Hidden/Forgotten Graves

NH Civil War Gal

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I'm currently reading a book that I'm finding most compelling, "Sabres and Spurs" The First Regiment Rhode Island Cavalry in the Civil War, 1861-1865, by Frederic Denison, Chaplain.

He is describing their camp, renamed Camp Reliance that is one mile northwest of Catlett Station. He is talking about some deaths from typhoid that happened in camp. "The solemnity of such funerals, far from our homes, in the camps of war, parting with brave and loved comrades, whose graves even we must soon forsake, perhaps never again to be found, left deep, indelible impressions upon our hearts."

First, does anyone know if these graves were found or what is there now?

Second, I've wondered just how many hundreds/thousands lost graves there are as a result of the Civil War.

Edited to add: This was in Virginia
 
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bayouace

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Colonel Cahill took command of Union forces at The Battle of Baton Rouge following General Williams death, and refused a truce for the burial of dead. Many of the dead Confederates left behind were buried in a long pit, which is now under Florida Blvd in Baton Rouge. How sad is that.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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Colonel Cahill took command of Union forces at The Battle of Baton Rouge following General Williams death, and refused a truce for the burial of dead. Many of the dead Confederates left behind were buried in a long pit, which is now under Florida Blvd in Baton Rouge. How sad is that.

That is very sad! But when Florida Blvd was being built, didn't anyone know or protest that?

I've also read where many Union soldiers were buried in the levees along the Mississippi, which I'm guessing are mostly sand, and those graves must have been washed away during floods and such.
 

bayouace

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That is very sad! But when Florida Blvd was being built, didn't anyone know or protest that?

I've also read where many Union soldiers were buried in the levees along the Mississippi, which I'm guessing are mostly sand, and those graves must have been washed away during floods and such.
I suppose there was not much in the way of remains still there by the time it was paved. Of course no coffins were used, and whatever was left was all jumbled together with no identification.
 

bayouace

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That is very sad! But when Florida Blvd was being built, didn't anyone know or protest that?

I've also read where many Union soldiers were buried in the levees along the Mississippi, which I'm guessing are mostly sand, and those graves must have been washed away during floods and such.
No levee at downtown Baton Rouge in 1862. The river washed some Union coffins up and across the river, even before the battle. The coffins were found on plantations across the river. I know not what happened to them. Possibly reburied on the plantations, or returned to the Union forces.
 

Biscoitos

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I'm currently reading a book that I'm finding most compelling, "Sabres and Spurs" The First Regiment Rhode Island Cavalry in the Civil War, 1861-1865, by Frederic Denison, Chaplain.

He is describing their camp, renamed Camp Reliance that is one mile northwest of Catlett Station. He is talking about some deaths from typhoid that happened in camp. "The solemnity of such funerals, far from our homes, in the camps of war, parting with brave and loved comrades, whose graves even we must soon forsake, perhaps never again to be found, left deep, indelible impressions upon our hearts."

First, does anyone know if these graves were found or what is there now?

Second, I've wondered just how many hundreds/thousands lost graves there are as a result of the Civil War.

Edited to add: This was in Virginia
"But beneath a cedar or pine in solitude austere,
Unknown, unarmed, but not forgotten,
Rests a faithful volunteer."
 

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