John Cunningham farm.

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The farm is located about two miles from the Wheatfield near Marsh Creek and was used as a Confederate hospital.My wife's gg uncle Beden Bebout who served with the 140th PVI was wounded at the Stony Hill near the Wheatfield and taken to the "Cunningham Barnyard".My research indicates that many of the wounded Confederates there were from the 16th Georgia.Does anybody have more info?
 
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lelliott19

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The farm is located about two miles from the Wheatfield near Marsh Creek and was used as a Confederate hospital.My wife's gg uncle Beden Bebout who served with the 140th PVI was wounded at the Stony Hill near the Wheatfield and taken to the "Cunningham Barnyard".My research indicates that many of the wounded Confederates there were from the 16th Georgia.Does anybody have more info?
Hello @glossypinner and welcome to Civil War Talk - the best place on the internet for Civil War discussion. There's actually a whole thread here about the Hospitals at Marsh Creek, including Cunningham's which served as the Brigade Hospital for Wofford's brigade (16th, 18th, 24th Georgia, Cobb's and Phillip's Legions.)
The Cunningham Farm was the farm of John Cunningham and it is still standing! Located across the creek from the battlefield, accessible by a ford, from Crawford's. "Crawfords" was the John S. Crawford Farm, on the battlefield side of Marsh Creek. Crawford's served as the field hospital for the wounded of Semme's and Barksdale's brigades.

The good news regarding your wife's 2x great uncle is that, even though in the hands of the enemy, he would have had as good a care as possible under the circumstances. Wofford's brigade was composed of veteran regiments and had skilled surgeons. If you have read many accounts of wounded in the hands of the enemy, you will find that both sides were pretty good at taking care of the wounded from the opposing side. Those who had fought through many battles seemed to be bound together in a strange way by their shared experiences - even though fighting on opposite sides - and so those wounded who fell into the hands of the enemy seem to have faired better when the regiment/brigade that took them prisoner were veterans.

Here's a link to the thread about the Marsh Creek hospitals with pictures and some first hand accounts
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/se...-hospitals-at-gettysburg.117549/#post-1195271
 
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lelliott19

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Also, I have found that reading accounts from the opposing side sometimes reveals some "new" information that perhaps was not recorded by the regiment you are researching. This thread about Wofford's brigade might reveal some information you had not previously uncovered in your research. It's pretty long and includes some details about the activities of other CS brigades, so if you get lost or have questions, please don't hesitate to ask. If I can't answer your questions, @Tom Elmore or @rpkennedy probably can. :D
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/ch...ds-brigade-at-gettysburg.128886/#post-1425133
 

Tom Elmore

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#6
It would be unusual for Federal soldiers to be transported as far back as the John Cunningham farm. I regard it as an act of kindness or respect on the part of the Confederates to devote an ambulance for this purpose. However, after the Confederates retreated, those same Federal soldiers in more remote locations would tend to be overlooked by their own citizens. Greg Coco, in A Vast Sea of Misery, cites an August 7, 1863 article in a Michigan newspaper that illustrates the point:

(Two nurses, Mrs. Brain and Mrs. Barnard) accidentally learned the revolting fact, that two or three Union soldiers were lying in a barn, about three miles from town. The barn belongs to a Mr. Cunningham, a true Union man, and is used as a rebel hospital. They immediately set out, after ascertaining the facts in the case, determined to remedy the thing, by having them brought to town. They visited the barn ... and found them; but in a sad and neglected condition, having laid on a bundle of straw for four weeks with broken thigh bones, and that, too, without being set or cared for properly. The rebel surgeon in charge of the hospital seemed to be a humane man, and rendered an excuse for their condition, that he had nothing to do with it; but this was really no excuse., for everything that was needed could have been had by simply asking for it. ... One of them belonged to the 4th Michigan. ...

