Map of Buell

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#1
I live in Hardin County Tennessee. I cant seem to find a detailed map of Buell and how he made it to Savannah from Nashville. If anyone could send me a link I would greatly appreciate it. The only maps I can find are the ones he drew out at the battle of Shiloh. I was wanting to see the maps that are east of the river. Thanks!
 

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Ole Miss

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Welcome from the Shiloh/Pittsburg Landing Forum and North Mississippi! Being from Hardin County certainly enables you to drop in on Shiloh very easily. Look forward to your participation on the board and the Shiloh Forum!

Looking for any information regarding Buell's line of march from Nashville to Savannah I went to his Official Report from Shiloh. Little information given by listed below but will keep searching for more, hope this is of interest.
Regards
David

Report of Maj. Gen. Bon Carlos Buell, TJ. 8. Army, commanding Army of the Ohio, with congratulatory orders.
Headquarters Army of the Ohio,
Field of Shiloh, April 15, 1862.
Sir: The rear division of the army under my command, which had been delayed a considerable time in rebuilding the Duck River Bridge, left Columbia on the 3d instant. I left the evening of that day, and arrived at Savannah on the evening of the 5th. General Nelson, with his division, which formed the advance, arrived the same day. The other divisions marched with intervals of about 6 miles.

On the morning of the 6th the firing of cannon and musketry was heard in the direction of this place. Apprehending that a serious engagement had commenced, 1 went to General Grant’s headquarters to get information as to the best means of reaching the battle-field with the division that had arrived. At the same time orders were dispatched to the divisions in rear to leave their trains and push forward by forced marches. I learned that General Grant had just started, leaving orders for General Kelson to march to the river opposite Pittsburg Landing to be ferried across. On examination of the road up the river I discovered it to be impracticable for artillery, and General Kelson was directed to leave his to be carried forward by steamer.

The impression existed at Savannah that the firing was only an affair of outposts, the same thing having occurred for the two or three previous days; but as it continued I determined to go at once to the scene of action, and accordingly started with my chief of staff, Colonel Fry, on a steamer, which I had ordered to get under steam. As we proceeded up the river groups of soldiers were seen upon the west bank, and it soon became evident that they were stragglers from the army that was engaged. The groups increased in size and frequency, until, as we apj)roached the Landing, they amounted to whole companies, and almost regiments, and at the Landing the banks swarmed with a confused mass of men of various regiments. The number could not have been less than 4,000 or 5,000, and later in the day it became much greater.
 

Ole Miss

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I found a copy Colonel Jacob Ammen Jr's diary in the Official Records of the Rebellion which gives a better detailed description of the route taken by the Army of Ohio from Nashville to Savannah. It begins on page 329. I have copied the diary up to April 6, 1862 which I will post latter.

I hope this will be of assistance in reaching your research goal.
Regards
David

Col. Jacob Ammen Jr’s diary of march to and battle at Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.

March 17.—The Fourth Division (Tenth, Nineteenth, and Twenty-second Brigades) struck tents [at Nashville, Tenn.], and took up the line of march for Franklin, Tenn., at 8 p. in. Encamped 12 miles from Nashville.

March 20.—On the march at 7 a. m. Proceed about 3 miles and encamp. Bridge over Duck River at Columbia burned by the rebels river high;no boats. General McCook’s division in advance, repairing bridge.

March 27.—General Buell pitches his tents on the opposite side of the road from the Tenth Brigade. Late in the evening General Nelson, in returning from General Buell’s headquarters, informed me that he had General Buell’s permission to take the advance, and gave me a verbal order to cross Duck River at daylight the 29th. I inquired if the bridge would be done. He answered, No.” “Are there boats? He said, “No; but the river is falling; and, d-n you, get over, for we must have the advance and get the glory.” He enjoined secrecy, lest we should be prevented taking the advance.

March 28.—Went to Duck River to examine the fords; sent some of my cavalry in; river 200 yards or more wide; fords crooked. Fortunately, some army wagons return with forage and ford the river; the water just touches the beds of the wagons; current strong; water above and below, deep; no boats. Troops busy rebuilding bridge. General McCook’s division encamped here. Sent orders to commanders of regiments to have reveille at 3 a. m. to-morrow and prepare to march.


