1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

Help Build a Reconstruction Timeline Reconstruction150

Discussion in 'Post Civil War History, The Reconstruction Period' started by Pat Young, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I have been trying to collect resources on Reconstruction for CWT for the last 9 months. One thing I have had a hard time fining is a really comprehensive Reconstruction timeline. So, I started building one myself.

    I am a long way from finishing, and I am fairly new to the subject. Anyone have any suggestions for stuff that should go on it? If you do, please post the event, the date it happened, and, if possible, a link to more info. I will try to put the info you send on the timeline.
     
    AndyHall and chellers like this.

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
  4. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,970
    Great idea, Pat. I just pulled out my "Reconstruction Notes" from the 4 or 5 videos that I have watched on the topic. I may have missed it on your timeline, so feel free to tell me. (looks like obsessive note-taking comes in handy)

    Freedmen Bureau Established Mar 3, 1865 The temporary Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (known as the Freedmen's Bureau) is established within the War Department.

    Pardon’s Issued May 1865 Johnson's strict pardon policy has been abandoned; wealthy planters are quickly brought back into the union. By September, hundreds of pardons were being issued in a single day—some 13,000 in all.

    13th Amendment Ratified Dec 18, 1865 The Thirteenth Amendment is ratified, prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude.

    Johnson Declares End to Reconstruction Dec 1, 1865 President Johnson declares the reconstruction process complete. Outraged, Radical Republicans in Congress refuse to recognize new governments in southern states.

    In 1866, Tennessee became the first former Confederate state to ratify the Fourteenth Amendment,

    Tennessee Returns to Union Jul 24, 1866 Tennessee is the first former Confederate state readmitted to the Union.

    The Civil Rights Act of 1866, 14 Stat.27-30, enacted April 9, 1866, was the first United States federal law to define citizenship and affirm that all citizens are equally protected by the law.[1]

    Reconstruction Acts. (March 2, 1867, 14 Stat. 428-430, c.153; March 23, 1867, 15 Stat. 2-5, c.6; July 19, 1867, 15 Stat. 14-16, c.30; and March 11, 1868, 15 Stat. 41, c.25)

    New Orleans riot, which occurred on July 30, 1866

    Impeachment of Andrew Johnson:The trial lasted from March to May, 1868. The political backing to begin impeachment came when Johnson breached the Tenure of Office Act by removing Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War, from his cabinet. The Tenure of Office Act had been passed over Johnson's veto in 1867 and stated that a President could not dismiss appointed officials without the consent of Congress.

    Arkansas Returns to Union Jun 22, 1868

    Louisiana, Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina are readmitted to the Union. June 25, 1868

    Alabama Readmitted Jul 14, 1868

    14th Amendment - ratified in 1868

    Proclamation 179 - Granting Full Pardon and Amnesty for the Offense of Treason Against the United States During the Late Civil War December 25, 1868

    Oscar J. Dunn, Former slave elected lieutenant governor of Louisiana, 1868

    Texas v. White Apr 1, 1869 In its 5-3 Texas v. White decision, the U.S. Supreme Court declares Radical Reconstruction constitutional, stating that secession from the Union is illegal.

    Virginia Readmitted Jan 26, 1870

    Mississippi Readmitted Feb 23, 1870

    The 15th Amendment, granting African-American men the right to vote, was formally adopted into the U.S. Constitution on March 30, 1870

    Texas Readmitted Mar 30, 1870

    Georgia Readmitted Jul 15, 1870


    Freedmen's Bureau ended. In 1872, Congress abruptly abandoned the program, effectively shutting down the Bureau by refusing to approve renewal legislation.

    Slaughterhouse Cases - The Slaughter-House Cases, 83 U.S.36 (1873), was the first United States Supreme Court interpretation of the recently enacted Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. It was a pivotal case in early civil rights law, reading the Fourteenth Amendment as protecting the "privileges or immunities" conferred by virtue of Federal, United States citizenship, to all individuals of all states within it; but not to protect the various privileges or immunities incident to citizenship of a state. However, Federal rights of citizenship were at that time few (such as the right to travel between states and to use navigable rivers); the 14th Amendment did not protect the far broader range of rights covered by state citizenship. In effect, the 14th Amendment was interpreted to convey limited protection pertinent to a small minority of rights.