I have no further information on the two nurses. Corporal Beden Beabout (alternative spelling) of Company D had his leg amputated, but died on August 9, according to, Union Casualties at Gettysburg, by Travis W. and John W. Busey, 2:941. A Corporal James A. Beabout (a brother?) of the same company was listed as killed.

At Gettysburg, the companies of the 140th were arranged in this order (from left to right): A – E – H – B – K – D – G – F – C. Company K was the color company. Early on in their fight on July 2, the three right companies of the regiment were pushed out into the open field west of the woods that are on the west side of the Wheatfield and, thus exposed, suffered the highest casualties. Company D would have been just at the edge of the woods, squaring off primarily against men of the 3rd South Carolina of Kershaw's brigade, who were assisted by the 2nd South Carolina and a few men of the 50th Georgia of Semmes' brigade. I would guess that Beden and James Beabout were most likely struck down between 6:25 to 6:55 p.m. on July 2, when Wofford's advance compelled the remaining members of the regiment to hastily withdraw. My attached draft map shows the estimated situation at 6:45 p.m.
 

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Tom Elmore

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#7
Attached are two photographs, the first from behind a boulder (facing southwest) that men from Company D of the 140th Pennsylvania might have taken refuge behind. The second photograph (from the Confederate perspective) faces northeast up the slope where the 140th was posted, from the approximate position of the 2nd South Carolina.
GettysburgLoop140PA.JPG
GettysburgLoop.JPG
 
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#8
It would be unusual for Federal soldiers to be transported as far back as the John Cunningham farm. I regard it as an act of kindness or respect on the part of the Confederates to devote an ambulance for this purpose. However, after the Confederates retreated, those same Federal soldiers in more remote locations would tend to be overlooked by their own citizens. Greg Coco, in A Vast Sea of Misery, cites an August 7, 1863 article in a Michigan newspaper that illustrates the point:

(Two nurses, Mrs. Brain and Mrs. Barnard) accidentally learned the revolting fact, that two or three Union soldiers were lying in a barn, about three miles from town. The barn belongs to a Mr. Cunningham, a true Union man, and is used as a rebel hospital. They immediately set out, after ascertaining the facts in the case, determined to remedy the thing, by having them brought to town. They visited the barn ... and found them; but in a sad and neglected condition, having laid on a bundle of straw for four weeks with broken thigh bones, and that, too, without being set or cared for properly. The rebel surgeon in charge of the hospital seemed to be a humane man, and rendered an excuse for their condition, that he had nothing to do with it; but this was really no excuse., for everything that was needed could have been had by simply asking for it. ... One of them belonged to the 4th Michigan. ...

I have no further information on the two nurses. Corporal Beden Beabout (alternative spelling) of Company D had his leg amputated, but died on August 9, according to, Union Casualties at Gettysburg, by Travis W. and John W. Busey, 2:941. A Corporal James A. Beabout (a brother?) of the same company was listed as killed.

At Gettysburg, the companies of the 140th were arranged in this order (from left to right): A – E – H – B – K – D – G – F – C. Company K was the color company. Early on in their fight on July 2, the three right companies of the regiment were pushed out into the open field west of the woods that are on the west side of the Wheatfield and, thus exposed, suffered the highest casualties. Company D would have been just at the edge of the woods, squaring off primarily against men of the 3rd South Carolina of Kershaw's brigade, who were assisted by the 2nd South Carolina and a few men of the 50th Georgia of Semmes' brigade. I would guess that Beden and James Beabout were most likely struck down between 6:25 to 6:55 p.m. on July 2, when Wofford's advance compelled the remaining members of the regiment to hastily withdraw. My attached draft map shows the estimated situation at 6:45 p.m.
 
