Restricted Lubbock, Texas Confederate Monument

Joined
Jan 28, 2021
Lubbock, Texas

Confederate Monument




The city and county of Lubbock are named for Colonel Thomas S. Lubbock, a Confederate officer and Texas Ranger.

Originally from Charleston, South Carolina, in 1835 Thomas moved to New Orleans and shortly, along with his brother, and future governor, Francis, joined in the Texas Revolution. He participated in several military actions and rose to lead a company of volunteers. Captured and confined in a prison in Mexico City, Thomas escaped and made his way back to Texas where he decided to permanently relocate.

Over the years, he became a strong secessionist and at the beginning of the Civil War, travelled from Galveston to Richmond, Virginia with Benjamin Terry, James Longstreet and others. He petitioned CSA President Jefferson Davis for “authority to raise a company.” While still a civilian, in the summer of 1861, he led a collection of Virginia cavalry and was wounded, captured and then fought in the Battle of First Manassas. Afterwards, he and fellow Texan and friend Benjamin Terry were authorized to raise a regiment of cavalry to serve in the Confederate Army. They returned home and formed the 8th​ TX better known as the famous Terry’s Texas Rangers. Lubbock died in December of 1861 in Kentucky after being promoted to colonel of his regiment.

In 1964, the state of Texas erected a Confederate monument outside the Lubbock County Courthouse. The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal stated on October 15, 2017, [1964] is “notable because many Confederate monuments were erected across the South during this era … to discourage the Civil Rights movement.”





The east side of the stone reads:



TEXAS

IN THE CIVIL WAR

1861-1865

TEXAS MADE AN ALL OUT EFFORT FOR THE CONFEDERACY AFTER A 3 TO 1 POPULAR VOTE FOR SECESSION- 90,000 TROOPS, FAMED FOR MOBILITY AND DARING, FOUGHT ON EVERY BATTLEFRONT. A 2,000 MILE FRONTIER AND COAST WERE SUCCESSUFLLY DFENDED FROM UNION TROOP INVASIONS AND SAVAGE INDIANS. TEXAS WAS THE STOREHOUSE OF THE WESTERN CONFEDERACY. WAGON TRAINS LADEN WITH COTTON – LIFE BLOOD OF THE SOUTH – CROSSED THE STATE TO MEXICO TO TRADE FOR MEDICAL SUPPLIES, CLOTHING, MILITARY SUPPLIES. STATE AND PRIVATE INDUSTRY PRODUCED GUNS, AMMUNTION, WAGONS, POTS, KETTLES, LEATHER GOODS, SALT, HOSPITAL SUPPLIES. WIVES, SONS, DAUGHTERS, SLAVES PROVIDED CORN, COTTON, CLOTH, CATTLE, HOGS, CURED MEATS TO THE ARMY, GIVING MUCH, KEEPING LITTLE FOR THEMSELVES

ERECTED BY THE STATE OF TEXAS



Nancy Glitterati, an organizer of Lubbock Activists Striving to End Racism (L.A.S.E.R) recently said, “It [the Lubbock County Confederate Monument] creates this manipulative side of history, where these people aren’t necessarily heroes. It’s affecting everybody else’s history, people’s history that has to do with trauma, people’s history that are still dealing with and are still fighting for rights today.”

Michael Walker, commander of the Lubbock Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, responded to Glitterati. He said, “All they’re doing is trying to destroy history and you cannot destroy history. We believe that everybody has a right to honor their ancestors.”

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RobertP

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Location
Dallas
They will finally get it. It is just a matter of time. So sad.
Lubbock and West Texas as a whole are extremely conservative and independent. Some of the nicest people anywhere but they don’t like others telling them what to do. There may be pressure from some student groups and faculty at Texas Tech there, so we’ll see what happens.
 

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