Period Dutch Flummery

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Anna Elizabeth Henry

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From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management - this would make an interesting summer dessert I think. It reminds me of a cross between a custard and jello as it's set in a mold.

upload_2017-7-6_13-46-40.png

Here's a modern day photo of the dessert -

256px-Flum1.jpg
Flum1
Jrej09 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


And to those wondering what isinglass is - well it's a compound made from the stomach or bladder of sturgeons and used as a stiffening agent :sick: But never fear we have a safe modern equivalent with powdered gelatin.
 
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WJC

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From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management - this would make an interesting summer dessert I think. It reminds me of a cross between a custard and jello as it's set in a mold.

View attachment 147335

Here's a modern day photo of the dessert -

View attachment 147341

And to those wondering what isinglass is - well it's a compound made from the stomach or bladder of sturgeons and used as a stiffening agent :sick: But never fear we have a safe modern equivalent with powdered gelatin.
Thanks for posting! Looks good to me!
What's the origin of the name?
 
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From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management - this would make an interesting summer dessert I think. It reminds me of a cross between a custard and jello as it's set in a mold.

View attachment 147335

Here's a modern day photo of the dessert -

View attachment 147341

And to those wondering what isinglass is - well it's a compound made from the stomach or bladder of sturgeons and used as a stiffening agent :sick: But never fear we have a safe modern equivalent with powdered gelatin.
From reading the recipe it seems to be just sherry flavored jello. The beige color comes from the sturgeon and the sherry.
 
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Anna Elizabeth Henry

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Thanks for posting! Looks good to me!
What's the origin of the name?
I did some quick research about Flummery and it's actually quite an old dessert as it first appears in the English Huswife from 1623! As to the origin of the word flummery here's an excerpt from Wikipedia -

The name is derived from the Welsh word for a similar dish made from sour oatmeal and husks, llymru, which itself is of unknown origin. It is also attested in variant forms such as thlummery or flamery in 17th and 18th century English. The word "flummery" later came to have generally pejorative connotations of a bland, empty, and unsatisfying food; from this use, "flummery" developed the meaning of empty compliments, unsubstantial talk or writing, and nonsense.
 

nitrofd

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From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management - this would make an interesting summer dessert I think. It reminds me of a cross between a custard and jello as it's set in a mold.

View attachment 147335

Here's a modern day photo of the dessert -

View attachment 147341

And to those wondering what isinglass is - well it's a compound made from the stomach or bladder of sturgeons and used as a stiffening agent :sick: But never fear we have a safe modern equivalent with powdered gelatin.
That is indeed interesting.have never seen one nor have I heard of it,but I would sure give it a go.
 

nitrofd

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I did some quick research about Flummery and it's actually quite an old dessert as it first appears in the English Huswife from 1623! As to the origin of the word flummery here's an excerpt from Wikipedia -

The name is derived from the Welsh word for a similar dish made from sour oatmeal and husks, llymru, which itself is of unknown origin. It is also attested in variant forms such as thlummery or flamery in 17th and 18th century English. The word "flummery" later came to have generally pejorative connotations of a bland, empty, and unsatisfying food; from this use, "flummery" developed the meaning of empty compliments, unsubstantial talk or writing, and nonsense.
From the guys on the random thoughts thread hears something from one of our Welsh members we have no idea what he is talking about,he has to translate.
He did say something very interesting the other day that a Regiment of Welsh Fulsilleers fought with the Americans against the British during the Revolution.they loved the english.
 
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WJC

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I did some quick research about Flummery and it's actually quite an old dessert as it first appears in the English Huswife from 1623! As to the origin of the word flummery here's an excerpt from Wikipedia -

The name is derived from the Welsh word for a similar dish made from sour oatmeal and husks, llymru, which itself is of unknown origin. It is also attested in variant forms such as thlummery or flamery in 17th and 18th century English. The word "flummery" later came to have generally pejorative connotations of a bland, empty, and unsatisfying food; from this use, "flummery" developed the meaning of empty compliments, unsubstantial talk or writing, and nonsense.
Thanks for your response!
"Dutch Flummery". Who knew? Anyway, it looks delicious! Diolch!
 
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