History The Gingersnap

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Today, July 1 is National Gingersnap Day. Gingersnaps go back for centuries. It dates back to the Lebkuchen, which were probably invented by Medieval Monks in Franconia, Germany. The earliest written recipe for them were records of Lebkuchen baking in 1296 in Ulm and 1395 in Nurenberg.

Gingersnaps came to America with English Colonists. They were made from recipes passed down for generations.

I have previously posted Mrs. Jefferson Davis' recipe for gingersnaps. They were always enjoyed in the White House of the Confederacy.

Another recipe for gingersnaps is from San Francisco chocolatier, Michael Recchiuti. It is at:
http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/cookies/cookies2/ginger-snaps-recipe.asp

Enjoy some gingersnaps today. The spiciness of the ginger and the richness of molasses pairs well with tea and coffee. Colonial tea services included cucumber sandwiches, cakes and cookies, including gingersnaps.
 

Mint Julep

Sergeant
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Except for the Christmas Holiday it is the only cookie we allow.
 
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Blessmag

Captain
Joined
Jun 19, 2010
Location
Minnesota
Thought this was who you meant:
150px-Sherman_young.jpg


Fellow cadet William Rosecrans would later remember Sherman at West Point as "one of the brightest and most popular fellows" and "a bright-eyed, red-headed fellow, who was always prepared for a lark of any kind."[12]
 

diane

Retired User
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Location
State of Jefferson
diane you are so right. Gingersnaps made into piecrust is delicious. There is a wonderful pumpkin pie with gingersnap crust. The recipe is on internet. It is well worth trying.

I haven't tried pumpkin, but have tried sweet potato and eggnog fillings. Very exceptional! With the eggnog I used store bought gingersnaps - I do prefer the moister home made ones. :thumbsup:
 

John Winn

Major
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
State of Jefferson
Gingersnaps were my father's favorite - along with buttermilk - but as a child I didn't like either (and still can't drink buttermilk). I'd never seen anybody else who ate them or who drank buttermilk. Thus, it was when my father suggested that I leave some gingersnaps and buttermilk out for Santa that I knew that Mr. Claus was a myth and it was dad who ate those cookies.
 

28thNewYork

First Sergeant
Silver Patron
Joined
Feb 21, 2014
Location
Atlanta
My mother (who turns 94 on Friday) still makes a variation of the original Lebkuchen, one of the pie and cookie recipes she learned from her mother. Unfortunately, she never mastered the cake part of my grandmother's cooking repertoire, which included a fruit kuchen that tastes akin to a ginger snap (but much less intense) in which brown sugar, cinnamon, cardamon, nutmeg, and cumin were used (I know--I have the list of ingredients, but not the proportions).
 

Mrs. V

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 5, 2017
Oh, I love gingersnaps! My Mother in law used to always have some on her table. She liked a particular brand, which I have not seen in ages. One of the nice things about them is their size. Perfect for the under 3 foot crowd.

Hmm..pie crust huh. Never thought of that. I wonder if you could do a pumpkin bar recipe? Imwill have to go looking and baking!
 

Jimklag

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Location
Chicagoland
Today, July 1 is National Gingersnap Day. Gingersnaps go back for centuries. It dates back to the Lebkuchen, which were probably invented by Medieval Monks in Franconia, Germany. The earliest written recipe for them were records of Lebkuchen baking in 1296 in Ulm and 1395 in Nurenberg.

Gingersnaps came to America with English Colonists. They were made from recipes passed down for generations.

I have previously posted Mrs. Jefferson Davis' recipe for gingersnaps. They were always enjoyed in the White House of the Confederacy.

Another recipe for gingersnaps is from San Francisco chocolatier, Michael Recchiuti. It is at:
http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/cookies/cookies2/ginger-snaps-recipe.asp

Enjoy some gingersnaps today. The spiciness of the ginger and the richness of molasses pairs well with tea and coffee. Colonial tea services included cucumber sandwiches, cakes and cookies, including gingersnaps.
Ginger snaps are the kings of cookies. Definitely coffee's favorite cookie.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Location
central NC
I love bread pudding and gingersnap cookies so I thought I’d share this recipe in honor of National Gingersnap Day. This is a recipe my grandma made, but I’m sure there are variations all across the Internet. The addition of the bourbon butter sauce is one I modified from a Martha Stewart recipe. Trust me. If Eleanor Rose can make this, so can you.


Gingersnap Bread Pudding:

1 cup dried apricots (store bought package)
½ c. candied ginger, cut into strips or diced
1 tbsp. bourbon
9-10 cups of cubed bread, preferably Challah
2 cups gingersnap cookies, broken into small pieces
5 eggs
3 cups whole milk
2 cups heavy cream
½ cups sugar
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. cinnamon
¼ tsp. nutmeg

Bourbon Butter Sauce:

½ c. Butter
1 cup brown sugar
¼ cup bourbon
2 egg yolks

1. Preheat oven to 325°. Butter a 9"x13" baking pan.
2. Combine dried apricots and ginger in a small bowl. Add bourbon, stir. Allow to stand while you prep the rest of the bread pudding, stirring occasionally.
3. In a large bowl, combine Challah bread and 1 cup of gingersnaps. Set aside.
4. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, cream, sugar, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Add the soaked apricots and ginger.
5. Pour liquid ingredients over the bread and gingersnaps. Evenly mix (use your hands) and transfer to buttered baking pan. Sprinkle the remaining gingersnaps over the top. Bake until lightly golden and set approximately 55 minutes to 1 hour. Allow to cool for 20-30 minutes before serving.
6. While the bread pudding is baking, make the sauce. Melt the butter in a double boiler (that works best). Add the brown sugar and bourbon, whisk until the sugar has dissolved. Slowly add the egg yolks while whisking. Cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce has thickened, about 5 minutes.

Gingersnap-Bread-Pudding-with-Bourbon-Butter-Sauce-1024x1024.jpg
Pic from Strawberry Plum website
 
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