General Robert E. Lee Speaks at Gettysburg

Tom Elmore

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#1
I thought it might be interesting to gather some perhaps lesser known or overlooked examples where participants quote General Robert E. Lee in their recollections of the battle. It provides a unique perspective of Lee in his own words (or rather a close approximation of his words based on the memory of the individual on the receiving end of the conversation). The times listed are approximate. Lee’s words are highlighted in bold; the rest of the conversation is abbreviated, inserted mainly to add context. Personally I most enjoy Lee’s comparatively gentle teaching moments with more junior subordinates, and his equipoise and leadership after the stinging repulse of his attack on July 3.

About 4:20 p.m., July 1, to Lieutenant Colonel John J. Garnett, commanding an artillery battalion: Lee asked if my guns would reach a large body of enemy troops in the distance. Informed they would, Lee said, “They seem to be moving towards the Emmitsburg Road, do they not?” “Place your batteries on Seminary Ridge and either disperse them of develop the purpose of their movement.” [John J. Garnett, Gettysburg: A Complete Historical Narrative of the Battle ...]

About 9 a.m., July 2, to Major William T. Poague, commanding an artillery battalion: Lee called Poague over to ask, “Have you seen General Longstreet or any of his troops anywhere in this neighborhood?” Poague replied he had not. “I wonder where General Longstreet can be?” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 1 p.m., July 2, to Major William T. Poague: “Major, you have sent some rather vague information about a body of troops somewhere. Please tell me all you know about it.” Poague said they appeared to be an infantry column. “What troops are they, the enemy’s or ours?” Poague could not tell. “In what direction are they moving?” Poague could not say. “On what road are they?” Poague did not know. “Well, Major, what do you know?” Poague responded, “Only what I reported.” “It is very important while in enemy’s country that officers obtain all the information possible about the geography of the region and especially about the different roads. This can be gotten by inquiring of the citizens in the neighborhood. Their reports should be as full and definite as can be made.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 11 p.m., July 2, to Lieutenant General A. P. Hill, during a gathering at Lee’s headquarters: General J. E. B. Stuart had arrived, and when Lee heard the voice of A. P. Hill he moved through the crowd, shaking Hill by the hand and said, “It is all well, General, everything is all well.” [William H. Swallow, Early’s Division, Southern Bivouac, vol. IV, June 1885 – May 1886; Reprint, Broadfoot Publishing Company, 1993]

Morning, July 3, to Major George B. Gerald, 18th Mississippi: Lee rode up and asked, “What troops are these and who commands them?” Gerald answered the remnants of Barksdale’s brigade, and he commanded them. Lee pointed to the crest of a hill some 200 yards distant and slightly to the rear and said he was going to place 100 pieces of artillery there and for Gerald to position his men to prevent the artillery from being harassed by Federal infantry. [Judge G. B. Gerald, The Battle of Gettysburg, Waco Daily Times-Herald, July 3, 1913]

About 10 a.m., July 3, to Major James Dearing, commanding an artillery battalion: “My friend! This way is you please.” Dearing approached on horseback. “Ah! Major, excuse me; I thought you might be some countryman who had missed his way. Let me say to you and these young officers, that I am an old reconnoitering officer and have always found it best to go afoot, and not expose oneself needlessly.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:20 p.m., July 3, to Major William T. Poague: “How are you off for ammunition, Major.” Poague reported a dwindling supply but said six howitzers were coming up with full chests. “Ah, that’s well; we may need them.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to soldiers returning from the failed infantry charge: “Men, go to the brook down there and rest and refresh yourselves.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to soldiers returning from the failed infantry charge: “All this will come right in the end. We’ll talk it over afterwards; but in the meantime, all good men must rally. We want all good and true men just now.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to British Colonel Arthur Fremantle, an observer with the army: “This has been a sad day for us, Colonel – a sad day; but we can’t always expect to gain victories.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:40 p.m., July 3, to a member of his staff who was whipping his horse because a nearby shell burst made it unruly: “Don’t whip him, Captain; don’t whip him. I’ve got just such another foolish horse myself, and whipping does no good.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:45 p.m., July 3, to Brigadier General Cadmus Wilcox, who exhibited distress following the repulse: “Never mind, General, all this has been my fault – it is I that have lost this fight, and you must help me out of it the best way you can.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 4:00 p.m., July 3, to Colonel Henry C. Cabell: Cabell approached saying, “These are my guns … we have no infantry support … are we in the right position?” Lee replied in a manner perfectly calm and collected, “Colonel Cabell, the day has gone contrary to our expectations, it is my fault, but the country requires every one now to do all and more than his duty; you are in the right place, hold it.” Bowing to me he rode off to the left. [Henry Coalter Cabell, Family Papers]

