Discussion Who Grew the Confederacy's Wheat?

Joined
Jul 2, 2017
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598
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Georgia
#1
The Shenandoah Valley was of crucial importance to the Confederacy: it served as a highway for Confederate troops in their forays north, and as the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy," where a great deal of the South's wheat was grown. I'm curious to know just who the farmers in the Shenandoah Valley were. Did they mostly consist of smallholders, or did some of them manage to prosper? How many owned slaves, and how supportive were they of the institution and secession?
 

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Dec 16, 2011
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Saint Joseph
#4
The Shenandoah Valley was of crucial importance to the Confederacy: it served as a highway for Confederate troops in their forays north, and as the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy," where a great deal of the South's wheat was grown. I'm curious to know just who the farmers in the Shenandoah Valley were. Did they mostly consist of smallholders, or did some of them manage to prosper? How many owned slaves, and how supportive were they of the institution and secession?
Very interesting question, I will be interested in the answer.
 
Joined
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#5
Wheat?

"Indian corn" or maize (Zea mays) appeared to be a real staple in the Southern diet... To the degree that vitamin deficiency/ malnourishment diseases like pellagra were not that uncommon.

Hominy, corn meal, corn pone, corn bread, corn "johnny cakes," or "hoe cakes" or grits or mush. Or "parched." Or on the cob.
Sorry for the imprecise language on my part, many more crops were grown in the Shenandoah besides wheat, including corn.
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
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San Antonio, Texas
#6
Naw, that's OK. Not imprecise at all! The "imprecise term" as I'm sure you know, is that British English pretty much uses "corn" as a catch-all for any and all grain crop! This confuses we North Americans who think "corn='on the cob'" or "Indian corn."

I hope I did not derail your discussion thread about the Shenandoah Valley and its importance. Certainly, the place was first to suffer from "hard war" by W.T. Sherman, which may well support your thesis about it being something of a "bread basket." As you know, several stinging Federal defeats emerged from the Shenandoah, and so apparently that is why it was selected as a "laboratory" of sorts for the application of hard war versus the destruction of armies strategy for ending the rebellion...
 
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
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San Antonio, Texas
#7
Did the Shenandoah have much of a unionist contingent to speak of?
Certainly the Appalachian areas of West Virginia, Eastern Tennessee, Western North Carolina, and even Northern Alabama did... Of course much of this was resistance to any state, be it the Federal Gov't. or the Secessionist rebel Gov't. making demands on resources, labor, food, etc. Resistance to conscription, forming "lay out" bands, etc. Of course there were also actual so-called "Tory" bands who sided with the Union over the CSA too.

Those hardscrabble poor white South'rons made some tough infantry, this is certain! Just look at the prodigious forced marches carried out by Secessionist rebel troops from that area, no?
 



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