The Victorian Easter Bunny

Northern Light

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
That's true. They'll tell us that their bunny is much better than the American version.
It was bigger and wasn't all dressed up in silly clothes.
160317-easter-bunny-evil.jpg
 

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
I've always wondered how the Brits got a rabbit mixed up with colored Easter eggs. Are either of them traditional symbols of Easter from bygone eras?
My response has no real substance, but I just read your post and then I looked at your avatar featuring Gen. Sherman. Naturally, my imagination went immediately to Uncle Billy saying what you posted, and I just started cracking up! I couldn't help myself. I hope this doesn't offend you.
 

Jimklag

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Location
Chicagoland
My response has no real substance, but I just read your post and then I looked at your avatar featuring Gen. Sherman. Naturally, my imagination went immediately to Uncle Billy saying what you posted, and I just started cracking up! I couldn't help myself. I hope this doesn't offend you.
Absolutely not. I think Uncle Billy would be amazed and gratified that he made somebody laugh.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Holy Cow! It was the Germans! Calling @Schwallanscher and @2/241 !

"According to some sources, the Easter bunny first arrived in America in the 1700s with German immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania and transported their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase” or “Oschter Haws.” Their children made nests in which this creature could lay its colored eggs." Source
My German mother used to make coloured eggs for Easter and we would help her. Loved that tradition :bounce:
 

tbuckley

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Back in the 1950s here in eastern Ohio, we had to buy the more expensive white eggs to color for Easter. Back then brown eggs were cheaper but they weren't too good for coloring.
 
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