About 4:15 p.m., July 3, to men from Ross’ Battery who were cleaning up behind the lines: Lee sent a staff officer to speak with the group, thinking they were stragglers. After being informed otherwise, Lee rode up, saying “I now know who you are and hope there is no offense given.” Lee turned to one man and asked for a drink of water from his canteen; another handed Lee a new tin cup to use. [Felix R. Galloway, Ross’ Battery, Confederate Veteran, August 1913, p. 388]

About 5 p.m., July 3, to Colonel E. P. Alexander and his ordnance officer, Lieutenant Fred Colston, roughly 400 yards west of the Rogers house: A loud cheering arose in the enemy’s lines. Lee turned to Colston and said, “Ride forward and see what that cheering means.” Colston determined it was for a Union General. Lee said to Alexander, “I can understand what they have to cheer for, but I thought it might be my people.” [Frederick W. Colston, John Mercer Garnett Papers]

About 1 a.m., July 4, to Brigadier General John D. Imboden: When Imboden ventured a sympathetic comment to a weary Lee, he replied, “Yes, it has been a sad, sad day to us.” After a minute he said, “I never saw troops behave more magnificently than Pickett’s division of Virginians did today in that grand charge against the enemy. And if they had been supported as they were to have been, but for some reason not yet fully explained to me, were not – we would have held the position and the day would have been ours.” After a moment, he added, “Too bad! Too bad! Oh! Too bad!” Entering his tent, Lee said, “We must now return to Virginia. As many of our poor wounded as possible must be taken home. I have sent for you, because your men and horses are fresh and in good condition, to guard and conduct our train back to Virginia. The duty will be arduous, responsible and dangerous, for I am afraid you will be harassed by the enemy’s cavalry. How many men have you?” When told, Lee continued, “I can spare you as much artillery as you require, but no other troops, as I shall need all I have to return safely by a different and shorter route than yours. The batteries are generally short of ammunition, but you will meet a supply I have ordered from Winchester to Williamsport. Nearly all the transportation and the care of all the wounded will be intrusted to you. You will recross the mountain by the Chambersburg road, and then proceed to Willamsport by any route you deem best, and without a halt till you reach the river. Rest there long enough to feed your animals; then ford the river, and do not halt again till you reach Winchester, where I will again communicate with you.” After further extended discussion, as Imboden was preparing to depart, Lee said in an undertone, “I will place in your hands by a staff officer, tomorrow morning, a sealed package for President Davis, which you will retain in your possession till you are across the Potomac, when you will detail a reliable commissioned officer to take it to Richmond with all possible dispatch and deliver it into the President’s own hands. And I impress upon you that, whatever happens, this package must not fall into the hands of the enemy. If unfortunately you should be captured, destroy it at the first opportunity.” [John D. Imboden, The Confederate Retreat from Gettysburg, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, vol. 3.]

At this hour, around 2 a.m., Lee was remarkably focused for a man of 56 years with a serious health condition who had been actively directing a major battle for at least the past 22 hours.
 
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#2
ee said in an undertone, “I will place in your hands by a staff officer, tomorrow morning, a sealed package for President Davis, which you will retain in your possession till you are across the Potomac, when you will detail a reliable commissioned officer to take it to Richmond with all possible dispatch and deliver it into the President’s own hands.
I have read this quote before, but have never been able to find what was in that letter. Does anyone more learned than I know?
 

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#4
I thought it might be interesting to gather some perhaps lesser known or overlooked examples where participants quote General Robert E. Lee in their recollections of the battle. It provides a unique perspective of Lee in his own words (or rather a close approximation of his words based on the memory of the individual on the receiving end of the conversation). The times listed are approximate. Lee’s words are highlighted in bold; the rest of the conversation is abbreviated, inserted mainly to add context. Personally I most enjoy Lee’s comparatively gentle teaching moments with more junior subordinates, and his equipoise and leadership after the stinging repulse of his attack on July 3.

