Memorable Flags, Remembering Fallen Under Them, Memorial Day

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JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
flag 4 the-51st-pennsylvania-flag.jpg

* Flag of the 51st Pennsylvania Regiment

Commanded by Col. John Hartranft, the 51st Pennsylvania and the 51st New York were ordered to take the Rohrbach Bridge (later known as Burnside’s Bridge) after two earlier Federal attacks had failed. Charging down the wooded hillside, the 51st Pennsylvania was immediately taken under fire by the Georgians dug in on the far bank. Breaking through and over a fenceline skirting the road near the bridge, the 51st , carrying this flag, charged over the span as bullets struck home. Col. Hartranft led his men across the bridge and to the far bank where they were able to scatter the remaining Confederate defenders. Once resupplied, the 51st Pennsylvania took part in the final Union attacks near the town of Sharpsburg. The 51st Pennsylvania lost 21 killed and 99 wounded during the Battle of Antietam


' Putting the flags out ', our ritual, probably marks us as the kooky family in this neck of the woods. Little ones line the street at intervals, the big 48 star gets tacked on our house. Did it when we were little, if the kids do not swear I'll haunt them. Doesn't make us anything more than yes, kinda kooky on our flag.

The Stars and Stripes, no matter what occurred during this war we study so profoundly, symbolizes Memorial Day for a reason. Memorial Day is the day we remember all who died fighting for this flag. America in cotton or rayon or silk, a little gaudy, much maligned, instantly identifiable- always visible. Kind of like our country.

Some flags were the last thing seen by a soldier this side of Heaven- the point of Memorial Day, really.

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61st New York Volunteer Regiment

Carrying this wool national color into action, the 61st New York advanced as part of Israel Richardson’s attack on the Confederate right in the Sunken Road. Combined with the 64th New York, this unit was commanded by Col. Francis Barlow and then later by Lt. Col. Nelson Miles – both who would become senior commanders in the Union army by war’s end. Part of Caldwell’s brigade, the men of the 61st New York helped to dislodge the last remaining Confederates from the southern end of the Sunken Road and then proceeded to move on the Piper Farm. At Antietam, the 61st lost 6 killed, 34 wounded, and 1 missing in action. Colonel Miles later deposited this flag with New York state authorities in early 1863. Reportedly the flag is stained with the blood of Sgt. Frank Aldrich.

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84th USCT Volunteer Regiment

Because I cannot find the records for the 84th, despite a war filled with active service ( as we can see from this flag ) inserting service stats of the 83rd USCT.

Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 32 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 211 Enlisted men by disease. Total 245.


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Women at home memorialized their country, the war and fallen with handwork symbolizing the flag.

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149th Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment


The 149th Pennsylvania was in heavy fighting on the first day of the battle of Gettysburg. Captain Nicoll’s
infantry unit, the 124th New York, was also known as the "Orange Blossoms." Captain Nicoll was killed during intense fighting on the second day of the battle, when the Orange Blossoms defended against a Confederate assault on the Union left flank near Devil’s Den, 53 killed.

Please add? Point of thread.






 
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AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
My favorite: the 1st Texas Infantry's state colors, or "The Wigfall Flag."

1st-texas-flag-jpg.jpg

After the 1st Texas arrived in Richmond in summer of 1861 there was a large ceremony held on the Richmond fair grounds for the presentation of the flag. Among those present was President Davis, who personally presented the flag to the regiment in the name of Louis T. Wigfall's daughter, Lula. The flag was also supposedly made in part from Louis T. Wigfall's wife, Fannie Wigfall's wedding dress. After the flag was handed to then Colonel Wigfall, he reportedly replied to President Davis, "the boys will maintain [the flag] or die."

The Wigfall flag was carried by the regiment in Peninsula Campaign, Seven Days battles, Second Manassas and Antietam. And I'm sure most here already know the sad ending. In Miller's Cornfield at Antietam the 1st Texas lost 82.3% of its strength, the entire color guard was shot down and both the Wigfall flag and the regiment's ANV battle flag were captured. After the battle 13 dead Texans were found laying around the colors; Pvt. Samuel Johnson of the 9th Penn. Reserves was awarded the MOH for "capturing" the flags from the battlefield. The 1st Texas Infantry lost 45 killed and 141 wounded, for a total of 186 out of 226 engaged.

Lone Star by Don Troiani, depicting the Old First's charge into Miller's Cornfield and the last time the Wigfall flag flew over regiment.
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Waterloo50

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Jul 7, 2015
Location
Blighty.
The United States of America is known the world over for its patriotism, its something that makes your country stand out. I salute your brave service men and women, both those that made it through and those who didn't.:thumbsup:
 
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