Irish in CSA army

KianGaf

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Dublin, Ireland

Drew

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Oct 22, 2012
An article from the largest daily newspaper in the country.
https://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/the-forgotten-war-hero-26747714.html

From the article:

"The majority (of Irishmen) were on the anti-slavery Union side."

LOL. The "Union side" really did not care about slavery. They cared about secession and "preserving the Union," which is why we call them, "the Union side."

Irishman Patrick Cleburne is in fact well-remembered not only his generalship, but for his proposal to make soldiers of slaves. It was controversial but Cleburne's idea was ultimately endorsed by Virginian Robert E. Lee.

'Tis a complicated subject, but I'm glad to see General Cleburne is remembered in Ireland. Thanks for posting.
 

Pat Young

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Irishman Patrick Cleburne is in fact well-remembered not only his generalship, but for his proposal to make soldiers of slaves. It was controversial but Cleburne's idea was ultimately endorsed by Virginian Robert E. Lee.
Just a technical note: Cleburne did not suggest enlisting slaves as soldiers. He insisted that the men who were to be recruited needed to be freed from slavery first. He did not believe that a slave could be a soldier. He also suggested that as long as slavery was continued, blacks would not enlist since they would be fighting for their families to stay enslaved. He actually made the fairly radical suggestion that some emancipation program would need to be in place for his plans to be successful.
 

Rusk County Avengers

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https://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/irishmen-in-the-confederate-army/

Found this article online. I wasn't aware there was artifacts from the war on display in our national museum. I will go there in the near future and put up some photographs.

An article from the largest daily newspaper in the country.
https://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/the-forgotten-war-hero-26747714.html

I can't believe there's no mention of the Irishmen of Company F of the 1st TX Heavy Artillery the "Davis Guards". They were under the command of a Captain Oldlum, then during the battle that made them famous under the direct command of Lt. Richard "Dick" Dowling from Ireland.

They became famous manning the guns, and defending Fort Griffin at Sabine Pass, (on the Texas and Louisiana border where the Sabine River empty's into the Gulf of Mexico). They defended the fort outnumbered and outgunned and wrecked two Union gunboats, capturing them, inflicted some 200 casualties, capturing I forget how many from the surrendered crews, turned back a Union invasion fleet of between 5,000-10,000 men (depending on the source), and done all of that, without taking a single casualty. Oh and during the battle they did with only 42 men.

I would have thought they would have been the most famous Irish unit, as they are literally the only Confederate soldiers to get medals during the war. Contrary to popular belief they weren't all Irish, some of their men were English and Irish decent Americans, but they were mostly Irish. Their action at the second Battle of Sabine Pass was called the "most remarkable feat of the war".
 

johan_steele

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From the article:

"The majority (of Irishmen) were on the anti-slavery Union side."

LOL. The "Union side" really did not care about slavery. They cared about secession and "preserving the Union," which is why we call them, "the Union side."

Irishman Patrick Cleburne is in fact well-remembered not only his generalship, but for his proposal to make soldiers of slaves. It was controversial but Cleburne's idea was ultimately endorsed by Virginian Robert E. Lee.

'Tis a complicated subject, but I'm glad to see General Cleburne is remembered in Ireland. Thanks for posting.

But those who opposed slavery were overwhelmingly on the US side. You conveniently forget that Cleburne was censured and would never gain higher rank, largely because of his stance about black men making decent soldiers.

Cleburne was a real soldier with real experience. The Irish had a reputation for making good soldiers to anyone who served anywhere near them. Overwhelmingly the Irish did not support the CS for the simple reason of slavery. Those who have been little better than slaves rarely condone it.
 

KianGaf

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Location
Dublin, Ireland
I must look out for his grave in Glasnevin cemetery, which is where our celebrity’s from the past are buried along with a million other souls.
 

KianGaf

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May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
I have an account with their geneogly department after searching for my great grandfathers grave who fought in our own revolution. I bought some credits and found this entry, the next occasion I’m there I will seek the grave out.

E510C1E0-88AA-45C8-9196-F188ED80D0C5.jpeg
 

KianGaf

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Location
Dublin, Ireland
I can't believe there's no mention of the Irishmen of Company F of the 1st TX Heavy Artillery the "Davis Guards". They were under the command of a Captain Oldlum, then during the battle that made them famous under the direct command of Lt. Richard "Dick" Dowling from Ireland.

