Restricted Debate Lincoln question

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MikeyB

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In Lincoln, they illustrate a conversation between Lincoln and Stephens where Lincoln says the would need 2 Southern states to ratify. And Stephens mentioned Louisiana and Tennessee and then Lincoln said, Yes, and probably Arkansas too.

Assuming this conversation is grounded in good history, what was going on in LA, TN and AR that they would be likely to ratify the 13th amendment? Was sentiment of the people shifting after years of occupation and perhaps even a rebuilding of commerce and daily livelihoods? Or was it simply a function of there being strong pro-union governments in place that would steamroll the ratification process, even if not the most democratically elected or representative of the sentiments of the people?

mike
 

John Hartwell

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Louisiana, at least, had a Unionist legislature elected from the Union-occupied parts of the state. Of course, only men who had signed an Oath of Allegiance could vote. So, there was a 'legal,' if not exactly representative legislature to ratify the amendment. Note, however, that in New Orleans more votes were cast in the fall 1862 Unionist election, than in the 1860 election that chose the secessionist legislature.

I expect the situation was similar in Tennessee.
 

MikeyB

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Louisiana, at least, had a Unionist legislature elected from the Union-occupied parts of the state. Of course, only men who had signed an Oath of Allegiance could vote. So, there was a 'legal,' if not exactly representative legislature to ratify the amendment. Note, however, that in New Orleans more votes were cast in the fall 1862 Unionist election, than in the 1860 election that chose the secessionist legislature.

I expect the situation was similar in Tennessee.
Thanks for the post. That's interesting about the 1862 election data. Does this suggest that Louisiana was never a die-hard secessionist state? Or when New Orleans is occupied and you have Union troops everywhere, the people switch sentiments pretty quickly as a matter of practicality?
 
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