Recent Find Thomas Griswold 1862 Replica?

Geowassung

Private
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Gday mates and Miladies.
I am brand new to this group. The more I read, the more excited about it I get. My Red (wife) thins it's "cute" that I am a "Cadet" lol.
Anyway, I am a lifelong lover of all things Pointy Things. I have always wanted a Civil War Saber (or Sabre). About 3 years ago I went into this pretty good size antique store called Laney's in Waynesboro virginia. I found what looked like a replica of a civil war saber but in really solid condition. You need to restoring. But the bottom line was I didn't have the $200 they were asking for it. Last week, I turned 65 decided that I wanted to get that sword if it was still there. Which I did not believe that it would be. Much to my excitement it was and the price had been marked down to 100 and something. I ended up getting the sword for $90. I am still pretty sure that it's a replica but a pretty impressive one at that. Most replicas that I have seen aren't put together well they're definitely not solid or something that would be considered "battle ready". I don't want to even begin restoration until I learn more and do more research about it. My daughter and I spent a couple of hours the other night googling everything we could find and I think I found an image of one similar but still haven't totally identified it I think it is a officers light cavalry sword. Replica or not, this sword is definitely battle ready.
Attached all the pics that I've taken of it and I'm looking forward to any information or or thoughts and ideas on how to go about the restoration.
Apologies if I loaded to many pics.i wasn't sure of the protocol.
Cheers,
Geo

20210309_100920.jpg


20210309_100906.jpg


20210309_100906.jpg


20210309_100852.jpg


20210309_100839.jpg


20210309_100815.jpg


20210309_100806.jpg


20210309_100751.jpg


20210309_100731.jpg


20210309_100654.jpg


20210309_100647.jpg


20210309_100637.jpg


20210309_100628.jpg
 

gjpratt

Corporal
Joined
Apr 14, 2019
First of all, welcome to the forum and keep your enthusiasm up! There is no way to sugar coat this, unfortunately. What you have is neither genuine nor a replica. It is a fantasy piece. Griswold did not make a sword of this pattern -- for that matter, no Confederate sword maker has swords of this pattern. The sword and scabbard have been artificially (i.e., chemically) aged. The die-stamps are all incorrect. The blade appears to be flat -- not a Griswold product. And although I am not certain, but from the one photo I don't think the scabbard has a characteristic lap seam. The only reason to restore it is for your personal gratification.

Take this as a learning experience and do not be discouraged. As these things go, this is a minor setback. Believe me, I have made worse acquisitions and more than once. I daresay we all have. If you like Confederate swords, load up on the the reference books, look at the plethora of online sites of dealers and other resources. Learning all you can about these Pointy Things is itself a rewarding process. I recommend Albaugh's Photographic Supplement of Confederate Swords (the last edition with the addendum) and Hartzler's book on Presentation Swords for starters. And take heart -- you will be able to find a good original CW saber with time and persistence.
 

Geowassung

Private
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
First of all, welcome to the forum and keep your enthusiasm up! There is no way to sugar coat this, unfortunately. What you have is neither genuine nor a replica. It is a fantasy piece. Griswold did not make a sword of this pattern -- for that matter, no Confederate sword maker has swords of this pattern. The sword and scabbard have been artificially (i.e., chemically) aged. The die-stamps are all incorrect. The blade appears to be flat -- not a Griswold product. And although I am not certain, but from the one photo I don't think the scabbard has a characteristic lap seam. The only reason to restore it is for your personal gratification.