About 4:20 p.m., July 1, to Lieutenant Colonel John J. Garnett, commanding an artillery battalion: Lee asked if my guns would reach a large body of enemy troops in the distance. Informed they would, Lee said, “They seem to be moving towards the Emmitsburg Road, do they not?” “Place your batteries on Seminary Ridge and either disperse them of develop the purpose of their movement.” [John J. Garnett, Gettysburg: A Complete Historical Narrative of the Battle ...]

About 9 a.m., July 2, to Major William T. Poague, commanding an artillery battalion: Lee called Poague over to ask, “Have you seen General Longstreet or any of his troops anywhere in this neighborhood?” Poague replied he had not. “I wonder where General Longstreet can be?” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 1 p.m., July 2, to Major William T. Poague: “Major, you have sent some rather vague information about a body of troops somewhere. Please tell me all you know about it.” Poague said they appeared to be an infantry column. “What troops are they, the enemy’s or ours?” Poague could not tell. “In what direction are they moving?” Poague could not say. “On what road are they?” Poague did not know. “Well, Major, what do you know?” Poague responded, “Only what I reported.” “It is very important while in enemy’s country that officers obtain all the information possible about the geography of the region and especially about the different roads. This can be gotten by inquiring of the citizens in the neighborhood. Their reports should be as full and definite as can be made.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 11 p.m., July 2, to Lieutenant General A. P. Hill, during a gathering at Lee’s headquarters: General J. E. B. Stuart had arrived, and when Lee heard the voice of A. P. Hill he moved through the crowd, shaking Hill by the hand and said, “It is all well, General, everything is all well.” [William H. Swallow, Early’s Division, Southern Bivouac, vol. IV, June 1885 – May 1886; Reprint, Broadfoot Publishing Company, 1993]

Morning, July 3, to Major George B. Gerald, 18th Mississippi: Lee rode up and asked, “What troops are these and who commands them?” Gerald answered the remnants of Barksdale’s brigade, and he commanded them. Lee pointed to the crest of a hill some 200 yards distant and slightly to the rear and said he was going to place 100 pieces of artillery there and for Gerald to position his men to prevent the artillery from being harassed by Federal infantry. [Judge G. B. Gerald, The Battle of Gettysburg, Waco Daily Times-Herald, July 3, 1913]

About 10 a.m., July 3, to Major James Dearing, commanding an artillery battalion: “My friend! This way is you please.” Dearing approached on horseback. “Ah! Major, excuse me; I thought you might be some countryman who had missed his way. Let me say to you and these young officers, that I am an old reconnoitering officer and have always found it best to go afoot, and not expose oneself needlessly.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:20 p.m., July 3, to Major William T. Poague: “How are you off for ammunition, Major.” Poague reported a dwindling supply but said six howitzers were coming up with full chests. “Ah, that’s well; we may need them.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to soldiers returning from the failed infantry charge: “Men, go to the brook down there and rest and refresh yourselves.” [Gunner with Stonewall, Reminiscences of William Thomas Poague]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to soldiers returning from the failed infantry charge: “All this will come right in the end. We’ll talk it over afterwards; but in the meantime, all good men must rally. We want all good and true men just now.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:30 p.m., July 3, to British Colonel Arthur Fremantle, an observer with the army: “This has been a sad day for us, Colonel – a sad day; but we can’t always expect to gain victories.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:40 p.m., July 3, to a member of his staff who was whipping his horse because a nearby shell burst made it unruly: “Don’t whip him, Captain; don’t whip him. I’ve got just such another foolish horse myself, and whipping does no good.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 3:45 p.m., July 3, to Brigadier General Cadmus Wilcox, who exhibited distress following the repulse: “Never mind, General, all this has been my fault – it is I that have lost this fight, and you must help me out of it the best way you can.” [Col. Arthur Freemantle, Three Months in the Southern States: April-June 1863]

