Should Juneteenth be on December Sixth Instead?

Does it really matter that Juneteenth is or is not mentioned in various books? Juneteenth doesn't have anything to do with history books but a whole lot to do with modern politics.
Leftyhunter

Actually slavery lasted decades after the ACW it was renamed convict leasing the documentary " The Thirteenth" goes into great detail about that.
All holidays are based on politcal considerations and if the African American' s who lobbied say the holiday should be June 19th then its June 19th.

Yes but Juneteenth has nothing to do with the Thirteenth Amendment and a whole lot more to do with modern politics. Juneteenth started off as a local holiday but now it's national.

Leftyhunter
I answered this exact post this morning in posts #41 and #43.
 

tcox009

Cadet
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Robert Smalls also went on to a political career after the war serving in the South Carolina House and Senate and the US House
 

1950lemans

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 23, 2013
Location
Connecticut
I'd never heard of Juneteenth until a few years ago. I suspect that was true of a lot of people.
Lots of folks who are very knowledgeable of the CW did not know of this day. When I started to study the CW intensely, my interests shifted to the war's end and its aftermath (Reconstruction). Now, years later, I'm more interested in the post-war history rather than the war itself.
On a personal note I think post 1865 is more relevant in shaping out history.
 

1950lemans

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 23, 2013
Location
Connecticut
The most famous runaway slave of the Civil War was Robert Smalls. As noted on Biography.com,

At the outbreak of the Civil War, in March 1861, Robert Smalls - an enslaved waterman - was hired as a deckhand on the Confederate supply ship the Planter, a converted cotton steamer that carried supplies between forts in Charleston Harbor. Over the course of several months, Smalls learned all he could about navigating the ship and waited for an opportunity to escape.​
In the predawn hours of May 13, 1862, while the white officers and crew slept in Charleston, Smalls and a crew of eight men, along with five women, and three children (including Smalls's wife and two children), quietly slipped the Planter out of Charleston Harbor. Over the next few hours, Smalls successfully navigated the ship through five checkpoints, offering the correct signal to pass each, and then headed out to open waters and the Union blockade. It was daring and dangerous, and if caught, the crew was prepared to blow up the vessel.​
The startled crew of the USS Onward, the first ship in the blockade to spot the Planter, almost fired on it before Smalls had the Confederate flag struck and raised a white bed sheet, signaling surrender. The ship’s treasure of guns, ammunition, and important documents proved to be a wealth of information, telling the Union commanders of shipping routes, mine locations and the times that Confederate ships docked and departed.​
The story of the courageous escape of Smalls became a national phenomenon and was one of the factors encouraging President Abraham Lincoln to authorize free African Americans to serve in the Union military. Congress bestowed a $1,500 cash prize on Smalls, and he went on a speaking tour, recounting his heroics and recruiting African Americans to serve in the Union Army. During the rest of the war, Smalls balanced his role as a spokesperson and Union Navy captain on the Planter and the ironclad USS Keokuk, conducting 17 missions in and around Charleston.​

Why is this topical? Note that Smalls and his crew escaped in May of 1862, before even the preliminary EP was issued. But several federal laws and other federal edicts, which are detailed in post #76, established him as free. Of course, Smalls had to execute his daring escape plan to enjoy the benefits of freedom that were offered by the USA. Meanwhile, Smalls' work for the US Navy helped the USA achieve military victory, and that victory was a requirement for eventually ending slavery in the former Confederate states. He and so many others should be recognized for that.

Juneteenth should include such stories as the Robert Smalls story. My hope is that Juneteenth will be used to tell the story of all the ways that slavery was contested and eventually eliminated in the 1860s.

- Alan
I think it's been mentioned before but I believe a movie should be made of Smalls.
 

Belfoured

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
I agree, that's what I said, we haven't recently created Columbus day, and why Columbus day isn't in the news, it isn't current news.

Would agree Columbus day is a poor analogy to Juneteenth, but you are the one who made it.....as it has nothing to do with the creation of holidays today, nor really should it.
It has to do with getting all worked up about December 6 vs. Juneteenth. You're the one who made that into a significant issue. My point is that it is far less important than continuing to keep a federal holiday honoring some character for "discovering America" who never spent even five seconds in the place. It's like running around in the kitchen making sure the knives and forks are in the correct drawers while a fire is raging in the living room. And Columbus Day is definitely "in the news" - you apparently haven't noticed the many places that in the past few years have had to create another state holiday or local days because we're still saddled with the Federal joke.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
It has to do with getting all worked up about December 6 vs. Juneteenth. You're the one who made that into a significant issue. My point is that it is far less important than continuing to keep a federal holiday honoring some character for "discovering America" who never spent even five seconds in the place. It's like running around in the kitchen making sure the knives and forks are in the correct drawers while a fire is raging in the living room. And Columbus Day is definitely "in the news" - you apparently haven't noticed the many places that in the past few years have had to create another state holiday or local days because we're still saddled with the Federal joke.
No I'm actually not worked up about it at all, someone created a thread asking which date would be more appropriate.

If the point of Juneteenth is supposedly when all slavery ended in the US, the Dec 6th date would be more accurate, as the June date was rather exclusive to just Texas, and even there Texas websites acknowledge it continued past June 19th there. Honestly it wasn't much a holiday as far as celebrations anywhere around here, but neither is Columbus Day either. Both seem rather non celebratory holidays. Sadly Veterans Day is increasingly joining that list.
 
Last edited:
Top