Cotton Statistics

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byron ed

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Just a step back to basics for Antebellum context: Long-staple cotton was the kind of cotton that had always been used for the cotton industry in the south, family plantations with lifelong associations with their negro chattel and their families. This cotton could not grow in a variety of climates like the newly discovered short-staple cotton. Long-staple cotton was to be replaced by the more durable and prosperous short-staple cotton as machinery to process the latter more efficiently became available: the cotton gin.

The cotton gin in effect enabled a huge expansion of cotton agriculture into vaster upland areas of the South, in turn driving demand for more slaves, in turn driving values of slaves up, in turn driving more slave family separations and harsher treatment of individual slaves whose new masters treated them more as a commodity than a beloved family slave, thus more harshly.
 
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O' Be Joyful

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Me: I can believe that too. No mechanical pickers at that time.

1950 there were mechanical pickers for cotton, however the machines would not only "pick the cotton", but they would pick the stems and everything else that needed to be separated from the cotton later. Only after 1950 were they able to
manufacture machines that would "pick the cotton and everything else, and then mechanically separate the unwanted material. That is why still by 1950 75% of the cotton grown was still picked by hands because machinery was inefficient

As further info:

https://eh.net/encyclopedia/mechanical-cotton-picker/
 
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Drew

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From your article:

Cotton Harvester Sweepstakes

International Harvester


"Major farm implement companies, which had far more resources than did the Rust brothers, entered what may be called the cotton harvester sweepstakes. Usually avoiding publicity, implement companies were happy to let the Rust brothers bear the brunt of popular criticism. International Harvester (IH) of Chicago, Illinois, had invented the popular Farmall tractor in 1924 and then experimented with pneumatic pickers. After three years of work, Harvester realized that a skilled hand picker could easily pick faster than their pneumatic machine."

To set the record strait, International Harvester was (and is) the legacy company of the McCormick Harvesting Company. Cyrus McCormick, a Virginian, invented the original grain harvester, with the help of a McCormick family slave, according to legend. The name change to International Harvester was a McCormick family decision in the early 20th century, at which time Cyrus' heirs still controlled the company.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Cyrus-McCormick

Now, back to "high brow" discussion of the cotton trade.
 

O' Be Joyful

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To set the record strait, International Harvester was (and is) the legacy company of the McCormick Harvesting Company. Cyrus McCormick, a Virginian, invented the original grain harvester, with the help of a McCormick family slave, according to legend. The name change to International Harvester was a McCormick family decision in the early 20th century, at which time Cyrus' heirs still controlled the company.
Thanks for that correction Drew. As someone whom used a couple of Farmall tractors--and several other "colors"--as a lad, I am always interested in their history.

Have you considered contacting the Economic History Association http://eh.net/eha/ so they may possibly correct that grievous and seemingly history changing mistake? I am certain they would appreciate it.

Other than that, are there any other errors that you believe would refute the substance of my linked article?

Edit: for syntax
 
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Norm53

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Just one example from this site:

"The application of these biotechnology techniques to produce genetically engineered (GE) cotton plants started about two decades ago, and the first GE cotton was planted on a commercial scale in 1996/97 in Australia and the USA. Currently, two types of genetically engineered cottons are available for commercial cultivation, cotton resistant to bollworms, know as Bt cotton, and herbicide-tolerant cotton. Since its introduction in 1996, GE cotton has been one of the most rapidly adopted technologies ever. An estimated 12% of world cotton area was planted to genetically engineered cotton in 1999/2000 in Argentina, Australia, China (Mainland), Mexico, South Africa and the USA."

http://www.cotton.org/tech/biotech/Expert-Panel-Biotech-Cotton.cfm

Norm
 

Drew

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Thanks for that correction Drew. As someone whom used a couple of Farmall tractors--and several other "colors"--as a lad, I am always interested in their history.

Have you considered contacting the Economic History Association http://eh.net/eha/ so they may possibly correct that grievous and seemingly history changing mistake? I am certain they would appreciate it.

Other than that, are there any other errors that you believe would refute the substance of my linked article?

Edit: for syntax
No, I won't be arguing with a website and no, there are no more errors in your linked article. Just setting the record straight with respect to IH.

Carry on.
 
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Drew

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Interesting Source
link
Production and price of cotton for one hundred years
by Watkins, James L. (James Lawrence), b. 1850 Publication date 1895


Well if you insist

View attachment 297568
View attachment 297569
OK, it looks to me like the "average price" at New York fell for years after the war. Of course, one would have to consider production costs as well.

"Sharecropping," in the absence of slave labor, would certainly have had an impact. I'll look at this in a future post.
 

jgoodguy

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OK, it looks to me like the "average price" at New York fell for years after the war. Of course, one would have to consider production costs as well.

"Sharecropping," in the absence of slave labor, would certainly have had an impact. I'll look at this in a future post.
I'll look too.
 

USS ALASKA

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Oddly, though, in Albion's book, The Rise of New York Port, which I read long ago, he claims that the canal did not appreciably impact the port; that it was already mighty because of other factors. I find that hard to believe, but I never took the time to refute it.
Sir, reading this and doing some research, I can buy this at face value. The Erie Canal added to an already exploding NYC metropolitan area. Perhaps the greatest impact wasn't to NYC but that it took all this additional commerce away from any 'runners up' and denied them the opportunity to play 'catch-up'. Philly, and more distantly Bal'mer, specifically.
742

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 
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Norm53

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Sir, reading this and doing some research, I can buy this at face value. The Erie Canal added to an already exploding NYC metropolitan area. Perhaps the greatest impact wasn't to NYC but that it took all this additional commerce away from any 'runners up' and denied them the opportunity to play 'catch-up'. Philly, and more distantly Bal'mer, specifically.
742

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
Thanks. I grew up across the street from the Erie Barge Canal, played in the culverts under it, watched barges moving along it, and worked and lived on it as a dredger deckhand during the summer while in college, so I had personal reasons for being interested. Studied Noble Whitford's 3 huge tomes, researched it and the lateral canals connected the Erie, studied it in its museums, especially the big one in Syracuse. The canal comprised a few hundred pages at my website, which I wrote in hand-HTML. The site itself contained about 13,000 pages in total, which I gave to my home town because it contained lots of local info and photos that interested them.
 
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