Post Civil War executions etc.

Mosby

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Jan 20, 2017
As far as I know the only executions were of Major Wirz the commander of Andersonville and Champ Ferguson the guerilla leader. Quantrill of Quantrill's Raiders evading capture and would have been executed for the Lawrence Kansas massacre. All of those were from middle class backgrounds and not West Point graduates. Were there any other executions?

Many military and political leaders crossed the border into Mexico or fled to the Bahamas or Cuba and then usually made their way to Britain, Europe, or Canada. Most of the Confederate secret service in Canada stayed there. Confederate cabinet member Judah Benjamin never returned, probably mainly because he was in charge of Confederate secret operations and might be accused of involvement in the Lincoln assassination, as well as sabotage and so on. He probably also did not want to be interogated about secret operations. The captain of the raider CSS Shenandoah stayed in Europe for 5 years afraid of being tried for piracy. Most did return once they realized there would not be many executions.
 

Lubliner

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This doesn't answer the question but does add a common theme of what happened at the end. I speak of 'Extra Billy' as he was called by Secretary Stanton, and I hear he had a high price of reward for his capture when Richmond fell. Does anyone know the outcome there, please?
Lubliner.
 

Mosby

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Jan 20, 2017
Yeh, but most of the executions were of soldiers for desertion or murder. There were executions during the war of soldiers and civilians by both sides for spying and sabotage.

My question was about post Civil War executions of Confederates. I only know of the two I mentioned.
 

Ole Miss

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I am unaware of any additional executions after the two you cited but as it was not until
August 20, 1866, after acknowledgement of Texas’ new state government, that President Johnson was able to finally proclaim that “said insurrection is at an end and that peace, order, tranquility, and civil authority now exist in and throughout the whole United States of America.”
This official proclamation may have ended the Civil War but the hatred and thirst for revenge did not. There may well have been more legal killings yet undiscovered.
Regards
David
 

BarryR

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Jun 29, 2012
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Tampa Bay
Yeh, but most of the executions were of soldiers for desertion or murder. There were executions during the war of soldiers and civilians by both sides for spying and sabotage.

My question was about post Civil War executions of Confederates. I only know of the two I mentioned.

A google searched revealed eight million hits, but this was the most prominent one...

"Although his execution is the most famous of the Civil War, Wirz was certainly not the only Confederate to be executed. Perhaps most prominent of these other Confederates to be executed was Champ Ferguson, who was convicted in the fall of 1865 for the execution of at least 53 captured Union soldiers, although Ferguson claimed the total was higher. In another high-profile case, Confederate officer Robert Kennedy was executed by a military tribunal for planting explosives around New York City, including heavily trafficked locations like P.T. Barnum's Museum"

https://www.nps.gov/ande/learn/historyculture/wirztribunal.htm
 

TnFed

First Sergeant
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Jun 18, 2018
I believe Kennedy escaped to Canada after trying to torch New York. However he came back for another mission and was caught. Sometimes
 

wausaubob

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Apr 4, 2017
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Denver, CO
People like Earl Van Dorn and John Morgan were hunted down while the war was still ongoing. People like the low level Booth conspirators were executed after minimal due process.
Terrorist act in places like Vermont, in the New York City hotels, on the docks at City Point, VA, did not put people in the mood for lengthy and inconclusive trials.
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
The Federals were more interested in restoring the Southern rigid caste system with the old Planter Class allowed to return again to their properties than any sense of justice for felony criminal acts committed by former Confederates and their friends. Some Confederates did not understand the Yankee economics here and they fled in fear of prosecution that they knew they deserved. They were spooked!
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Here executions continued, officially and unofficially it seems. Jim Jackson for example, surrendered and was paroled on the condition he leave the state, as per the terms he set off and was headed to Illinois. Six days later he "captured" with another paroled ex guerrilla, though neither had offered resistance, and then murdered by militia.
 

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