Olmsted, Fredrick Law

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#1
When the nation descended into civil war in April 1861, Frederick Law Olmsted, like many thousands of Northerners, was eager to serve his country. However, a carriage accident in 1860 had rendered Olmsted unable to serve in a combat role. Fortunately for the Union cause, he possessed other weapons: a keen intellect, superb administrative skills, and fierce determination, all of which he applied in his role as General Secretary of the United States Sanitary Commission.

https://www.nps.gov/frla/learn/historyculture/olmsted-and-the-civil-war.htm
 

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#3
Yes, Olmsted is best known as a landscape architect. He designed New York City's Central Park in addition to his work in Chicago and other places.

A rich kid from Connecticut, doors were opened for him early in his life, which he took advantage of, to his credit.

Olmsted spent a cumulative total of about five years, traveling through the Antebellum South, from Norfolk, Virginia to Austin, Texas.

I've read three books describing his travels. A Journey through the Seaboard Slave States, A Journey in the Back Country and A Journey Through Texas.

Each is out of copyright protection and may be read online, free. Google is your friend.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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#6
Rich yes and did a lot of traveling but he also attempted farming a couple of times, with some initial success.

He landscaped the US Capital, and preserve what is now Yosemite National Park

Died a mad man.
Can you give details on how he died? I wonder why he went insane.
 
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Hill towns of Western Mass
#7
The short answer from Wiki: In 1895, senility forced Olmsted to retire. By 1898 he moved to Belmont, Massachusetts, and took up residence as a patient at the McLean Hospital, for whose grounds he had submitted a design which was never executed. He remained there until his death in 1903.

His son's remakes about his passing are touching and more then I care to type. Besides it's the end of the book and I can't tell you the ending.
 

kevikens

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#8
Yes, Olmsted is best known as a landscape architect. He designed New York City's Central Park in addition to his work in Chicago and other places.

A rich kid from Connecticut, doors were opened for him early in his life, which he took advantage of, to his credit.

Olmsted spent a cumulative total of about five years, traveling through the Antebellum South, from Norfolk, Virginia to Austin, Texas.

I've read three books describing his travels. A Journey through the Seaboard Slave States, A Journey in the Back Country and A Journey Through Texas.

Each is out of copyright protection and may be read online, free. Google is your friend.
When I would teach the Ante Bellum Period to my high school students I would incorporate his observations of what the Peculiar Institution was like. As a reporter and a trained observer his accounts were very matter of fact and unlike the description of slavery's opponents and defenders. I am not sure I could get away with presenting these descriptions to high school students today.
 

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