About 4:00 p.m., July 3, to Colonel Henry C. Cabell: Cabell approached saying, “These are my guns … we have no infantry support … are we in the right position?” Lee replied in a manner perfectly calm and collected, “Colonel Cabell, the day has gone contrary to our expectations, it is my fault, but the country requires every one now to do all and more than his duty; you are in the right place, hold it.” Bowing to me he rode off to the left. [Henry Coalter Cabell, Family Papers]

About 4:15 p.m., July 3, to men from Ross’ Battery who were cleaning up behind the lines: Lee sent a staff officer to speak with the group, thinking they were stragglers. After being informed otherwise, Lee rode up, saying “I now know who you are and hope there is no offense given.” Lee turned to one man and asked for a drink of water from his canteen; another handed Lee a new tin cup to use. [Felix R. Galloway, Ross’ Battery, Confederate Veteran, August 1913, p. 388]

About 5 p.m., July 3, to Colonel E. P. Alexander and his ordnance officer, Lieutenant Fred Colston, roughly 400 yards west of the Rogers house: A loud cheering arose in the enemy’s lines. Lee turned to Colston and said, “Ride forward and see what that cheering means.” Colston determined it was for a Union General. Lee said to Alexander, “I can understand what they have to cheer for, but I thought it might be my people.” [Frederick W. Colston, John Mercer Garnett Papers]

About 1 a.m., July 4, to Brigadier General John D. Imboden: When Imboden ventured a sympathetic comment to a weary Lee, he replied, “Yes, it has been a sad, sad day to us.” After a minute he said, “I never saw troops behave more magnificently than Pickett’s division of Virginians did today in that grand charge against the enemy. And if they had been supported as they were to have been, but for some reason not yet fully explained to me, were not – we would have held the position and the day would have been ours.” After a moment, he added, “Too bad! Too bad! Oh! Too bad!” Entering his tent, Lee said, “We must now return to Virginia. As many of our poor wounded as possible must be taken home. I have sent for you, because your men and horses are fresh and in good condition, to guard and conduct our train back to Virginia. The duty will be arduous, responsible and dangerous, for I am afraid you will be harassed by the enemy’s cavalry. How many men have you?” When told, Lee continued, “I can spare you as much artillery as you require, but no other troops, as I shall need all I have to return safely by a different and shorter route than yours. The batteries are generally short of ammunition, but you will meet a supply I have ordered from Winchester to Williamsport. Nearly all the transportation and the care of all the wounded will be intrusted to you. You will recross the mountain by the Chambersburg road, and then proceed to Willamsport by any route you deem best, and without a halt till you reach the river. Rest there long enough to feed your animals; then ford the river, and do not halt again till you reach Winchester, where I will again communicate with you.” After further extended discussion, as Imboden was preparing to depart, Lee said in an undertone, “I will place in your hands by a staff officer, tomorrow morning, a sealed package for President Davis, which you will retain in your possession till you are across the Potomac, when you will detail a reliable commissioned officer to take it to Richmond with all possible dispatch and deliver it into the President’s own hands. And I impress upon you that, whatever happens, this package must not fall into the hands of the enemy. If unfortunately you should be captured, destroy it at the first opportunity.” [John D. Imboden, The Confederate Retreat from Gettysburg, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, vol. 3.]