They became famous manning the guns, and defending Fort Griffin at Sabine Pass, (on the Texas and Louisiana border where the Sabine River empty's into the Gulf of Mexico). They defended the fort outnumbered and outgunned and wrecked two Union gunboats, capturing them, inflicted some 200 casualties, capturing I forget how many from the surrendered crews, turned back a Union invasion fleet of between 5,000-10,000 men (depending on the source), and done all of that, without taking a single casualty. Oh and during the battle they did with only 42 men.

I would have thought they would have been the most famous Irish unit, as they are literally the only Confederate soldiers to get medals during the war. Contrary to popular belief they weren't all Irish, some of their men were English and Irish decent Americans, but they were mostly Irish. Their action at the second Battle of Sabine Pass was called the "most remarkable feat of the war".

Seen a segment about that battle in a documentary. I said that Jefferson Davis was so impressed he awarded them a confederate version of the Medal of Honor.
 

Rio Bravo

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Joseph White Latimer ( 1843-1863 )- “ The Boy Major “ was a promising young Officer in the AONV’s Artillery branch. He was Commander, Artillery Battalion, Johnson’s Division, Ewell’s 2nd Corps & was mortally wounded at Gettysburg.
To the Glory of God, and in memory of this brave Irish Southerner, who found his final rest in service.
Let his brave deeds be never forgotten nor his sacrifice have been in vain for the Confederate cause.
 

Polloco

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Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I can't believe there's no mention of the Irishmen of Company F of the 1st TX Heavy Artillery the "Davis Guards". They were under the command of a Captain Oldlum, then during the battle that made them famous under the direct command of Lt. Richard "Dick" Dowling from Ireland.

They became famous manning the guns, and defending Fort Griffin at Sabine Pass, (on the Texas and Louisiana border where the Sabine River empty's into the Gulf of Mexico). They defended the fort outnumbered and outgunned and wrecked two Union gunboats, capturing them, inflicted some 200 casualties, capturing I forget how many from the surrendered crews, turned back a Union invasion fleet of between 5,000-10,000 men (depending on the source), and done all of that, without taking a single casualty. Oh and during the battle they did with only 42 men.

I would have thought they would have been the most famous Irish unit, as they are literally the only Confederate soldiers to get medals during the war. Contrary to popular belief they weren't all Irish, some of their men were English and Irish decent Americans, but they were mostly Irish. Their action at the second Battle of Sabine Pass was called the "most remarkable feat of the war".
Anyone who likes to study the Civil War would do themselves a favor by reading up on this battle. Texas don't have near as much to offer as some other states but Sabine Pass was one of the "biggies". What so few men did is amazing. Jefferson Davis sure thought so.
 

KianGaf

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Location
Dublin, Ireland
Anyone who likes to study the Civil War would do themselves a favor by reading up on this battle. Texas don't have near as much to offer as some other states but Sabine Pass was one of the "biggies". What so few men did is amazing. Jefferson Davis sure thought so.

The cotton smuggling was a very interesting aspect of the role Texas had to play.

On the other hand it was only smuggling in the unions eyes. It was legitimate international trade to the confederate government.
 

SeaSoldier

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Sep 17, 2018
Location
Texas
Irish, Scotch-Irish, Scotts, Norwegians - Scandinavians, Germans - almost NONE of them approved of slavery. Cleburne knew a freeman would fight for home and hearth so, the applicant had to be given something for his service and this freedom would have extended to his family.

Immediately near the end of the conflict, some of these groups were known to "own slaves". My personal opinion, is that they claimed to own these slaves or have the slaves conscripted into military service. This was not something many wanted to see.

Fredricksburg, Texas was a basically German settlement and many (about 20) went on a "hunting trip" headed south to the Mexican border to go "North". There were many Unionists in Fredricksburg, Kerrville, New Braunfels and other settlements to include San Antonio, Texas.

Slave and cotton were both "contraband". In 1861, cotton sold for 10 cents a pound. Cotton was moving 24/7 from San Antonio (coming in from as far away as Arkansas & Missouri and other points, run down the road to Brownfield and into Mexico. Civilians and officers of both sides, would exchange cotton, and often to line their own pockets. Post Civil War, cotton got up to around 25 cents a pound. 4 pounds was equal to a good day's wages.

I have an ancestor (Irish descendent great G. Grandfather living in Alabama) who, along with 4 brothers, served in the Confederacy and not one owned a slave. My other side has an Irish great G Grandfather who was born in 1845. His parents arrived in Canada from Ireland.
 

KianGaf

Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
Finally got around to reading Sam Watkins memoir. I’m only started it but early on at the battle of cheat mountain I think it was , an Irish solider gets killed. He said that mans name was Pat Hanley first tennessee company h. I googled the name but little came up I’ll do some more digging.
 

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