson, Franklin.jpg


I think its interesting he mentions overrunning Wagner's advanced line, since the general idea is that Loring's Division (containing Featherston's Brigade) didn't touch Wagner's line since they were on the far Confederate right flank. I think its possible that the Confederate brigades at Franklin covered a much wider space than is generally thought.
 

DixieRifles

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Later the regiment was part of Featherston’s Brigade. Featherston was ordered to Snyder’s Bluff, March 19, 1863 on account of the reconnaissance by Sherman’s troops and Porter’s gunboats from Steele’s Bayou to Rolling Fork and Deer Creek. He took the Twenty-second and Thirty-third Regiments and a battery, under command of Colonel Hurst, up to the junction of Rolling Fork and Deer Creek, skirmished there April 20, 1863 and followed the boats as they slowly pushed through the willow-lined bayous.

April 25, 1863 the two Mississippi Regiments (22nd and 33rd) were in a skirmish with Sherman’s troops and troops were landed from the boats to cut them off, but they retired without loss. Being transferred by steamer to Fort Pemberton, they were ordered back to Edwards May 2, 1863 to meet Grant’s movement south of Vicksburg…

I'm preparing a presentation on the 22nd Mississippi Regiment, which was brigaded with the 33 Mississippi Regiment for most of the War. I had found/or/compiled a list of regiments that were under General Loring at Fort Pemberton in March 1863, BUT I began to question this after reading Rowland's unit history in detail and reading the OR's, etc. I'm sure that most of the regiments in my list was involved in the defenses in the Mississippi Delta but I wanted to find out which ones repelled the Union forces coming down the Tallahatchie River.

Here is a bit of detail about the participation of the 33rd Mississippi Regiment in the Yazoo Pass Expedition and the Steele Bayou Expedition.

As noted by Rowland, the 22nd & 33rd Mississippi Regiment and one section of artillery under Col. Hurst was sent up to Rolling Fork (river) to stop the Union advance of Sherman's troops. This was known as the Steele Bayou Expedition or also the Rolling Fork Expedition, as that describes the movement of the Confederate forces. The Confederate infantry engaged the 5 gunboats on Apil 20 and 25th.
Before this expedition, General Leonard Ross (later replaced by Quinby) launched an expedition down the Tallahatchie by blowing a channel through Moon Lake and Yazoo Pass. The Yazoo Pass Expedition traveled down the flooded Tallahatchie River to confront the Confederates at Fort Pemberton. The Union attempted the first attack on Fort Pemberton on March 21 thru 23rd. The order was given to retreat back to the Mississippi River but the commander was replaced and the expedition returned for one more attempt at Fort Pemberton on April 4.

The 33rd Mississippi Regiment was at Snyder's Bluff under the command of General Featherston. They were ordered on the 19 March to depart for Rolling Fork. The two regiments traveled by steamer up the Yzaoo and then up the Sunflower River (aka Big Sunflower River) to the Rolling Fork river that cuts over to Steele Bayou. (see my Map)
The Union fleet attempted to travel up Steele Bayou and switch over to continue North on Deer Creek then to Rolling Fork. Their plan was to return to the Yazoo River by the Sunflower River in order to flank the Confederate forces at Haynes' Bluff.
After their engagement, they continued on to Fort Pemberton again by steamer. (Shown in RED in map)
So if I have all my dates correct, the 33rd Mississippi did not arrive at Fort Pemberton in time for either the first attacks on March 21 nor the second attacks on April 4. I say this because I thought I found a source that said the 22nd Mississippi arrived at Fort Pemberton the last week of March. However, I have read Rowland's histories of so many regiments that that date may be associated with another regiment.


MAP_SteelBayou Expd-xxx.JPG


Info on other Mississippi Regiments:

31 Mississippi [Featherston's Bgde]- Ordered to Rolling Fork and arrived 10 days after the 22 & 33 Miss had arrived. Also took steamer to Ft Pemberton.

3 Mississippi [Featherston's Bgde] - Operation at Rolling Fork. On 28 March was sent to Ft Pemberton(which means it may have been present at the Union's second attack.)

1st Battalion Sharpshooters [Featherston's Bgde earlier in war and in May 30] - On 24 March, 1st Btn was 6 miles from mouth of Deer Creek cutting trees to obstruct the Union gunboats. April 4, made reconnaissance on Tallahatchie River near Fort Pemberton with the 37 Mississippi Regiment.

40 Mississippi [Featherston's Bgde]- Forney's Division at Snyder's Bluff on the Yazoo River. On March 12, ordered to Yazoo City. Duty at Fort Pemberton until April 4.

35 Mississippi - same details at the 40 Mississippi.

If anyone has any more details about the time frame of when the 33rd Mississippi, or the 22nd Mississippi, arrived at Fort Pemberton, please post a remark.
I did refer to a few resources including the booklet "The Yazoo Pass Expedition" by Larry McCluney, Jr. His book mentions both expeditions but does not detail the individual regiments nor mentions the role of General Featherston. I believe one resource states the General Featherson did accompany the 22nd and 33rd Mississippi in their importation mission to stop General Sherman on the Steel Bayou.


BTW, I used a source that listed all the movements of the 22nd Mississippi during the entire war. Summing up the distances, while excluding the minor marches & counter-marches, their total travel by foot, rail and boat totaled 5,000 miles. Realize they traveled twice into Kentucky. I suspect the 33rd Mississippi traveled very close to the same amount.
 

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