Harriet Tubman: A presentation

matthew mckeon

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On Sunday, I was at the Adams Free Library in Adams, Mass. A living historian did a first person presentation of Harriet Tubman.

The "Great Hall" the auditorium on the 2nd floor of the library is interesting to the student of the Civil War. It had been the GAR meeting room until the 1920s, there was a stand of rifled muskets and swords on display, the portrait of a young man, George Sayres, who died in the room, and whom the GAR post was named. There were two unique podiums, whose wooden bases were carved into the shape of a cannon and mortar respectively, including wooden cannon balls and rammers.
 

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matthew mckeon

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The presenter did a pretty good job in my opinion. She looked like Tubman, down to the somewhat scowly expression.

Tubman had what I think of as a "miniseries" life. Episode one is her childhood in Maryland, a not particularly happy one. Episode two is her work for the underground railroad, both in retrieving people and the politics and fundraising in the North. Episode three is her work in the Civil War, and episode four her postwar association with the women's suffrage movement and struggle to get a pension in recognition of her efforts during the war. Pat Young has posted about restoring her home in New York as a museum.

Very interesting figure in history. I look forward to the miniseries, which, in a perfect world, should be directed by John Woo as a breathless thriller.
 

Northern Light

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The presenter did a pretty good job in my opinion. She looked like Tubman, down to the somewhat scowly expression.

Tubman had what I think of as a "miniseries" life. Episode one is her childhood in Maryland, a not particularly happy one. Episode two is her work for the underground railroad, both in retrieving people and the politics and fundraising in the North. Episode three is her work in the Civil War, and episode four her postwar association with the women's suffrage movement and struggle to get a pension in recognition of her efforts during the war. Pat Young has posted about restoring her home in New York as a museum.

Very interesting figure in history. I look forward to the miniseries, which, in a perfect world, should be directed by John Woo as a breathless thriller.
Wouldn't that be amazing? Do you suppose it would ever be made?
 

matthew mckeon

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Wouldn't that be amazing? Do you suppose it would ever be made?
I hope so. If it was a movie, not a miniseries, it really should focus on either the antebellum underground railroad, or her wartime career. And it should be a suspense film, not Masterpiece Theater. Aren't I the expert?

My only criticism of the presentation would be there is so much there, she could only touch on some highlights.
 

Northern Light

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I hope so. If it was a movie, not a miniseries, it really should focus on either the antebellum underground railroad, or her wartime career. And it should be a suspense film, not Masterpiece Theater. Aren't I the expert?

My only criticism of the presentation would be there is so much there, she could only touch on some highlights.
That is the problem with someone who has such an eventful life, but you really can not due just part and still make sense of the whole. A mini-series would work though.
 



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