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#9
It would be unusual for Federal soldiers to be transported as far back as the John Cunningham farm. I regard it as an act of kindness or respect on the part of the Confederates to devote an ambulance for this purpose. However, after the Confederates retreated, those same Federal soldiers in more remote locations would tend to be overlooked by their own citizens. Greg Coco, in A Vast Sea of Misery, cites an August 7, 1863 article in a Michigan newspaper that illustrates the point:

(Two nurses, Mrs. Brain and Mrs. Barnard) accidentally learned the revolting fact, that two or three Union soldiers were lying in a barn, about three miles from town. The barn belongs to a Mr. Cunningham, a true Union man, and is used as a rebel hospital. They immediately set out, after ascertaining the facts in the case, determined to remedy the thing, by having them brought to town. They visited the barn ... and found them; but in a sad and neglected condition, having laid on a bundle of straw for four weeks with broken thigh bones, and that, too, without being set or cared for properly. The rebel surgeon in charge of the hospital seemed to be a humane man, and rendered an excuse for their condition, that he had nothing to do with it; but this was really no excuse., for everything that was needed could have been had by simply asking for it. ... One of them belonged to the 4th Michigan. ...

I have no further information on the two nurses. Corporal Beden Beabout (alternative spelling) of Company D had his leg amputated, but died on August 9, according to, Union Casualties at Gettysburg, by Travis W. and John W. Busey, 2:941. A Corporal James A. Beabout (a brother?) of the same company was listed as killed.

At Gettysburg, the companies of the 140th were arranged in this order (from left to right): A – E – H – B – K – D – G – F – C. Company K was the color company. Early on in their fight on July 2, the three right companies of the regiment were pushed out into the open field west of the woods that are on the west side of the Wheatfield and, thus exposed, suffered the highest casualties. Company D would have been just at the edge of the woods, squaring off primarily against men of the 3rd South Carolina of Kershaw's brigade, who were assisted by the 2nd South Carolina and a few men of the 50th Georgia of Semmes' brigade. I would guess that Beden and James Beabout were most likely struck down between 6:25 to 6:55 p.m. on July 2, when Wofford's advance compelled the remaining members of the regiment to hastily withdraw. My attached draft map shows the estimated situation at 6:45 p.m.
Thanks for all the detailed information.Beden and James Bebout were brothers.James is probably buried with the unknown in the National Cemetery and Beden's remains were returned to Amity Pa.
 

lelliott19

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The rebel surgeon in charge of the hospital seemed to be a humane man, and rendered an excuse for their condition, that he had nothing to do with it;
Tom do we know with certainty who was the surgeon left responsible for the Cunningham Farm? I don't think it was Robert Pooler Myers, James Beverly Clifton, or Erwin James Eldridge (surgeons/asst surgeons of the 16th at various times.) As far as I can tell from diaries and dated letters, all of them accompanied the brigade on the retreat so none of them were left behind to care for the wounded at Cunningham's.

It may have been 24 yo. Acting Assistant Surgeon David H. Ramsaur, of the 18th Georgia? He seems to be the only medical officer of Wofford's brigade who was left behind. Ramsaur graduated 1861 with the M.D. degree, Medical Department of the University of Nashville, Nashville, TN. Although he had medical training, he enlisted as an infantryman 6/11/1861 and was 1st Sgt 8/2/1861. On 5/1/1863 he was Orderly Sgt and 06/01/1863 to 11/01/1863, listed as Acting Assistant Surgeon during which time he was captured and imprisoned at Fort McHenry, sent for exchange 11/21/1863. He was afterwards carried on the rolls of the 18th GA as a Lieutenant.
 

Tom Elmore

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#12
Tom do we know with certainty who was the surgeon left responsible for the Cunningham Farm? I don't think it was Robert Pooler Myers, James Beverly Clifton, or Erwin James Eldridge (surgeons/asst surgeons of the 16th at various times.) As far as I can tell from diaries and dated letters, all of them accompanied the brigade on the retreat so none of them were left behind to care for the wounded at Cunningham's.

