Whipple hat/havelocks

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
d-c-yakey-and-whipple-s-patent-cap-001-jpg.jpg


I guess I should also re-post this tintype from my collection showing then-corporal David C. Yakey of the 25th Wisconsin wearing his Whipple's Patent Cap.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
This appear to be a description of the uniforms and Whipple hats being worn by a unidentified Wisconsin regiment.

Detroit Daily Tribune, from Washington by special correspondence of the Detroit Tribune, Jun 26, July 1 1861, p. 2, col.2. "Their uniform is very objectionable, it being heavy and encumbersome. Their caps are decidedly bad: they are heavy hot things with a visor before and behind which gives then an award and unsoldierly appearance. These soldiers’ caps are about the meanest things inflected upon our volunteers. They offer no protection to the head whatever and why it is that our men are thus sent into the field with their heads so poorly protected from the rays of the sun is past my comprehension."
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
This appear to be a description of the uniforms and Whipple hats being worn by a unidentified Wisconsin regiment.

Detroit Daily Tribune, from Washington by special correspondence of the Detroit Tribune, Jun 26, July 1 1861, p. 2, col.2. "Their uniform is very objectionable, it being heavy and encumbersome. Their caps are decidedly bad: they are heavy hot things with a visor before and behind which gives then an award and unsoldierly appearance. These soldiers’ caps are about the meanest things inflected upon our volunteers. They offer no protection to the head whatever and why it is that our men are thus sent into the field with their heads so poorly protected from the rays of the sun is past my comprehension."

I'm especially interested in that account because prior to my identification of Yakey I had the distinct impression that Whipple's headgear was a peculiarity of the Eastern theater - most identified subjects seem to have come from New England states like Vermont. It's possible they were as unpopular there as this article indicates, and were fobbed off on the western states, which seem to have been low priority where arms and equipment were concerned.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
James m Loomis, a Chicago hatter, made some of these hat/Havelocks for Illinois regiments. Loomis had these made up in New York and outfitted the 10th,11th Infantry Regiments and perhaps other Illinois Infantry Regiments. Wisconsin may have purchased their hat/Havelocks from Loomis as well.

A member of the 10th Illinois called them "ugly as hell". The 11th Illinois dislike their hat/havelocks Oct. 11 1861 "Drew new hats. We Don't like them." They replaced them in less than two weeks, Oct. 24 1861"we bought red caps to wear".
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
The subject of the Havelock hat was brought up again in another thread, so I though I might see if anyone had new information.
 

RebelHeart

Corporal
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Location
Southern New Jersey
I'm wondering if some of those hats were a form of unit punishment, like "you fell out of formation during the march so now you have to wear this hideous chapeau in a photo."

Seriously, I think some of those guys ran to the front of the skirmish line in hopes that the enemy would shoot the hat off their heads. :smile:
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
While we are on the subject of hats, What the heck kind of hat is this? Looks like he borrowed it from the Wicked Witch of the West!
s12-jpg.jpg
What is really interesting about this pic, is the M1841 Rifleman's Pouch and Flask, an extremely rare accouterment that is rarely found today, it is very incongruent in the picture since it would not have been used with the Sharps carbine. No doubt he and his pards went to a studio and there were either props or they pooled weapons for a fierce picture.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
What us the difference between flaps and brim of a hat, both would bother about the same.
 

Northern Light

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
What is really interesting about this pic, is the M1841 Rifleman's Pouch and Flask, an extremely rare accouterment that is rarely found today, it is very incongruent in the picture since it would not have been used with the Sharps carbine. No doubt he and his pards went to a studio and there were either props or they pooled weapons for a fierce picture.
The more I look at this picture, the odder it seems. The hat is odd enough, but his jacket is certainly different, as well. Does anyone know if it is from any known regiment? His weapons are interesting too. The sword, knife on his chest is vet ornate, like a giant letter opener. The one attached to his belt looks like the handle of my silver carving set, and oh, my! Is his fly undone?:redface:
 

Northern Light

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
James m Loomis, a Chicago hatter, made some of these hat/Havelocks for Illinois regiments. Loomis had these made up in New York and outfitted the 10th,11th Infantry Regiments and perhaps other Illinois Infantry Regiments. Wisconsin may have purchased their hat/Havelocks from Loomis as well.

