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Zouave Pipes...

Discussion in 'Civil War Uniforms & Relics' started by Private Watkins, Jun 27, 2015.

  1. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    Saw this listed in an auction recently... hand carved Zouave pipe, the craftsmanship is really amazing! Does anyone out there collect Civil War pipes...?
    th%5B1%2F2%2F6%2F2%2F9%2F12629146%5D%2Csizedata%5B840x2000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D.jpg
    th%5B1%2F2%2F6%2F2%2F2%2F12622121%5D%2Csizedata%5B840x2000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D.jpg
     
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  3. MRB1863

    MRB1863 Captain Forum Host

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    You are correct!!! That is amazing craftsmanship! Have to wonder, is the figure a portrait of the carver???
     
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  4. Pvt.Shattuck

    Pvt.Shattuck Sergeant Major

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    Whoever made that pipe was a highly skilled artist. I don't think it is a piece of folk art carved by a soldier in camp.
     
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  5. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Gorgeous.
     
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  6. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    Another beautiful carved Zouave pipe... this one perhaps not quite as exquisite as the first one above, but still a very nice piece of work...

    upload_2015-12-23_17-16-25.png upload_2015-12-23_17-17-1.png upload_2015-12-23_17-18-7.png

    Admiring these beauties is almost enough to make me want to pick up a pipe and send out a few smoke signals... :wink:

    Any other examples of Zouave or other hand carved ACW related pipes out there that anyone would like to share...?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2015
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  7. 7thWisconsin

    7thWisconsin Sergeant

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    Is that second pipe post war? Zouaves were still a picturesque part of the French army until the Great War. I wouldn't mind finding a pipe like that in my stocking...
     
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  8. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    It certainly could be post-war... I have a mental image of an old Zouave veteran puffing away on something like that while marching in his town's Veteran's Day parade...
    [​IMG]


    It doesn't strike me as European... don't know that I have a lot hard facts to go on for that statement, but it just seems to me that when I've seen European zouave pipes they are a bit more ornate and have a different look than an ACW zouave... but I could be wrong, certainly not an expert...
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Patrick H

    Patrick H Major

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    The first pipe, in particular, is a remarkable carving. I can see from details in the face and beard that it was carved with specialized gouges and veining tools ("v" gouges). Beautiful work and, yes, it is of portrait quality. The bowl looks like it might be lined with something--perhaps clay or meerschaum. Is that correct?
     
  10. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    You mean Billy Yank didn't just carve that with his pocket knife...? :wink: I don't have an appreciation for the different types of tools a master craftsman would use, but I agree with you completely that specialized instruments would have to have been used by someone with a high degree of skill...

    And good eye Patrick... yes it does look like there's some kind of liner in the bowl...
     
  11. Patrick H

    Patrick H Major

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    Actually, the pipe might have been roughed out to basic shape with a knife--or it might have been done with an automated machine of some sort. Visualize a pattern router driven by a leather drive belt and overhead pulley and shaft system in a 19th century factory.

    If you're curious about the tools, this video will show representative types being used. Note that most of Mary's tools are larger, because she's carving a furniture leg, but the principles still apply. Note, too, that Mary's chair leg has been roughed out by machine but is being finished by hand. (By the way, I've never met Mary, but her mother lives in my town and is an acquaintance).

     
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  12. 7thWisconsin

    7thWisconsin Sergeant

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    I have a meershaum, and it's one of my favorite pipes. I used to have one carved into a buffalo head. Suffice to say, I learned how fragile they are with that pipe. Never saw another. <sigh>
    I love those pictures of the vets; they look so much like reenactors!
     