    April 24, 1877 The last federal troops were withdrawn from the southern states, bringing Reconstruction to an end.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
    chellers, kepi, DRW and 1 other person like this.
  5. DRW

    DRW Sergeant

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    New York
    Great idea Pat. I found that I could read a lot of the respected works about Reconstruction and still struggle to have a good sense of a linear narrative about the important facts/dates of Reconstruction; certainly not on the level to tell a comprehensible story to another person. This was the problem that inspired me to research Recon more deeply and write about it.
     
  6. chellers

    chellers Brigadier General Moderator Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Messages:
    10,062
    Location:
    East Texas
    This is excellent, Mr. Young and Bee. As DRW mentioned, the timeline will be very handy and helpful.

    Thanks to both for your efforts, time, and help.

    Chellers
     
  7. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Thanks. These are great.
     
    chellers likes this.
  8. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I had that problem reading the Dunning School books. They were often organized thematically and I had a hard time keeping the chronology straight. I have read more on Reconstruction in the last 14 months than over the entire rest of my life and I am struggling with chronology.
     
    DRW likes this.
  9. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I started putting some of your suggestions on the timeline.
     
    chellers likes this.
  10. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,970
    Glad to Bee of service,

    Sincerely,

    Certified List Junkie
     
    chellers and Pat Young like this.
  11. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I am taking advantage of your listomania.
     
    chellers and Bee like this.
  12. James N.

    James N. Major Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
    Annual Winner
    Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2013
    Messages:
    7,596
    Location:
    East Texas
    Bee, here are a few incidents you might want to add, two "riots", "murders", or "massacres", depending on your point of view; and their resulting court cases:

    The first occurred on Oct. 4, 1868 and I described it in this thread:

    http://civilwartalk.com/threads/murder-in-jefferson-texas-oct-4-1868.121598/

    The trial that resulted out of it lasted May 24 - August 19, 1869.

    The second incident was the so-called Colfax, La. Riot or Massacre:


    "The Colfax massacre, or Colfax riot as the events are termed on the 1950 state historic marker, occurred on Easter Sunday, April 13, 1873, in Colfax, Louisiana, the seat of Grant Parish, during confrontation between opposing political forces of the Republicans and Democrats...

    Federal prosecution and conviction of a few perpetrators at Colfax under the Enforcement Acts was appealed to the Supreme Court. In a key case, the court ruled in United States v. Cruikshank (1876) that protections of the Fourteenth Amendment did not apply to the actions of individuals, but only to the actions of state governments. After this ruling, the federal government could no longer use the Enforcement Act of 1870 to prosecute actions by paramilitary groups such as the White League, which had chapters forming across Louisiana beginning in 1874. Intimidation and black voter suppression by such paramilitary groups were instrumental to the Democratic Party regaining political control in the state legislature by the late 1870s."
     
    Bee likes this.
  13. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,970
    Hi James,

    I saw this case last night -- this morning at 1am -- but, I just couldn't read anymore text...! I am glad that you brought it up.
     
  14. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Let's see if I can embed this:

    Apparently, the answer is "no."
     
  15. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
  16. Drew

    Drew Captain

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    6,421
    In My Opinion

    Severe economic contraction, depression, usually impacts (often negatively) seemingly unrelated social and political developments.

    For that reason, the Panic of 1873 and the depression it ushered in belongs on any Reconstruction timeline.
     
    James N., DRW and Pat Young like this.
  17. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    That is a great suggestion. I'll add it tonight.
     
    chellers and Drew like this.
  18. Bee

    Bee 1st Lieutenant Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Gettysburg 2017

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,970
    The timeline is coming along nicely, Pat :smile: I may actually figure out what happened during Reconstruction, after all.
     
    chellers likes this.
  19. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Thanks. I needed to understand the chronology better myself.
     
    Bee likes this.
  20. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    20,389
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I added the Panic of 1873 and the subsequent Tompkins Square riot to the timeline.
     
    Bee likes this.
  21. James N.

    James N. Major Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
    Annual Winner
    Featured Book Reviewer

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2013
    Messages:
    7,596
    Location:
    East Texas
    A minor quibble, Pat; I don't think the Black Union Missionary Church in Jefferson was burned until later than the October, 1868, unrest there.
     
    Pat Young likes this.

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

Share This Page


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)