At this hour, around 2 a.m., Lee was remarkably focused for a man of 56 years with a serious health condition who had been actively directing a major battle for at least the past 22 hours.
Great list of quotes Tom! The quote to Imboden I find particularly fascinating. Imboden was tasked with an extremely dangerous assignment. A very long and arduous journey. To be honest, I find it one of the true wonders of the war that he made it. A detailed narrative of his journey would make for a very interesting thread.
I have read this quote before, but have never been able to find what was in that letter. Does anyone more learned than I know?
In a letter writing July 8, 1863, Robert E. Lee explains his current position during the Confederate Army's retreat from Gettysburg.
His Excellency Jefferson Davis
President Confederate States
Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia near Hagerstown, Md, July 8, 1863.
Mr. President,
My letter of yesterday should have informed you of the position of this army. Though reduced in numbers by the hardships and battles through which it has passed since leaving the Rappahannock its condition is good and its confidence unimpaired.
When crossing the Potomac into Maryland, I had calculated upon the river remaining fordable during the summer, so as to enable me to recross at my pleasure, but a series of storms commencing the day after our entrance into Maryland has placed the river beyond fording stage and the present storms will keep it so for at least a week.
I shall therefore have to accept battle if the enemy offers it, whether I wish to or not, and as the result is in the hands of the Sovereign Ruler of the universe and known to him only, I deem it prudent to make every arrangement in our power to meet any emergency that may arrive.
From information gathered from the papers I believe that the troops from the North Carolina and the coast of Virginia, under Generals Foster and Day have been ordered to the Potomac and that recently additional reinforcements have been sent from the coast of South Carolina to General Banks. If I am correct in my opinion this will liberate most of the troops in those regions and should not your Excellency have already done so I earnestly recommend that all that can be spared be concentrated on the upper Rappahannock under General Beauregard with directions to cross the river and make demonstration upon Washington.
This course will answer the double purpose of affording protection to the capital at Richmond and relieving the pressure upon this army. I hope your Excellency will understand that I am not in the least discouraged or that my faith in the protection of an All merciful Providence, or in the fortitude of this army is at all shaken. But though conscious that the enemy has been much shattered in the recent battle I am aware that he can be easily reinforced while no addition can be made to our numbers. The measure therefore that I have recommended is altogether one of a prudential nature.
I am most respectfully your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General
 

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I have read this quote before, but have never been able to find what was in that letter. Does anyone more learned than I know?
Interestingly. I’ve found that quote practically word for word in Sears. I’ve also found it in John D. Imboden’s retreat from Gettysburg. One mentions a private message from Lee to Davis (Imboden) Sears makes no reference to it. Also Lee’s correspondence of the 8th mentions an earlier message from the 7th. I am unable to fine either message. It will be interesting to see if anyone here has them. That’s a great question @Mark Roth
 

E_just_E

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#7
Great stuff. Bit of nitpicking:

About 4:20 p.m., July 1, to Lieutenant Colonel John J. Garnett, commanding an artillery battalion: Lee asked if my guns would reach a large body of enemy troops in the distance. Informed they would, Lee said, “They seem to be moving towards the Emmitsburg Road, do they not?” “Place your batteries on Seminary Ridge and either disperse them of develop the purpose of their movement.” [John J. Garnett, Gettysburg: A Complete Historical Narrative of the Battle ...]
This is likely a paraphrase, and not a quote. Why? It is highly unlikely that Lee would call Seminary Ridge with that name back then. He most likely pointed at it, if that even happened.

Why? At around 4:20 Lee was probably in the vicinity of Lee's HQs/McPherson Ridge, if not still at Herr's Ridge. There is no practical way from either of those points to know whether the Union army that was retreating, going towards Emmittsburg Rd, Baltimore Pk, or Taneytown Rd., or even, unless Lee knew Avery's & Hays's brigade positions, even York or Hanover Rds. You just cannot see Emmittsburg Road from there :wink:
 
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Great stuff. Bit of nitpicking:



This is likely a paraphrase, and not a quote. Why? It is highly unlikely that Lee would call Seminary Ridge with that name back then. He most likely pointed at it, if that even happened.

Why? At around 4:20 Lee was probably in the vicinity of Lee's HQs/McPherson Ridge, if not still at Herr's Ridge. There is no practical way from either of those points to know whether the Union army that was retreating at that point, was going towards Emmittsburg Rd, Baltimore Pk, or Taneytown Rd., or even, unless Lee knew Avery's & Hays's brigade positions, even York or Hanover Rds. You just cannot see Emmittsburg Road from there :wink:
Why? It is highly unlikely that Lee would call Seminary Ridge with that name back then. He most likely pointed at it, if that even happened.

Funny, I thought the same thing.
 

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The mystery thickens. I’ve had time to search Freeman, Burke Davis, Korda and Sears and can find no reference to the package given to Imboden or Lee’s correspondence to Davis of July, 7th. Vertically all mention Lee’s corrospondence of the 8th. Since Lee mentions the corrospondence of the 7th himself, I would suspect this corrospondence has been lost. The package mentioned in Imboden’s account is either lost or questionable. Does anyone have access to the official records? Both corrospondences should be recorded there.
 