March 29.—Reveille at 3 a. m., breakfast, wagons loaded, column formed; march commenced before it is light; reach the ford. The men are ordered to make bundle of pantaloons, drawers, &c., attach it to bayonets, and wade the stream. Cavalry were stationed in the river to point out the ford, break the force of the current, and protect the infantry, if necessary. The Tenth Brigade—infantry and artillery and train—crossed Duck River this cold and disagreeable day without accident; went 2 miles southwest of Columbia, Tenn., and encamped. The Nineteenth and Twenty-second Brigades came from their camp ground, 10 miles back, but did not all get across the river. Most of those troops and their wagons forded Duck River Sunday, 30th; bridge not completed. The division commanded by General T. L. Crittenden followed the Fourth.

March 30.—March about 4 miles; pass General Pillow’s plantation and encamp on Captain Polk’s plantation. The Tenth [Brigade] moves forward to give room to the troops crossing river.

March 31.—General Nelson directs me to conduct the march so as to reach Savannah, Tenn., Monday, April 7, as we are not wanted there before that time. Marched 10 miles, passed Mount Pleasant, encamp by a large stream; hear of some provisions about 3 miles off, belonging to the Confederates; send a detachment, and get six wagon loads of salt pork, &c.

April 1.—Marched 14 miles; encamped 3 miles after crossing Buffalo Biver.

April 2.—Marched 16 miles and encamped at Proctor’s furnace, 5 miles from Waynesborough.

April 3.—Passed through Waynesborough; small Union flags on some houses; women ask to let the band play some old tunes—Yankee Doodle, &c. The music makes them weep for joy. March 15 miles and encamp. Very poor country, bad roads; land poor 5 miles after passing Mount Pleasant to this place.

April 4.—Marched 10 1/2 miles; rough, poor country, but little improvement; bad roads.

April 5.—Marched 9 1/2 miles over bad roads, and reached Savannah, Tenn., before 12 m. General Grant was not at his headquarters (Savannah), and no one to give orders. General Nelson ordered me to go into camp. The Tenth Brigade encamped on the southwest side of the town, about half to three-fourths of a mile from the brick house on the river (headquarters). About 3 p. m. General Grant and General Nelson came to my tent. General Grant declined to dismount, as he had an engagement. In answer to my remark that our troops were not fatigued and could march on to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., if necessary, General Grant said, “You cannot march through the swamps; make the troops comfortable ; I will send boats for you Monday or Tuesday, or some time early in the week. There will be no fight at Pittsburg Landing; we will have to go to Corinth, where the rebels are fortified. If they come to attack us, we can whip them, as I have more than twice as many troops as I had at Fort Donelson. Be sure and call at the brick house on the river to-morrow evening, as I have ah engagement for this evening.” He and General Kelson then rode off. General Buell arrived about sundown. I called on him at his headquarters, about a quarter of a mile from my tent. The Nineteenth and Twenty-second Brigades encamped near the road before reaching the town. I was not at these camps. As the division is to remain here some days, I issue orders to the Tenth Brigade for review and inspection, to take place Sunday, April 6, 9 a. m.
 

Ole Miss

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Since Ammen entry for April 6th is so long I am posting it in 2 parts.
Regards
David

