CSS Mobile Ironclad

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
As a civilian employee of the CSN I don't think Porter had the authority to order Mobile up-river. The senior officer at New Orleans certainly had the authority - Whittle?
If you are referring to the Mobile's move from Berwick Bay to the Yazoo, when RebelatSea said:"All we know is that she was ordered to Yazoo City (by whom, Porter ?) to be converted to a 2 gun casemate ironclad."

Then I have to inform you that is simply wrong. The Mobile went to the Yazoo for exactly the same reasons as the Livingston, St. Philip, Polk, St. Mary's, Van Dorn, and the Ivy. That is to escape the immediate destruction or capture by the US Navy fleets ascending and descending the Mississippi River. The Maurepas and Pontchartrain took refuge in the rivers of Arkansas for exactly the same reason. This movement, especially for the vessels fleeing New Orleans, was hurried, impromptu, and in some ways improvised "on the spot."
Long range plans for these vessels, other than that they should defend the tributaries of the Mississippi on which they took refuge and that they should not be surrendered or captured, simply did not yet exist.

If there is any evidence, I repeat evidence, that the Mobile was ordered to Yazoo City for the purpose of being converted to a casemate ironclad please share it, with documentation of the source.
 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
I was born and raised in Jackson.

I do know the distance between these locations.
A 10 mile difference was not much of an issue during the 1860s.

However, I do thank you for providing the exact geographic coordinates of those sites

You just plotted the Central Business District of Bovina.
Jackson is about 50 miles south and a little east of Yazoo City.
Your sarcasm does not cover up or excuse your erroneous statement.
It you don't want to be corrected, don't make make mistakes.

Also, I think whether a soldier was marching or riding on a slow railroad car in the 1860's, 10 miles would make a considerable difference. It may not make difference to someone going 65 mph in a comfotable velicle in 2021.
 

Crossroads

Private
Joined
Jan 2, 2021
Thank you.

I really need to order your book !

A few years ago, I came across the reported location of the HQ office of the CSA Navy in Mississippi.

The office seems to have been across the street from our original capitol.
(about 40 miles Southwest of Yazoo City).

Anyway, Jackson was burned three times by the Union within two years, so I'm sure those official records of the Western CSN operations are forever lost.

I do have hope there may be some records of the Western CSN that still may exist "undiscovered" .
Can you tell me (or us) any details about the reported location of this office?
A more specific location?
The source where you found this information?
Thanks for your assistance
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Yes that's a very small mistake of mine. mea culpa.
Can you own up to mixing up east and west and shortening the distance between Yazoo City and Jackson by 10 miles?
Nope.

I haven't mixed up East or West at all.

Moreover, the distance between any given location within most Western Campaigns were never 100 % accurate, especially with the Union maps that are the most common in today's publications.

I will say that I am impressed with your knowledge of Central Mississippi.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Can you tell me (or us) any details about the reported location of this office?
A more specific location?
The source where you found this information?
Thanks for your assistance
From what I recall, the CSN office was upstairs in a building at the intersection of Capitol Street and at what is now North State Street.
During the 1860's, North State street was the "Canton Road".

The source is from papers of the day (I subscribe to newspapers.com).

I believe it was also mentioned in Myron Smith's book about the CSS Arkansas and
Grabau's work: Ninety-Eight Days.

 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
If you are referring to the Mobile's move from Berwick Bay to the Yazoo, when RebelatSea said:"All we know is that she was ordered to Yazoo City (by whom, Porter ?) to be converted to a 2 gun casemate ironclad."

Then I have to inform you that is simply wrong. The Mobile went to the Yazoo for exactly the same reasons as the Livingston, St. Philip, Polk, St. Mary's, Van Dorn, and the Ivy. That is to escape the immediate destruction or capture by the US Navy fleets ascending and descending the Mississippi River. The Maurepas and Pontchartrain took refuge in the rivers of Arkansas for exactly the same reason. This movement, especially for the vessels fleeing New Orleans, was hurried, impromptu, and in some ways improvised "on the spot."
Long range plans for these vessels, other than that they should defend the tributaries of the Mississippi on which they took refuge and that they should not be surrendered or captured, simply did not yet exist.

If there is any evidence, I repeat evidence, that the Mobile was ordered to Yazoo City for the purpose of being converted to a casemate ironclad please share it, with documentation of the source.
And I have to inform you that it is simply RIGHT.
Evidence:
Professor William N. Still Jr : Iron Afloat p139. "Mallory, aware of the seriousness of the situation, assured Secretary Of War George W. Randolph and others that immediate steps were being taken to construct additional ironclads in the west. Even before the Arkansas was destroyed the wooden gunboat Mobile had been ordered to Yazoo City for conversion to an armorclad"
His source is ORNs Ser. 1 XIX 788-9: Mallory to J.D.B De Bow, August 19 1862, from the J.D. De Bow Papers (Duke University Durham ).
 

Ptarmigan

Private
Joined
Jul 21, 2013
You are both correct as your assertions are saying different things. Mobile was sent North in May of 1862 to avoid capture following the fall of New Orleans and while she was at Yazoo she was selected for conversion into an ironclad three to four months later.
 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
From what I recall, the CSN office was upstairs in a building at the intersection of Capitol Street and at what is now North State Street.
During the 1860's, North State street was the "Canton Road".

The source is from papers of the day (I subscribe to newspapers.com).

I believe it was also mentioned in Myron Smith's book about the CSS Arkansas and
Grabau's work: Ninety-Eight Days.

Thanks
 

Crossroads

Private
Joined
Jan 2, 2021
Thank you for understanding the reality of the situat
From what I recall, the CSN office was upstairs in a building at the intersection of Capitol Street and at what is now North State Street.
During the 1860's, North State street was the "Canton Road".

The source is from papers of the day (I subscribe to newspapers.com).

I believe it was also mentioned in Myron Smith's book about the CSS Arkansas and
Grabau's work: Ninety-Eight Days.

Good info, I appreciate your posting it.
 
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