Frederick Douglass Editorial Regarding R. E. Lee's Death

#1

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,371
Location
Long Island, NY
#2
During January 1870 Frederick Douglass began publishing his latest newspaper the New National Era out of Uniontown in Washington D. C. On November 10, 1870, Douglass published the following editorial titled "Bombast," critical of the adulation of being heaped on Robert E. Lee as a result of his recent death.

View attachment 273892

New National Era Newspaper, November 10, 1870

https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/...eries&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1
Thanks for adding this. The question of Civil War memory was alive from the first days of the peace.
 

ebg12

Corporal
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
444
#3
Frederick Douglass is exactly right!
Great editorial!
Frederick Douglass speaks the truth about a man (Lee) that fought so hard for slavery.
As Frederick Douglass said: " I will always remember those who fought for liberty, and those who fought for slavery."
There is no greater icon than Lee that represents "those who fought for slavery", and that is how Lee will be remembered!
 

63rdOVI

Corporal
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
414
Location
Houston, Texas
#4
I will never forget Douglass's words on the occasion of a Decoration Day in 1871:

"I am no minister of malice. I would not strike the fallen. I would not repel the repentant; but may my "right hand forget her cunning and my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth," if I forget the difference between the parties to that terrible, protracted, and bloody conflict."

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895). Address at the Graves of the Unknown Dead at Arlington, Virginia, May 30, 1871.
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,371
Location
Long Island, NY
#5
I will never forget Douglass's words on the occasion of a Decoration Day in 1871:

"I am no minister of malice. I would not strike the fallen. I would not repel the repentant; but may my "right hand forget her cunning and my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth," if I forget the difference between the parties to that terrible, protracted, and bloody conflict."

Frederick Douglass (1818–1895). Address at the Graves of the Unknown Dead at Arlington, Virginia, May 30, 1871.
Good quote
 



Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top