Part 1
April 6.—A beautiful, bright, pleasant morning. The men of the Tenth Brigade are putting their guns in order and brushing their uniforms for the parade. The officers are busy with their commands to have all in readiness, and Jesse Crane is polishing my spurs and preparing my horse and his rider to appear to the best advantage at the review and inspection ordered. The sound of distant cannon in the direction of Pittsburg Landing is heard; not an uncommon occurrence when near a large army. The reports are more numerous and the intervals less, and soon there is almost a continuous roar of artillery; distant, it is true, but as it continues and increases without any cessation, all conclude that a battle has commenced and is raging. The officers and men of the Tenth Brigade are more diligent in preparing themselves to march, to have arms and ammunition ready for the conflict. The preparation for parade and review is abandoned and all attention given to what is required in battle. General Nelson comes dashing to our camp at the head of his staff, and gives me orders to be ready to proceed to the assistance of the Army of the Tennessee at Pittsburg Landing either by the boats or through the swamp, if the officers and cavalry sent by General Buell and himself found a practicable route through the swamp. He went to the landing on the river to watch for the boats and said he would send me ^rders. The Tenth Brigade was soon under arms and inspected, cartridge boxes filled, every gun examined. The Thirty-sixth Indiana, Sixth Ohio, and Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; also Cox’s Indiana battery, six pieces, horses harnessed, regimental teams ready to move, all prepared. If the teams and battery had to be left, a guard was detailed to remain with them. Having my arms and ammunition in order and the men ready to march and no orders from General Nelson, I rode to the brick house (headquarters), on the river, and there met Generals Buell and Nelson, both very impatient, as there was no appearance of boats coming down the river from the battle-field. Part of those sent to the swamp had returned and reported unfavorably. The others were anxiously looked for, and it was hoped would find a route practicable for infantry at least. The roar of artillery continued and rumors of our defeat were numerous. The boats appeared to be the only means of our reaching our companions in arms. I ascertained that my friend General C. F. Smith was upstairs, a cripple, and obtained permission to see him. He was in fine spirits; laughed at me for thinking that a great battle was raging; said it was only a skirmish of pickets, and that I was accustomed to small affairs. He said it was a large and hot picket skirmish. As there was no cessation, no diminution, and the sounds appeared to be coming nearer and growing more distinct, he said a part of the army might be engaged.
At this point an orderly came to the door and said General Nelson wanted to see me. I bade General Smith adieu, and was at once with Generals Buell and Nelson. A small steamer was approaching the landing from below and was soon to proceed up the river. The remainder of the officers and men had returned from the swamp without success, but a large, fine-looking Tennesseean, who professes to be a strong Union man and a desperate hater of rebels, is with the two generals. He says he knows every pass through the swamp; that he .can conduct the infantry to the battle-field, but that wagons and [artillery cannot get through the deep mud. It is about noon. General Buell orders General Nelson to march through the swamp if the boats do not soon appear in sight. General Buell and staff take passage on the steamer and start up the river for Pittsburg Landing. General Nelson orders me to my camp, to have my command formed ready to march either by boat or by land. About 1 p. m. an officer came with the guide and orders from General Nelson to march through the swamp, as no boats were in sight. The column being ready the forward is sounded; the march is commenced along a ridge. The teams, artillery, and guard are left in camp. General Nelson goes to start the other brigades of his division. The Tenth Brigade marches at a good rate, on a dry road at the beginning, to the music of the cannons’ roar. On we go; the battle is evidently nearer, and we imagine the sound of small-arms can at times be heard. Three miles of good road on the ridge and our fine-looking guide leads down into the black-mud swamp, and consoles us by saying there are only about 5 miles more of it to the Landing. On the men march through the mud; cross a log bridge across a ditch full of water (bridge fastened down), to get into mud again. Our guide leads through a forest; no improvements. If there is a road, the subsiding wraters leave but indistinct traces. The roar of cannon continues; the volleys of musketry can be distinguished. The men appear cool, yet marched a good rate through the mud; appear anxious to meet the foe. The Thirty-sixth Indiana Yolunteer Infantry, Col. W. Grose, is in front. This regiment has not been under fire; has not seen much service. The Sixth Ohio, Lieut. Col. N. L. Anderson, is next; has seen more service than the Thirty-sixth, but has not been under fire as a regiment, although has had skirmishes, & The Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. F. C. Jones, brings up the rear. This regiment has been under severe fire several times; behaved well, but does not appear as anxious as the other regiments to get into a fight. In spite of the mud and water we are making our way through the dense forest. General Nelson comes dashing along, followed by his