It may have been 24 yo. Acting Assistant Surgeon David H. Ramsaur, of the 18th Georgia? He seems to be the only medical officer of Wofford's brigade who was left behind. Ramsaur graduated 1861 with the M.D. degree, Medical Department of the University of Nashville, Nashville, TN. Although he had medical training, he enlisted as an infantryman 6/11/1861 and was 1st Sgt 8/2/1861. On 5/1/1863 he was Orderly Sgt and 06/01/1863 to 11/01/1863, listed as Acting Assistant Surgeon during which time he was captured and imprisoned at Fort McHenry, sent for exchange 11/21/1863. He was afterwards carried on the rolls of the 18th GA as a Lieutenant.
Laura, you are right on the money. Ramsaur is the only medical officer of Wofford's brigade that I know of who was left behind with the wounded. Ramsaur graduated a M.D. from the University of Nashville's Medical Department in 1861. The overall surgeon in charge of the wounded of McLaw's division was Surgeon Francis William "Frank" Patterson (from the 17th Mississippi), but he was at the Bream's Mill hospital. Ramsaur would have reported to Patterson, who in turn submitted periodic reports of the number of wounded under his care to Federal authorities following the battle.
 

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Beden Bebout,Cephas Sharp,Isaac Lacock,and Charles Cunningham hired rebel soldiers to take them to the Cunningham barnyard.This is according to "Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington Co,Pa.1893"All were from Co D.
Interesting. Only the enemy dead were typically robbed of their money and possessions. I recall a Confederate officer lying on the field after the July 3 assault offer a handsome sum in gold to be taken off the field by a Federal soldier - the practice might not be so unusual after all. Confederates could use greenbacks, even back home, where they could be bartered with speculators for a substantially larger equivalent in Confederate currency from what I understand. Or perhaps one of those men from Company D may have possessed gold or silver coins, or something else of value to barter (like an expensive watch) that secured a ride for him and his three comrades. An ambulance usually carried two men apiece, but wagons were often pressed into service as ambulances, and one of the latter could accommodate all four men at the same time.
 
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Interesting. Only the enemy dead were typically robbed of their money and possessions. I recall a Confederate officer lying on the field after the July 3 assault offer a handsome sum in gold to be taken off the field by a Federal soldier - the practice might not be so unusual after all. Confederates could use greenbacks, even back home, where they could be bartered with speculators for a substantially larger equivalent in Confederate currency from what I understand. Or perhaps one of those men from Company D may have possessed gold or silver coins, or something else of value to barter (like an expensive watch) that secured a ride for him and his three comrades. An ambulance usually carried two men apiece, but wagons were often pressed into service as ambulances, and one of the latter could accommodate all four men at the same time.
The Cunningham barnyard shows up in at least a couple other accounts I have discovered.One account states that they paid two dollars each to the rebels.In this account Confederate surgeons amputated Cunningham's leg and they were all found by Union surgeons Wishart and Sharp after midnight July 6th and taken in ambulances to a house in Gettysburg.There is no mention of Beden Bebout's amputation but I assume it was done by Wishart or Sharp in the town.This account was provide by Isaac Sharp who was the brother of Cephas Sharp.Beden's remains were returned to Amity,Pa.
 

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#17
Medical staff of the 140th Pennsylvania at Gettysburg:

Surgeon John Wilson Wishart, graduate of Washington College, Pennsylvania in 1846; and the University of Pennsylvania in 1851.

Assistant Surgeon William Woolverton Sharpe, remained on the field for 16 days after the battle.

Hospital Steward Joseph W. Lawrence.
 
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Medical staff of the 140th Pennsylvania at Gettysburg:

Surgeon John Wilson Wishart, graduate of Washington College, Pennsylvania in 1846; and the University of Pennsylvania in 1851.

Assistant Surgeon William Woolverton Sharpe, remained on the field for 16 days after the battle.

Hospital Steward Joseph W. Lawrence.
William,Cephas,Isaac and Manean Sharp were brothers.Manean Sharp married Sarah Bebout and James Bebout married Elizabeth Jane Sharp.It's a little confusing but I think the bottom line is Isaac Sharp got the Cunningham barnyard information directly from his brother William Woolverton.
 



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