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  13. Mike Serpa

    Mike Serpa Captain

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    Meerschaum Pipe Given to Colonel Clark Lagow by U.S. Grant. Meerschaum pipe (technically a cigar-holder or cigar-pipe) measuring 3 1/4" long featuring a well executed spread wing eagle clutching a rabbit. Excellent condition with toning to the bowl. Accompanying the pipe is a letter dated Jan. 29, 1916 stating that "This pipe was given by Gen U.S. Grant to Clark B. Lagow while he was aide on Gen'l Grants staff during the War of the Rebellion", continuing on to outline the family history of ownership until 1916. Lagow and Grant were from the same area and enlisted together on the same day in 1861, becoming life-long friends. During the siege of Vicksburg, Grant commented that he expected to dine in Vicksburg soon. The comment was leaked to the Vicksburg press which responded that if Grant was to dine in Vicksburg, he must first "catch the rabbit". Eventually, Vicksburg fell and Grant had his rabbit. After the city was captured, the Yankees published the famous "wallpaper newspaper" and the soldiers added "Grant has caught the rabbit." Lagow was aide-de-camp to Grant during the Siege of Vicksburg.
    lf-2.jpg
    lf.jpg
    http://historical.ha.com/itm/milita...olonel-clark-lagow-by-us-grant/a/6118-49581.s
     
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  14. Mike Serpa

    Mike Serpa Captain

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    One of the Most Magnificent Carved Civil War Pipes We've Ever Seen. Really an important piece of American folk art in addition to its importance as a Civil War artifact. Massive size and weight carved entirely by hand of burl wood. The front of the pipe is deeply relief carved with a full spread wing eagle with shield, holding a riband in its beak, "The Union Now And Forever", really exceptional work. The one side of the pipe is relief carved with an artillery piece with "64" on the barrel, doubtless referring to the date the pipe was made. The other side of the pipe depicts a mounted soldier, again beautifully executed. The back of the pipe is relief carved with the full nude figure of a woman holding a riband inscribed "Liberty", the whole surrounded by a laurel wreath. The flat bottom of the pipe bears the neatly incised carved legend, "Made In Camp Near Falmouth, Va. By Benj. G. Chapman 146 NYSV". The pipe is in perfect untouched condition, with no indication of having been smoked and nice rich patina. Chapman enlisted in the 146th on October 10, 1862 and served with the regiment until May 3, 1863 when he transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps. The 146th, known as Garrard's Tigers, were, for a period uniformed as Zouaves. The regiment was heavily engaged at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg during Chapman's term of service. The regiment lost a total of 133 men killed and mortally wounded. Accompanied by a complete set of records. Sold for $5,377.50

    lf.jpeg lf-2.jpeg
    http://historical.ha.com/itm/milita...6015-57948.s?ic4=GalleryView-Thumbnail-071515
     
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  15. Patrick H

    Patrick H Major

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    Those are beauties, Mike!
     
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  16. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    Fantastic... both pipes!!
     
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  17. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    I'm curious what any of you might make of this never smoked pipe bowl...? Could the Heart & Star represent the 24th & 12th Corps? The "Va" would certainly seem to represent Virginia, perhaps where this was carved, and the initials might represent the recipient and maker/presenter of the pipe...? This is reported to be a Civil War relic, but don't know that it can be verified... what do you all think...?
    s-l1600 (7).jpg s-l1600 (3).jpg s-l1600 (5).jpg s-l1600 (4).jpg s-l1600 (6).jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
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  18. Patrick H

    Patrick H Major

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    Your speculation about the various designs seems logical to me and as good an explanation as any. I would not have understood the heart and star symbolism. However, those are common design elements in all kinds of folk art. They show up frequently. The presence of "Va" is pretty intriguing. I think it's definitely commemorative of some event or a tribute to the recipient. I think this pipe is much more "folk artsy" than the first zouave carving, and might actually have been done with a knife, rather than specialized carving tools. Regardless of that, it was very skillfully carved. I like it a lot.
     
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  19. SquirrelHudson

    SquirrelHudson Corporal

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    These pipes are remarkable.
     
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  20. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    Thanks, and I agree this one has more of the "carved in the field" look than the first two...
     
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  21. Private Watkins

    Private Watkins 2nd Lieutenant

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    This one is quite nice with its hinged kepi lid... although it has some damage on the right side...
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]



    I might be mistaken, but thought I read somewhere that the hinged lid was intended to be closed while smoking, with air coming in through vents in the nose... but not sure about that. Does anyone know if that was the case or not?
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
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