Enfield Pattern 1853 Markings?


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Craig L Barry

Sergeant Major
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#10
Hard to say definitively but often the letter and number on the butt plate tang is the unit & company. Clearly stamped not etched in or engraved, too. Repair to the toe of stock is crude, not likely to be something done by an arsenal during the war and could have been any time in the life of the rifle post-bellum. Otherwise looks like a run of the mill Union contract P53 with likely early war provenance.
 
Joined
May 15, 2016
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#11
Thanks everyone. I'm feeling better about it most likely being an ACW weapon with likely USA early war provenance. Too bad I could not get more info from the gun broker.
I'm keeping this one to hand down to the kids, but any idea how much it is worth? I'd say 50/50 chance I'll get it shootable again. Smithy will tell soon. Rifling is probably shot.
 
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#14
Thanks everyone. I'm feeling better about it most likely being an ACW weapon with likely USA early war provenance. Too bad I could not get more info from the gun broker.
I'm keeping this one to hand down to the kids, but any idea how much it is worth? I'd say 50/50 chance I'll get it shootable again. Smithy will tell soon. Rifling is probably shot.
A lot of them the rifling is worn out it they have very shallow rifling.
 
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#15
I really doubt I'd ever try shooting it even if the smith gives the all clear. Just would be nice to know it's possible. A good oil cleaning is all I'll give it unless anyone has suggestions or cautions. Never dealt with metal this old myself.
Oh and forgot to mention I paid $700 in Oregon for it. Happy with that.
 
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#16
I really doubt I'd ever try shooting it even if the smith gives the all clear. Just would be nice to know it's possible. A good oil cleaning is all I'll give it unless anyone has suggestions or cautions. Never dealt with metal this old myself.
Oh and forgot to mention I paid $700 in Oregon for it. Happy with that.
$700 You did ok it looks to be in reasonably good shape. Give the bore a good cleaning, a good gun oil on the metal to get rid of any obvious rust don't use anything but oil and a rag on the exterior metal, and maybe a few drops of linseed oil rubbed into the wood.
 
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#17
Just picked up this Enfield in Portland OR and am wondering if any of y'all can tell me anything about it? It came with no documentation or provenance. Looks to be a repair job done on the underside of the stock - butt with dowels securing a long piece on. The attached piece has a king&phillips engraving on the underside (an enfield assembly factory out of Bath, England I've read online) so if not the original piece it would have been pulled from an original. I'm thinking maybe field repair? There is no blockade stamp so if civil war used would likely have been confederate? There is one undersized rifle ring (closest to the lock) and a snapped sight at the swivel joint. Only Marking I have no clue about are the E5 on the underside of the butt plate and the very small V&S (possibly W&S) on the sight. The E5 is where inventory numbers usually were placed but i've no clue as to meaning. The bore is pretty dirty/corroded maybe, but I'm going to see what I can do about that. I can't seem to see any rifling but that might be due to buildup in bore. I have not yet disassembled.
Anything anyone can tell from the pics that I didn't include in this post?
Much appreciated.
There are additional markings that should be on the piece, take the barrel off and check the underside for the barrel manufacturer, in addition to the inside ramrod channel and report back markings found. King & Phillips have been found on Confederate imported Birmingham muskets in both calibers. I would also check flat opposite the lock for any type of cartouche, in addition to the underside around the buttplate and trigger guard for markings, in the wood. Based upon the condition of the wood it may be very hard to discern. The E5 is most likely a soldier's rack number

This is most likely an early war Union import, but one never knows, additional inspection should give up some answers.
 

MRB1863

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#18
In the condition its in $6 - $800 give or take a $100 . I would hang it up and not risk damaging or breaking something shooting it. It appears to be all original you need to keep it that way .
Agree 100%!!! And it is a nice find to proudly display with any collection.

Hint: my birthday is in October! Just sayin'...
 
Joined
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#19
There are additional markings that should be on the piece, take the barrel off and check the underside for the barrel manufacturer, in addition to the inside ramrod channel and report back markings found. King & Phillips have been found on Confederate imported Birmingham muskets in both calibers. I would also check flat opposite the lock for any type of cartouche, in addition to the underside around the buttplate and trigger guard for markings, in the wood. Based upon the condition of the wood it may be very hard to discern. The E5 is most likely a soldier's rack number

This is most likely an early war Union import, but one never knows, additional inspection should give up some answers.
Thanks for the tips. No sign of a cartouche unfortunatly. I hope to have the time this weekend to carefully disassemble and "clean". Will take pics of anything I find and report back.

Question: how should a deal with any stuck screws/threading I will likely come across? I would typically lube-up with wd40 and let sit for a bit if this was not an antique. I understand it's a no no on a piece like this. Suggestions?
 
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#20
Thanks for the tips. No sign of a cartouche unfortunatly. I hope to have the time this weekend to carefully disassemble and "clean". Will take pics of anything I find and report back.

Question: how should a deal with any stuck screws/threading I will likely come across? I would typically lube-up with wd40 and let sit for a bit if this was not an antique. I understand it's a no no on a piece like this. Suggestions?
I always make sure that the blade of the screwdriver fits securely as not to bugger the face/slot of the screw, I'll even wrap the blade head in cloth. I would test the screws first and if no movement then some WD will not hurt, be careful to wipe the excess from the piece.

You definitely have a piece that was made for export and most likely saw service in the US. Good luck!
 



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