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#10
The mystery thickens. I’ve had time to search Freeman, Burke Davis, Korda and Sears and can find no reference to the package given to Imboden or Lee’s correspondence to Davis of July, 7th. Vertically all mention Lee’s corrospondence of the 8th. Since Lee mentions the corrospondence of the 7th himself, I would suspect this corrospondence has been lost. The package mentioned in Imboden’s account is either lost or questionable. Does anyone have access to the official records? Both corrospondences should be recorded there.
I'm not too familiar with Imboden but he seems reliable enough, not given to additions like some folks who have related things about Lee. I've seen it in several books on Gettysburg by authors who check what they say, but then sometimes things get copied without question. Just can't imagine what sensitive item Lee would be sending to Davis at that point!
 

diane

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#11
At this hour, around 2 a.m., Lee was remarkably focused for a man of 56 years with a serious health condition who had been actively directing a major battle for at least the past 22 hours.
That's a key observation! A lot has been said about Lee's health and his state of mind during Gettysburg - these conversations sound like he was doing well and was clear headed. Kind of makes one reconsider what one thinks one knows!
 

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I'm not too familiar with Imboden but he seems reliable enough, not given to additions like some folks who have related things about Lee. I've seen it in several books on Gettysburg by authors who check what they say, but then sometimes things get copied without question. Just can't imagine what sensitive item Lee would be sending to Davis at that point!
A very good point. I have no reason to question Imboden either. However, the package sounds to be of importance. That’s why I referred to several Lee biographers and was surprised to find none of them even reference it. I dying to know more.
 

Tom Elmore

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#13
Great stuff. Bit of nitpicking:



This is likely a paraphrase, and not a quote. Why? It is highly unlikely that Lee would call Seminary Ridge with that name back then. He most likely pointed at it, if that even happened.

Why? At around 4:20 Lee was probably in the vicinity of Lee's HQs/McPherson Ridge, if not still at Herr's Ridge. There is no practical way from either of those points to know whether the Union army that was retreating at that point, was going towards Emmittsburg Rd, Baltimore Pk, or Taneytown Rd., or even, unless Lee knew Avery's & Hays's brigade positions, even York or Hanover Rds. You just cannot see Emmittsburg Road from there :wink:
Good point, although it was a ridge, and there was a prominent Seminary on it. You may choose a later time, but Lee was on Seminary Ridge not long after the Federals had been cleared off of it, and the enemy troops he saw must have been those in full retreat beyond the south edge of the town. I doubt it was later than 5 p.m. By my calculations, the First Corps broke at 4 p.m. and they only had to travel one mile to reach the southern edge of the town - the Eleventh Corps had a head start on them.
 
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E_just_E

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#14
Good point, although it was a ridge, and there was a prominent Seminary on it.
Well, JJ Garnett kinda contradicts himself here.

OR August 2, 1863, JJ Garnett's report:

About 11 a.m. on the morning of July 1, I received orders to bring up my command to within supporting distance on the Gettysburg pike, which I reached after the battle had been in progress for several hours. On reaching the scene of action, as directed, I halted my battalion in column on the side of the road, and awaited further orders. After a delay of about an hour, I received a message from Major Pegram, requesting that I relieve one of his batteries, whose ammunition had become exhausted. I accordingly sent him Capt. V. Maurin, of the Donaldsonville Battery, with six of my rifled pieces, which almost immediately opened upon the enemy and with apparent effect. These pieces kept up a slow and steady fire for about an hour, when, the enemy having been forced back out of range to the position held by them on the second and third days, together with the other pieces of the command, they were advanced to the front, in the rear of the line of battle nearly opposite Cemetery Hill, where they remained in park until the following morning, protected from the enemy's fire by a high hill.

I know that lots of people went on to write that they really have conversed with General Lee at their memoirs, but...

No General Lee ordering him in the OR, no ridge, but a position protected by a "hill" that they took in the request of Maj. Pegram and kept for 3 days...

His report one month after the battle seems more likely to be the truth vs his memoirs published 25 years after the fact (1888) and just 14 years before taking his own life due to mental illness...

Frankly, I have a hard time believe most of the things written about Gettysburg after 1868, and a lot of the things that were written before...
 



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