Take this as a learning experience and do not be discouraged. As these things go, this is a minor setback. Believe me, I have made worse acquisitions and more than once. I daresay we all have. If you like Confederate swords, load up on the the reference books, look at the plethora of online sites of dealers and other resources. Learning all you can about these Pointy Things is itself a rewarding process. I recommend Albaugh's Photographic Supplement of Confederate Swords (the last edition with the addendum) and Hartzler's book on Presentation Swords for starters. And take heart -- you will be able to find a good original CW saber with time and persistence.
gjpratt,
Thanks so much for your feedback.
Replica or Fantasy sword doesn't matter to me and I am not discouraged at all. After seeing some of the prices of originals, It's gonna be a while before I ever get one.
I agree about the die-stamps. They definitely appear to be Hand stamped. The stamps are fascinating though. the *1862*, the number 6 near the hilt, and if you are holding it with the point up, there is a number 9 stamped about a foot from the tip. The blade, however is not flat nor stainless steel. The scabbard according to what little I have found (to date) on Griswolds, is not brass. I have purchased and played with Fantasy swords in my younger years. However, all are usually cheaply made, rarely full tang, and most do not have a solid feel at all. This one appears to be very well made, and very solid. I am not sure about being chemically aged. It sure looks like some of my grandfathers' rusty old tool. After I do a bit more research on how best to restore old metal and Brass, I will know more I am still very excited about my "Birthday Sword" and will share my progress with the group.
With that said, since it is probably not an original or even a replica, is it even appropriate as a thread on this forum?

Again, Thank you so much for your input, and I will definitely take a look at the references that you shared.

Cheers,

geo
 

Jeff in Ohio

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Thanks, and I have considered that. However, I do love shiny brass things.
Cheers

Thank you.

When this was created in recent times, it was shiny and new.
It has been rusted up to create the appearance of age.
If you want a shiny looking sword, why not buy a newly made one that is still shiny?
A "restoration" of a rusted relic won't look as attractive as a new shiny one or this aged looking one - you'll get the worst of both combined, a sword that looks worse than a new one, and worse than a rusted one!
Think of it this way - we all need winter projects, but it is springtime, and so you might delay a "restoration" project until autumn, and think this over and see if this sword as it is now doesn't grow on you!
 
Last edited:

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
@Geowassung not all of us are top-notch identifiers, but there are a few of us that know next to nothing. Aesthetically being of the sort that looks like it hung in the barn after some kid had many joyful hours banging it on posts and pickets, and maybe barbed-wire, make a good go of it. I for one was thinking of where it will finally reside; in the hallway, the den, the umbrella bin? Now think of the future when some suiter calls, and her beau has not quite filled out all his charm. A good ice-breaker could be hanging there on the wall, and you could sort of hint at whatever fantasy might help it melt. Have fun with it, that's all.
Lubliner.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Apologies if I loaded to many pics.i wasn't sure of the protocol.

Not in the least , we love pics !

Last week, I turned 65 decided that I wanted to get that sword if it was still there. Which I did not believe that it would be. Much to my excitement it was and the price had been marked down to 100 and something. I ended up getting the sword for $90. I am still pretty sure that it's a replica but a pretty impressive one at that.
I understand ! :bounce:

Original or replica, at our age we should buy anything that makes us happy !

Happy Birthday ... and welcome to CivilWarTalk.
 

Geowassung

Private
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
@Geowassung not all of us are top-notch identifiers, but there are a few of us that know next to nothing. Aesthetically being of the sort that looks like it hung in the barn after some kid had many joyful hours banging it on posts and pickets, and maybe barbed-wire, make a good go of it. I for one was thinking of where it will finally reside; in the hallway, the den, the umbrella bin? Now think of the future when some suiter calls, and her beau has not quite filled out all his charm. A good ice-breaker could be hanging there on the wall, and you could sort of hint at whatever fantasy might help it melt. Have fun with it, that's all.
Lubliner.
My exact thoughts. We are close to the same age, so I am guessing you remember Army, and Cowboy and Indians (please no offence intended, it was the 50s), and sometimes civil war with all the kids in the neighborhood. I would always imagine myself whacking away at the bad guys with a cavalry saber. My 19-year-old daughter wants me to mount it with my other swords on one of the Kitchen walls. My Red (wife) is not enthused about that idea. lol And Yes! i have used that trick on a suitor or two of my daughters with the first "real sword" that I made. It is frickin hilarious to see the bulging of the eyes. Regardless, I will have fun with it. Thanks.
Not in the least , we love pics !


I understand ! :bounce:

Original or replica, at our age we should buy anything that makes us happy !

Happy Birthday ... and welcome to CivilWarTalk.
Thank you mate. Best chuckle of the day.
An old friend message me on my birthday and he asked, now what the hell you going to do? My response was, any **** thing that I want to.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
For what it's worth, I have an original artillery shell from Shiloh on display within the shelves of my living room.
(deactivated of course)

While it could pass as a perfectly crafted replica, an average person would never know the difference.

