The Rogers House Site

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civilken

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Jul 25, 2013
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Maybe you can fill me in on what I am missing just this picture.
 
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dlavin

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Jun 1, 2015
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North Balt Co., MD
The barns/farms/houses of Sharpsburg is a really good thread in the Antietam battle forum. Wonder if someone would consider doing that here....lots of material for sure!
 

Tom Elmore

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Peter and Susan Rogers lived in a single-story log house. Josephine Miller, born October 9, 1836, was their granddaughter. In October 1863, she married William J. Slyder (from the Slyder farm down the road), and moved to Ohio. Josephine remained alone in the house during the battle, bringing fresh-baked bread on July 2 to Union soldiers posted nearby, in particular the men of the 1st Massachusetts; afterwards she did the same for the wounded of both sides. When her flour supply ran low, six men from the regiment brought back three sacks of flour from General Sickles' commissary stores, along with raisins, currants and a whole sheep. In July 1886, Josephine returned to Gettysburg for the dedication of the 1st Massachusetts monument, at the invitation of the veterans, who paid her trip expenses. The men carried out the old stove that was still in the house, and a photograph was taken with Josephine standing next to the stove and monument. She died on January 9, 1911 in Troy, Ohio and was buried in Riverside Cemetery.

[sources: W. C. Storrick, The Battle of Gettysburg; July 2007, Civil War Women Blog; Greg Coco, A Vast Sea of Misery, who quotes from a Gettysburg paper of July 6, 1880 and February 1891; Rosalie Yoakum, Gettysburg Heroine Josephine Miller Slyder, Dayton Daily News.]

It was shortly before 7 p.m. on July 2 when the left flank of Wilcox's Alabamians and the right flank of Lang's Floridians passed close to the Rogers House - the right flank of the 5th Florida just skirted the house on the north side as they drove the 1st Massachusetts back upon the 26th Pennsylvania, and routed them both. A half hour later the Confederates were repulsed, and a group took refuge around the house, where they were confronted and captured by Company A of the 13th Vermont - five companies of the 13th Vermont had reached the Emmitsburg Road between the Rogers and Codori farm buildings in a counter-charge, and Company A was sent to clear out the opposition around the Rogers house.
 
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Tom Elmore

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William Price Shreve served as an aide-de-camp to Col. Hiram Berdan. On the second day he supervised two companies of the First U.S. Sharpshooters, B (New York) and H (Wisconsin), who were posted on the picket line east of the Rogers place. Shreve wrote: "I took the house for my 'headquarters.' It was simply a log house with two rooms on the lower floor. A shed, built to shelter a cow that had most likely been sent to safer quarters, made a hitching place for my horse, who found some cornstalks to chew on. The occupants of the house were an old man and his daughter and they were soon carrying on the baking business. As many loaves were ordered as they could bake in a day and when a stop was put to their traffic there must have been a great many orders unfilled. With an eye to the hereafter I secured a loaf and strapped it, still hot as it came from the oven, in my overcoat behind the saddle." [Shreve Papers, McCain Library and Archives, University of Southern Mississippi]
 
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