Restricted VMI Keeps Stonewall

Cdoug96

Corporal
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Location
Michigan, United States

It seems that VMI still realizes that by far it's most well known member is Stonewall Jackson and chose to keep the statue because of that reason, in addition to others. However, the campaign to remove the statue is still ongoing despite this refusal and I doubt we have heard the last of this.
 

luinrina

2nd Lieutenant
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Location
Germany
Has anyone else noticed that these articles never say anything about Jackson teaching Sunday school to black people? That he broke the law by doing so? Or that one of his slaves was a child who he adored and played with? He's always condemned as a slave owner and general for the rebellion.

VMI's history will always be linked with Stonewall Jackson, the cadets at New Market and the Civil War in general since so many alumnis fought for the Confederates. Maybe VMI's leadership should consider taking the first year students to the Stonewall House where they will learn more about Jackson as a person, who he was as a private man and what he did for the black people of Lexington.
 

Stone in the wall

2nd Lieutenant
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Location
Blue Ridge Mountains, Jefferson County WV
Has anyone else noticed that these articles never say anything about Jackson teaching Sunday school to black people? That he broke the law by doing so? Or that one of his slaves was a child who he adored and played with? He's always condemned as a slave owner and general for the rebellion.

VMI's history will always be linked with Stonewall Jackson, the cadets at New Market and the Civil War in general since so many alumnis fought for the Confederates. Maybe VMI's leadership should consider taking the first year students to the Stonewall House where they will learn more about Jackson as a person, who he was as a private man and what he did for the black people of Lexington.
The book Stonewall Jackson; The Black Mans Friend was interesting, with good pictures. Also not much said of the bond with his servant Jim Lewis, it's possible they new each other before the war in Lexington. After Jackson's wounding, while at Guinea, Jim was one of the very few allowed to enter Jackson's room at anytime. He was part of the Stonewall funeral procession's at Richmond and Lexington. He then served Sandie Pendleton until Pendleton's death, Jim then returned to Lexington and soon died.
 

Paul Yancey

Sergeant
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
Location
Kentucky
The traditions and history of VMI are well known to everyone. If one is opposed to this history and tradition it raises the obvious question - Why in the world would they choose to attend VMI. I strongly suspect that the great majority of alumni and current cadets favor keeping Jackson on campus.
 

NH Civil War Gal

Captain
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Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 5, 2017
The book Stonewall Jackson; The Black Mans Friend was interesting, with good pictures. Also not much said of the bond with his servant Jim Lewis, it's possible they new each other before the war in Lexington. After Jackson's wounding, while at Guinea, Jim was one of the very few allowed to enter Jackson's room at anytime. He was part of the Stonewall funeral procession's at Richmond and Lexington. He then served Sandie Pendleton until Pendleton's death, Jim then returned to Lexington and soon died.

I remember the docent at the Jackson House told me something that started to get me to see a different facet of Jackson. He might have known of this older slave from church or not, but there was a large group of slaves being sent South to the cotton fields. For some of them the trip alone would be death and for others the work alone their in the fields would be death and they knew it.

An older slave woman knowing she was being sold off to the cotton fields in the delta and going to be placed in this group to walk there, went to Jackson and begged him to buy her and told him that she would be the best cook he ever had. And what surprised me was, he bought her to keep her out of that group. He didn’t really need another cook but he did it. And she cooked her heart out for him. He left shortly for the war and she only lived a couple more years but he was concerned when she died and paid for her to have a funeral in Lexington.
 

jcaesar

Private
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Northam just opened up an official investigation into VMI and its racial history. As long as VMI is public I doubt they will be able to continue pretty much anything related to the war and the institutions connection to it for long.
 
Last edited:

Quaama

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Location
Port Macquarie, Australia

It seems that VMI still realizes that by far it's most well known member is Stonewall Jackson and chose to keep the statue because of that reason, in addition to others. However, the campaign to remove the statue is still ongoing despite this refusal and I doubt we have heard the last of this.

Looks like you were right in view of the information provided by @jcaesar above.
 

CowCavalry

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 17, 2017
Has anyone else noticed that these articles never say anything about Jackson teaching Sunday school to black people? That he broke the law by doing so? Or that one of his slaves was a child who he adored and played with? He's always condemned as a slave owner and general for the rebellion.

VMI's history will always be linked with Stonewall Jackson, the cadets at New Market and the Civil War in general since so many alumnis fought for the Confederates. Maybe VMI's leadership should consider taking the first year students to the Stonewall House where they will learn more about Jackson as a person, who he was as a private man and what he did for the black people of Lexington.
Political Correctness demands a broad brush in which to paint with. Things must be dumbed down and simplified; good vs. bad.
 

PapaReb

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Arkansas CSA occupied
The goal from this point forward is to make every effort to instill a love of and a thirst for history in our children and grandchildren. Apparently, little or none of the visual reminders of much of our history will be available for future generations, but there is hope if we do our part. History can be passed to the future thru us, our words and the historical documentation that many have acquired thru the years. Guard it, preserve it and pass it on to those who will continue to do so.
 
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