Discussion Parole

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MikeyB

Corporal
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
293
What were the consequences for getting caught violating parole? Did the conventions at the time allow for any additional punitive treatment if they caught you?

Are there any reliable parole stats out there? Would be interested in knowing how often Southerners violated parole. Was it really that big of a problem? (I assume Northerners were less incentivized to violate their paroles and this was less of a problem, but as to not impugn the honor of the Southern soldier, I don't know this to be true.)

Early in the war, when prisoner exchanges happened, would this include a release of parolees or did this term only apply to actual physical emptying of prisons? I would imagine from a humanitarian perspective, emptying the prisons would take precedence over parolees being able to serve again, but clearly this didn't happen. What was the official policy?

mike
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,662
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
What were the consequences for getting caught violating parole? Did the conventions at the time allow for any additional punitive treatment if they caught you?

Are there any reliable parole stats out there? Would be interested in knowing how often Southerners violated parole. Was it really that big of a problem? (I assume Northerners were less incentivized to violate their paroles and this was less of a problem, but as to not impugn the honor of the Southern soldier, I don't know this to be true.)

Early in the war, when prisoner exchanges happened, would this include a release of parolees or did this term only apply to actual physical emptying of prisons? I would imagine from a humanitarian perspective, emptying the prisons would take precedence over parolees being able to serve again, but clearly this didn't happen. What was the official policy?

mike
Prisoners "exchanged" were already imprisoned. Men "paroled", were captured and paroled in the field. An example of this would be East Tennessee Confederates "paroled" at Vicksburg. They returned to their homes, later reported to "parole camps", to await being "properly exchanged" and rejoining the Army. While the system was still working, it was handled by the two Governments. I don't know of any "incentive" either side's soldiers would have to "break parole", though it probably did happen. I would think both sides would appreciate the opportunity to go home and get away from the war, if only temporarily.
 
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