Most people don't even notice this little iron ball.

The very few that do, realize it for what it is.
( a 12 pound case shot round, with 50 percent of the Bormann fuse intact).
 

Geowassung

Private
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
For what it's worth, I have an original artillery shell from Shiloh on display within the shelves of my living room.
(deactivated of course)

While it could pass as a perfectly crafted replica, an average person would never know the difference.

Most people don't even notice this little iron ball.

The very few that do, realize it for what it is.
( a 12 pound case shot round, with 50 percent of the Bormann fuse intact).
I do have an unrelated question.

I see that it appears that most of the usernames are more identifiers than names, (as I did), with rank below the username. When replying in a thread, or just conversing or chatting; what is proper protocol? Does one reply to the username, it to the rank?
In general, most threads that I have looked at seem pleasently casual. I am just curious and wouldn't want to offend.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
I am guessing you remember Army, and Cowboy and Indians
That's what we grew up "playing" as well.

Sun Up to Sun Down during the Sumer.

In the Winter months, it was always about "playing" the Battle of the Bulge.

Oh yeah, and also building "forts" .

NO GIRLS ALLOWED !

:bounce:

Well . . . that was until we were about twelve.

:laugh:
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
I do have an unrelated question.

I see that it appears that most of the usernames are more identifiers than names, (as I did), with rank below the username. When replying in a thread, or just conversing or chatting; what is proper protocol? Does one reply to the username, it to the rank?
In general, most threads that I have looked at seem pleasently casual. I am just curious and wouldn't want to offend.
Forget ranks.

Ranks are only based on the number of posts by a member.

User names are what most use when responding to another member in a thread.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
That's about the age that I stopped getting into fights the Georgie porgie kissd the girls... Tease. I decided that kissing the girls sounded much better than it had before.
Amazingly enough, I stopped getting teased with that. Lol.
LOL !

Yep, one day all of the girls supposedly had cooties.
(back then I didn't even know what a cootie was)

Then in about the sixth grade, we forgot about "cooties" and fell in love with all the girls.

:smile:
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
... Replica or Fantasy sword doesn't matter to me and I am not discouraged at all. After seeing some of the prices of originals, It's gonna be a while before I ever get one.
I agree about the die-stamps. They definitely appear to be Hand stamped. The stamps are fascinating though. the *1862*, the number 6 near the hilt, and if you are holding it with the point up, there is a number 9 stamped about a foot from the tip. The blade, however is not flat nor stainless steel. The scabbard according to what little I have found (to date) on Griswolds, is not brass. I have purchased and played with Fantasy swords in my younger years. However, all are usually cheaply made, rarely full tang, and most do not have a solid feel at all. This one appears to be very well made, and very solid. I am not sure about being chemically aged. It sure looks like some of my grandfathers' rusty old tool. After I do a bit more research on how best to restore old metal and Brass, I will know more I am still very excited about my "Birthday Sword" and will share my progress with the group.
With that said, since it is probably not an original or even a replica, is it even appropriate as a thread on this forum?

Again, Thank you so much for your input, and I will definitely take a look at the references that you shared.

Cheers,

geo
Hi, geo - welcome to the forums! Reproduction swords took a turn for the better with the advent of reenacting and the need for swords/sabers that would both stand up to actual use and look and feel at least moderately authentic. Personally I always preferred to carry an original, even if I had to buy a repro scabbard for it. Once at Gettysburg I had just arrived to serve as captain of the smallest company and was called on by our regimental commander to participate in a sort of rehearsal for the evening muster, even though I was still in civvies, a T-shirt and shorts! All my gear was still packed, so I grabbed my Hardee hat and borrowed another officer's reproduction officer's sword for the exercise - that thing was like carrying a lead weight compared to my original! Although it has a restored rewrapped grip and now a reproduction scabbard and sword knot I feel as though it's MY "original" and a veteran like me of many memorable reenactments and other events. For now your reproduction will serve to tide you over until you decide exactly what avenue in collecting you wish to pursue - and the price you paid really wasn't too bad for a serviceable reproduction or fantasy piece.
 
Top