staff* and escort. Says to me, “I will take your guide; hurry on; you can follow our trail.” A hundred horsemen moving rapidly by twos* over such ground left a trail that we had no difficulty in following. Heavy as the marching is the men do their best to hurry on; no stop at the end of the hour; no lagging behind; all the men are eager to comply with the wish of their brave, impetuous general; rough at times, but always takes good care of the men under his command, and they have full confidence in his skill to direct their movements in battle, and to extricate them, if necessary, in good order, &c. The sound of the guns is more distinct; imagination hears the shout of the combatants; the field of strife is much nearer. Some distance in front of the head of the column a courier at full speed meets, halts, and says, u Colonel Ammen, the general sends his compliments, to hurry up or all will be lost; the enemy is driving our men.” 4<How far to the river?” “A mile and a half or two miles.” “Beturn, and tell the general we are coming as fast as possible.” I ordered my wanted to see me. I bade General Smith adieu, and was at once with Generals Buell and Nelson. A small steamer was approaching the landing from below and was soon to proceed up the river. The remainder of the officers and men had returned from the swamp without success, but a large, fine-looking Tennesseean, who professes to be a strong Union man and a desperate hater of rebels, is with the two generals. He says he knows every pass through the swamp; that he .can conduct the infantry to the battle-field, but that wagons and [artillery cannot get through the deep mud. It is about noon. General Buell orders General Nelson to march through the swamp if the boats do not soon appear in sight. General Buell and staff take passage on the steamer and start up the river for Pittsburg Landing. General Nelson orders me to my camp, to have my command formed ready to march either by boat or by land. About 1 p. m. an officer came with the guide and orders from General Nelson to march through the swamp, as no boats were in sight. The column being ready the forward is sounded; the march is commenced along a ridge. The teams, artillery, and guard are left in camp. General Nelson goes to start the other brigades of his division. The Tenth Brigade marches at a good rate, on a dry road at the beginning, to the music of the cannons’ roar. On we go; the battle is evidently nearer, and we imagine the sound of small-arms can at times be heard. Three miles of good road on the ridge and our fine-looking guide leads down into the black-mud swamp, and consoles us by saying there are only about 5 miles more of it to the Landing. On the men march through the mud; cross a log bridge across a ditch full of water (bridge fastened down), to get into mud again. Our guide leads through a forest; no improvements. If there is a road, the subsiding waters leave but indistinct traces. The roar of cannon continues; the volleys of musketry can be distinguished. The men appear cool, yet marched a good rate through the mud; appear anxious to meet the foe. The Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Col. W. Grose, is in front. This regiment has not been under fire; has not seen much service. The Sixth Ohio, Lieut. Col. N. L. Anderson, is next; has seen more service than tjhe Thirty-sixth, but has not been under fire as a regiment, although has had skirmishes, &c. The Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. F. C. Jones, brings up the rear. This regiment has been under severe fire several times; behaved well, but does not appear as anxious as the other regiments to get into a fight. In spite of the mud and water we are making our way through the dense forest. General Nelson comes dashing along, followed by his staff* and escort. Says to me, “I will take your guide; hurry on; you can follow our trail.” A hundred horsemen moving rapidly by twos* over such ground left a trail that we had no difficulty in following. Heavy as the marching is the men do their best to hurry on; no stop at the end of the hour; no lagging behind; all the men are eager to comply with the wish of their brave, impetuous general; rough at times, but always takes good care of the men under his command, and they have full confidence in his skill to direct their movements in battle, and to extricate them, if necessary, in good order, &c. The sound of the guns is more distinct; imagination hears the shout of the combatants; the field of strife is much nearer. Some distance in front of the head of the column a courier at full speed meets, halts, and says, u Colonel Ammen, the general sends his compliments, to hurry up or all will be lost; the enemy is driving our men.” “How far to the river?” “A mile and a half or two miles.” “Return, and tell the general we are coming as fast as possible.” I ordered my staff officers to continue in front and stop couriers if any more came; not to let such news get to the troops in column. I rode to the side and let the troops file by, asking them if they could march faster without too much fatigue, as they were needed. “O, yes, colonel; we are not tired. Do you think the fight will be over before we get thereV1 My answer, “I hope so, if it goes right.” They answer, “You have seen the elephant often; we want to see him once, anyhow.” The Thirty-sixth Indiana and Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry were eager for the fight. The Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry had seen the elephant several times, and did not care about seeing him again unless necessary. All three regiments were cheerful; considerably excited, yet cool
 

