Organize the AoT 1864

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Jul 2, 2017
Messages
317
Location
Georgia
#1
Most people would say that John Bell Hood's performance in command of a corps in the Army of Tennessee in the Atlanta Campaign left much to be desired. I can't find that much to complain about as far as A. P. Stewart's performance in command of Polk's corps is concerned, but exanining some alternatives could be worthwhile. Similar to the thread asking who should have the III Corps of the ANV, this thread asks how you would have organized the Army of Tennesee as it was at Dalton, Georgia, assuming John Bell Hood isn't present.

This was the list of major generals in January 1864 in the AoT by seniority:
William W. Loring (15 Feb. 1862)
Benjamin F. Cheatham (10 Mar. 1862)
Thomas C. Hindman (14 April 1862)
Samuel G. French (31 Aug. 1862)
Carter L. Stevenson (10 Oct. 1862)
John Bell Hood (10 Oct. 1862)
Patrick R. Cleburne (13 Dec. 1862)
William H. T. Walker (23 May 1863)
Alexander P. Stewart (2 June 1863)

As you can see, Hood was promoted over five generals senior to him. When Polk's corps became available, Johnston promoted Stewart over six (Hindman having been wounded), showing just how highly Johnston thought of "Old A. P." Interestingly, President Davis asked Robert E. Lee if he thought William N. Pendleton, Lee's artillery chief, would be a good choice for Polk's old position. Lee didn't think so, which I can't say I find surprising. Pendleton seems an odd suggestion, as I don't believe he commanded infantry during the war.
 
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5,382
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#2
West Point training was what Davis required much of the time on promotions, why Cleburne didn't get any farther than he did.

Kevin Dally
 

BlueandGrayl

First Sergeant
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May 27, 2018
Messages
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Location
Corona, California
#3
Most people would say that John Bell Hood's performance in command of a corps in the Army of Tennessee in the Atlanta Campaign left much to be desired. I can't find that much to complain about as far as A. P. Stewart's performance in command of Polk's corps is concerned, but exanining some alternatives could be worthwhile. Similar to the thread asking who should have the III Corps of the ANV, this thread asks how you would have organized the Army of Tennesee as it was at Dalton, Georgia, assuming John Bell Hood isn't present.

This was the list of major generals in January 1864 in the AoT by seniority:
William W. Loring (15 Feb. 1862)
Benjamin F. Cheatham (10 Mar. 1862)
Thomas C. Hindman (14 April 1862)
Samuel G. French (31 Aug. 1862)
Carter L. Stevenson (10 Oct. 1862)
John Bell Hood (10 Oct. 1862)
Patrick R. Cleburne (13 Dec. 1862)
William H. T. Walker (23 May 1863)
Alexander P. Stewart (2 June 1863)

As you can see, Hood was promoted over five generals senior to him. When Polk's corps became available, Johnston promoted Stewart over six (Hindman having been wounded), showing just how highly Johnston thought of "Old A. P." Interestingly, President Davis asked Robert E. Lee if he thought William N. Pendleton, Lee's artillery chief, would be a good choice for Polk's old position. Lee didn't think so, which I can't say I find surprising. Pendleton seems an odd suggestion, as I don't believe he commanded infantry during the war.
Perhaps either Patrick Cleburne or Thomas C. Hindman could be head of the Army of Tennessee.
 
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
9,228
Location
Carlisle, PA
#5
Most people would say that John Bell Hood's performance in command of a corps in the Army of Tennessee in the Atlanta Campaign left much to be desired. I can't find that much to complain about as far as A. P. Stewart's performance in command of Polk's corps is concerned, but exanining some alternatives could be worthwhile. Similar to the thread asking who should have the III Corps of the ANV, this thread asks how you would have organized the Army of Tennesee as it was at Dalton, Georgia, assuming John Bell Hood isn't present.

This was the list of major generals in January 1864 in the AoT by seniority:
William W. Loring (15 Feb. 1862)
Benjamin F. Cheatham (10 Mar. 1862)
Thomas C. Hindman (14 April 1862)
Samuel G. French (31 Aug. 1862)
Carter L. Stevenson (10 Oct. 1862)
John Bell Hood (10 Oct. 1862)
Patrick R. Cleburne (13 Dec. 1862)
William H. T. Walker (23 May 1863)
Alexander P. Stewart (2 June 1863)

As you can see, Hood was promoted over five generals senior to him. When Polk's corps became available, Johnston promoted Stewart over six (Hindman having been wounded), showing just how highly Johnston thought of "Old A. P." Interestingly, President Davis asked Robert E. Lee if he thought William N. Pendleton, Lee's artillery chief, would be a good choice for Polk's old position. Lee didn't think so, which I can't say I find surprising. Pendleton seems an odd suggestion, as I don't believe he commanded infantry during the war.
That's a pretty poor lot. Particularly at the senior end.

Ryan
 

Jamieva

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
3,886
Location
Midlothian, VA
#6
Most people would say that John Bell Hood's performance in command of a corps in the Army of Tennessee in the Atlanta Campaign left much to be desired. I can't find that much to complain about as far as A. P. Stewart's performance in command of Polk's corps is concerned, but exanining some alternatives could be worthwhile. Similar to the thread asking who should have the III Corps of the ANV, this thread asks how you would have organized the Army of Tennesee as it was at Dalton, Georgia, assuming John Bell Hood isn't present.

This was the list of major generals in January 1864 in the AoT by seniority:
William W. Loring (15 Feb. 1862)
Benjamin F. Cheatham (10 Mar. 1862)
Thomas C. Hindman (14 April 1862)
Samuel G. French (31 Aug. 1862)
Carter L. Stevenson (10 Oct. 1862)
John Bell Hood (10 Oct. 1862)
Patrick R. Cleburne (13 Dec. 1862)
William H. T. Walker (23 May 1863)
Alexander P. Stewart (2 June 1863)

As you can see, Hood was promoted over five generals senior to him. When Polk's corps became available, Johnston promoted Stewart over six (Hindman having been wounded), showing just how highly Johnston thought of "Old A. P." Interestingly, President Davis asked Robert E. Lee if he thought William N. Pendleton, Lee's artillery chief, would be a good choice for Polk's old position. Lee didn't think so, which I can't say I find surprising. Pendleton seems an odd suggestion, as I don't believe he commanded infantry during the war.
There are multiple occurences during the war that being wounded got you a promotion from colonel to Brigadier General, Brigadier to Major general etc. Pickett, Ewell, etc there are others.
 


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