A member of the 10th Illinois called them "ugly as hell". The 11th Illinois dislike their hat/havelocks Oct. 11 1861 "Drew new hats. We Don't like them." They replaced them in less than two weeks, Oct. 24 1861"we bought red caps to wear".
Oh yes, throw away the practical hats with the brim and buy RED hats so the enemy will be able to see you even better!:nah disagree:
 

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
What is really interesting about this pic, is the M1841 Rifleman's Pouch and Flask, an extremely rare accouterment that is rarely found today, it is very incongruent in the picture since it would not have been used with the Sharps carbine. No doubt he and his pards went to a studio and there were either props or they pooled weapons for a fierce picture.
I just saw this for the first time this morning. I wonder if this picture has an identifying name on it anywhere. I ask because he appears to be a Missouri guerrilla--or is pretending to be one. He is wearing a fairly typical example of a guerrilla shirt. As for the original question about his hat, I think it's just a high-crowned hat that he has pinched into a full length, front to back sharp crease on top.
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
The more I look at this picture, the odder it seems. The hat is odd enough, but his jacket is certainly different, as well. Does anyone know if it is from any known regiment? His weapons are interesting too. The sword, knife on his chest is vet ornate, like a giant letter opener. The one attached to his belt looks like the handle of my silver carving set, and oh, my! Is his fly undone?:redface:

This could be the subject of a thread by itself: During the Revolution and War of 1812 men's pantaloons or trowsers tended to have what was known as a narrow or short fall, meaning the flap in front was relatively narrow; by the time of the Mexican War it had become a broad fall, meaning it was now the width of the entire front of the garment, virtually hip-to-hip. In both cases, they were held in place by buttons in the corners of the flap and along the sides. In the 1850's there was a move away from the flap-front trowsers to the more familiar button fly we know today, the buttons of course now replaced by zippers which weren't invented until after the Civil War. During the transition, however, the new garments were considered SCANDALOUS and highly improper, since it was thought the fly directed attention and the eye to that particular area!
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
* OFFICIAL *
CWT PRESENTER
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Chickamauga 2018
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
I have been lucky enough to locate photos of about 45 men of the 16th Georgia - many of them in uniform - but only one wearing a what appears to be a havelock. I understand that the ladies back home, particularly in Savannah, made havelocks for the Confederate soldiers. They were distributed to troops in the vicinity. But these guys of the 16th were sent to Richmond early on and would have missed out on that gift back home. I have often wondered if they were sent to Georgia troops in Richmond as well? Unfortunately, the image of the 16th Georgia soldier wearing a havelock is cropped and I have no idea who has the original of the image.

Nevertheless, meet Augustus Parks Ellison of Company F 16th GA Vol Inf. Augustus Parks Ellison enlisted with his father, Alexander Parks Ellison (3d Sgt Co F) his brother, Zachariah Thompson Ellison, and six cousins.

He was wounded and captured at Crampton's Gap on Sept 14, 1862; sent to a Union Field Hospital at Burkittsville where his left arm was amputated near the shoulder joint.

Any info about his havelock appreciated
Augustus Parks Ellison Co F.jpg
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
I have been lucky enough to locate photos of about 45 men of the 16th Georgia - many of them in uniform - but only one wearing a what appears to be a havelock. I understand that the ladies back home, particularly in Savannah, made havelocks for the Confederate soldiers. They were distributed to troops in the vicinity. But these guys of the 16th were sent to Richmond early on and would have missed out on that gift back home. I have often wondered if they were sent to Georgia troops in Richmond as well? Unfortunately, the image of the 16th Georgia soldier wearing a havelock is cropped and I have no idea who has the original of the image.

Nevertheless, meet Augustus Parks Ellison of Company F 16th GA Vol Inf. Augustus Parks Ellison enlisted with his father, Alexander Parks Ellison (3d Sgt Co F) his brother, Zachariah Thompson Ellison, and six cousins.

He was wounded and captured at Crampton's Gap on Sept 14, 1862; sent to a Union Field Hospital at Burkittsville where his left arm was amputated near the shoulder joint.

Any info about his havelock appreciated
View attachment 95973

I am guessing this is a Corsican cap or Sardinian cap. This is sort of like a pointed cap or bag top cap. This of Santa's cap but of very thin material. These were very popular with men in the Confederacy, but some Union troops wore them as well but often as an of duty smoking cap.
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
* OFFICIAL *
CWT PRESENTER
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Chickamauga 2018
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Wow!~ Thanks @major bill I had no idea. I guess since no other members of the regiment are seen wearing this, it wasnt standard issue? At least not for the 16th regiment? Or maybe none of the others liked it?
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Wow!~ Thanks @major bill I had no idea. I guess since no other members of the regiment are seen wearing this, it wasnt standard issue? At least not for the 16th regiment? Or maybe none of the others liked it?

Probably more of a company thing or a semi official thing in a regiment. Note one or both of the men wear it over their forage cap.
 
Top