Ole Miss

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Ammen's Diary Part 2
Regards
David

Part 2
Our pace was accelerated, and I was again at the head of the column, when another courier came with a message of the same import as the first, and soon another. Both were sent back, and the head of the column emerged from the dense forest into a field that bordered on the Tennessee River. Now at intervals the shouts of men could be heard, the steam-whistle, discharge of all kinds of arms—a confused noise. In we went to a point opposite the landing at Pittsburg. The pioneers were put to work to cut a road down the bank to enable men and horses l|to get on the boats. The northeast bank is low, the opposite bank is high—100 feet or more. The space between the top of the bank and the river, up and down a half a mile or more, was crowded with men; the river was full of boats with steam up, and these boats had many soldiers on them; men in uniform on the boats and under the river bank {10,000 to 15,000) demoralized. Signals urging us to hurry over, which I could not understand, as there were so many on the boats and under the bank not engaged of the reserve, as I supposed then. General Nelson went over on the first boat with a part of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, Colonel Grose. General Nelson ordered me to remain and see my brigade over and give orders to the commanders of the other brigades (Colonels Hazen and Bruce) to bring their brigades after the Tenth. I instructed Colonel Grose to be certain to keep guides at the river to conduct all our command to the same point on their arrival by boat. Part of the Tenth had been sent over; orders had been given to Colonels Hazen and Bruce, and I crossed half of the Tenth. On each side the boats were crowded with demoralized soldiers, so that only three or four companies could cross on a boat. On our passage over they said their regiments were cut to pieces, &c., and that we would meet the same fate, &c. The vagabonds under the bank told the same story, and yet my new troops pressed through the crowd without showing any signs of fear. In crossing th^ river some of my men called my attention to men with uniforms, even shoulder-straps, making their way across the stream on logs, and wished to shoot the cowards. Such looks of terror, such confusion, I never saw before, and do not wish to see again.
On top of the banks, near some buildings, I found the Thirty-sixth Indiana partly formed in line, persons running from the front passing through the line and breaking it. Here, too, were Generals Grant, Buell, and Nelson, all of them cool and calm. General Grant directed me to support a battery about 60 to 100 yards to the left of the road, which was done as soon as the line could be formed—probably in three or four minutes—Generals Buell and Nelson assisting. The Thirty-sixth Indiana and part of the Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry were placed in position behind the crest of the hill, near the battery, the left protected by a deep ravine parallel to the river and having water in it; the right about 300 yards from the landing. General Buell, that cool and clear-headed soldier, selected the position, and was with us when the rebels reached the crest of the hill, received our fire, were shaken, fell back, advanced again, &c. The assaults of the enemy were met by our troops and successfully resisted. About five minutes after we were in position the rebels made the first attack, and kept on a quarter to half hour (dusk), when they withdrew. Our loss was only 1 man killed. We were down the slope of the hill, and the enemy firing before they depressed their pieces, the balls went over our heads. Our men, in the hurry, fired in the same way. The balls followed the slope of the ground and were destructive. [?] The extreme left of the line of battle, which we occupied and where we repelled the attacks of the enemy, had not one soldier on it when we took position—open for the advance of the enemy. Lieut. B. F. Wheeler, of my staff, and some men of my escort were detailed to watch the boats and bring the troops of the Tenth Brigade to us as they arrived. The remainder of the Sixth was formed in rear of our line of battle, but the Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered about half a mile to our right, where the enemy was making a desperate attack. Their position was watched and reported to me by some men of my escort. The night was soon very dark, and slight rain at first, then heavy at times. The other brigades of the Fourth Division were over or crossing. Ammunition was brought to a large tree close to our lines, the cartridge boxes were filled and 20 additional rounds given to every man to carry on his person. This done, General Buell directed me to send scouts to the front and ascertain if the enemy was near our front, and, if possible, advance our line of battle several hundreds yards and as near the deep bayou that was reported in our front as practicable. One company of the Thirty-sixth Indiana and one company of the Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry were deployed as skirmishers on our front and ordered to advance cautiously and in order, but not to bring on an engagement—to advance to the opposite bank of the bayou and halt, sending back couriers to report from time to time. These companies moved cautiously and promptly, taking into account the darkness of the night and the difficulties of the ground, found no force between us and the bayou, and remained as our picket line until morning.
About 10 o’clock at night we commenced forming our new line of battle beyond the crest of the hill, in advance of our old line about 300 yards. Too dark to see, we prolonged our line by touch. The line was formed in a short time, although, if the ground could have been seen, it would have been a very long line—front line, Thirty-sixth Indiana and Sixth Ohio. About 10.30 o’clock at night Generals Buell and Nelson returned and asked if I was almost ready to commence forming my advance line. The answer was, “It is about formed,” which gratified them. The Nineteenth was formed on the right of the Tenth .and the Twenty-second on the right of the Nineteenth Brigade. The Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was brought back about midnight and formed my second line and reserve. The troops had orders to lie down in line with their arms and get such rest as they could in the rain, the pickets in front keeping watch. The Tenth Brigade is together again, formed in battle order; has had supper, and is supplied (every man) with 60 rounds of ammunition, to commence the battle to-morrow. The men are as comfortable as the enemy in front and the falling rain and want of shelter will permit, and certainly much more cheerful and prompt and obedient that I could expect. My staff officers, my escort, and myself are between the two lines of the Tenth Brigade. The guns fired at intervals from the gunboats break the stillness of the night, but do not prevent sleep. It is after midnight, rain falling, and I am sitting at the root of a large tree, holding my horse, ready to mount if necessary. Sleep, sweet, refreshing sleep, removes all my anxieties and troubles for two hours. During the night Crittenden’s and McCook’s divisions crossed the river.
 

ErnieMac

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I've attached War of the Rebellion Atlas Plate 24. The center portion of the plate was prepared at the direction of George Thomas to supplement a military committee investigation of Buell following the 1862 Kentucky Campaign. Buell's route to Shiloh heading south from Nashville thru Franklin to Columbia and the southwest to Savannah is clearly marked.

plate024.jpg
 

TomP

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It is not what you asked for, but I do have a copy of the map Buell turned in with his official report on the siege of Corinth, May 1862.

Tom
 



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