The year that was.

jgoodguy

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#1
We started the year with the usual it was slavery, no it was not scrimmaging. We ended, IMHO, with a bit more nuanced view amid the scrimmaging.

It was slavery for sure, but something happened besides the fleets of Rhode Islanders bringing in illicit slaves contracted by Southerners--illicit cargo like slaves has a buyer in hand before taking the risk--can't just show up at a Southern port with all the law enforcement about and gold has to be on hand ahead of time, not a good thing to go to the bank and ask for loans on illicit cargo and local law enforcement as to paid off not only to ignore the landing but the fact that the titles are defective and the slaves speak African languages and not American. So yea, it was contracted ahead of time.

At the eve of the Revolution, slavery was the natural order of things and the coalition of rebels was one about slavery. By the end of the revolution Northerners had second thoughts about this freedom thing and maybe slavery wasn't all that good such that as the price of Union the Southern coalition demanded to be in charge of the nation figuring that between the population in the South being greater than the North and the extra boost from the 3/5 clause the South would be.

Things did not work out that way. The lack of slavery in the North attracted immigrants and industry boomed. The cities became crowded and one way to avoid riots and adverse elections was to send the excess population West to farm. The Free Labor, Free Men, Free Soil movement was born. The South became concerned. The North developed a different civilization from the revolutionary days. The South for the life of the republic has threatened to leave if their demands were not met. In 1860, their demands were not met. The South left. Unfortunately, it was too late. The North was too strong, the South was too arrogant and the North was not abiding the leaving.

Yes, it was slavery, but it also was that the 7,500 year slavery labor ideology was fading fast. There would be no allies this time. The Confederacy was simply too late, its dependence on slave labor put its technology and industry to far behind, its political infrastructure unable to forge a strong nation. Caliviers, slaves, and peasants had gone out of date.

The root cause of the Civil War is Slavery and things changed.
 

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#3
The quill of the pen beckons to write as does the tongue beckon to speak. A certain caste of Aristocracy that gazed over productive fields being worked by servitude died along with the last flower of the slavery plant. Its time had come to die, but it got trampled into dust, and the Aristocratic Host that once had the world's gold in his pocket, it also turned to dust. And unto dust we all return.
Lubliner.
 
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#4
The idea that the The War for Confederate Independence was a conflict between free labor and held labor, with all the attendant implications of mechanization and modernization opposing stasis and obsolescence, is commonplace, but utterly false. Indeed, if the war had been between held labor and free labor, the CSA would have undoubtedly achieved its independence. Abraham Lincoln put it this way:

"I think to lose Kentucky is nearly the same as to lose the whole game. Kentucky gone, we can not hold Missouri, nor, as I think, Maryland. These all against us, and the job on our hands is too large for us. We would as well consent to separation at once, including the surrender of this capitol."

But as we know, the war was not fought between free labor states and held labor states. It was fought between the United States of America, where slavery was perfectly lawful, and the Confederate States of America, where slavery was also lawful.
 
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#5
The idea that the The War for Confederate Independence was a conflict between free labor and held labor, with all the attendant implications of mechanization and modernization opposing stasis and obsolescence, is commonplace, but utterly false. Indeed, if the war had been between held labor and free labor, the CSA would have undoubtedly achieved its independence. Abraham Lincoln put it this way:

"I think to lose Kentucky is nearly the same as to lose the whole game. Kentucky gone, we can not hold Missouri, nor, as I think, Maryland. These all against us, and the job on our hands is too large for us. We would as well consent to separation at once, including the surrender of this capitol."

But as we know, the war was not fought between free labor states and held labor states. It was fought between the United States of America, where slavery was perfectly lawful, and the Confederate States of America, where slavery was also lawful.
Looks like we want to keep beating the same dead horse yet again
 

WJC

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#7
the war was not fought between free labor states and held labor states. It was fought between the United States of America, where slavery was perfectly lawful, and the Confederate States of America, where slavery was also lawful.
Or, more correctly "the United States of America, where slavery was lawful in some states, banned in others and being phased out in still others and rebels intent on preserving and protecting the institution of slavery in perpetuity."
 
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#10
Thank you.

I said that slavery was perfectly legal in the United States, just as it was in the Confederate States; it is a true statement. And I agree, the federal government had no right to interfere with slavery under the U.S. Constitution. It was a matter left to the states.
 
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#11
Territorial disputes over claims to be free soil or slave had a major impact on deciding States' Rights, and with the Confederacy desiring the right to secede, or make new territories open to enslaved settlements, and others wanting nothing but freedom was enough to raise Cain's dead horse. And we still can't put it down to this day!
 



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