Confederate blankets

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Early in the war thousands of blankets for the Confederacy were made in Richmond. Soon most Confederate soldiers used captured blankets or civilian blankets. From June 1863 until late in the war hundreds of thousand of blankets ran through the blockade. By the end of the war gray of blue British made blankets would have been common in the Confederate Army.
 

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http://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/96EA0A1C-221E-4374-BC12-415011871028

Blanket of blue wool, 2/2 twill with 3" W green-brown stripes approximately 4.5" from the edge. "N.C." stitched in red wool in center; 4" letter height.

This is a blanket used by Captain John Stark Ravenscroft Miller, Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. Captain Miller was killed in the second battle of Winchester, June 15, 1863.

On June 10, 1863, as the Army of Northern Virginia again prepared to move northward, Miller outlined his prospects for the upcoming campaign in a letter to his mother: “I scarcely think we will have a general engagement as the Yanks are disposed to play ‘shy’ as they have been so roughly handled that they can scarcely make up their minds and when they do they soon become [so] terror stricken that they show no courage or determination . . . Our troops are so accustomed to victory that it would be impossible to whip them. You need have no uneasiness about us at home as we are perfectly confident and with Lee to guide us are certain of success.” Five days later, Captain John S. R. Miller was killed at the Battle of Stephenson’s Depot, VA, as part of the Second Battle of Winchester, while pursuing General Robert Milroy’s fleeing Federals down the Shenandoah Valley.

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http://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/4769CD81-DDE3-4EF8-A04E-115869219404

Blanket of butternut wool with two wide bands of red and green warp threads in parallel lines.

The blanket was owned and used by Corporal Thomas Vaden Brooke, a member of the 3rd Company Richmond Howitzers. He was issued the blanket during the winter of 1862-1863, while the Howitzers were in Winter quarters at Bowling Green, Caroline County, Virginia.

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http://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/C29533AB-9DAC-49A7-A92E-504717879704

Waterproof ground cloth of canvas with felted reverse and remains of paint or wax waterproofing on obverse side; 3/4 inch hem on one side with three bone four-hole buttons; wriiten in ink on obverse side "Poague".

A portion of the blanket was used by James Wilson Poague, Co. C, 1st Virginia Cavalry, Rockingbridge County, Va. It was made from a piano cover. Poague was mortally wounded in action at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May 7, 1864 and died May 26, 1864.

Old label attached to obverse side: "Portion of Army Blanket (made from a piano cover) used from March, 1862 to May, 1864, by James Wilson Poague, private in Co. C, 1st Va. Cavalry".
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http://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/D93A2508-506E-4715-A04B-332855560770

Blanket of white woolen warp and cadet gray woolen weft, with a black stripe at each end, one inch wide. An inscription is embroidered in red: "This Blanket was Providentially placed in my hands on 5th April 1865 the 2nd day after / I was made a prisoner of war on Lee's Retreat. Imprisoned at Pt. Lookout Md., Released 21st / June 1865 / Thos. G. Penn, Co. G Capt. M.S. Kirtly 10th Va. Cav. / Col. R.A. Caskie Command'g / Chambabliss' Brig. / W.H.F. Lee's Division / Hamptons Corps…"

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http://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/96EA0A1C-221E-4374-BC12-415011871028

Blanket of blue wool, 2/2 twill with 3" W green-brown stripes approximately 4.5" from the edge. "N.C." stitched in red wool in center; 4" letter height.

This is a blanket used by Captain John Stark Ravenscroft Miller, Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. Captain Miller was killed in the second battle of Winchester, June 15, 1863.

On June 10, 1863, as the Army of Northern Virginia again prepared to move northward, Miller outlined his prospects for the upcoming campaign in a letter to his mother: “I scarcely think we will have a general engagement as the Yanks are disposed to play ‘shy’ as they have been so roughly handled that they can scarcely make up their minds and when they do they soon become [so] terror stricken that they show no courage or determination . . . Our troops are so accustomed to victory that it would be impossible to whip them. You need have no uneasiness about us at home as we are perfectly confident and with Lee to guide us are certain of success.” Five days later, Captain John S. R. Miller was killed at the Battle of Stephenson’s Depot, VA, as part of the Second Battle of Winchester, while pursuing General Robert Milroy’s fleeing Federals down the Shenandoah Valley.

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Do we know if this blanket is one of the British made blankets obtained by North Carolina?
 
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Do we know if this blanket is one of the British made blankets obtained by North Carolina?
Blankets were always in short supply and according to the "English Connection" were included in virtually every blockade run. They differed in color drastically and were imported during all 4 years of the war; unfortunately no detailed specification has yet to surface. Among colors listed in manifests were, grey (seem to be the majority), blue grey, super blue grey, butternut, white and super white hospital. In most cases the final recipient was not listed. Blankets seized by prize courts were usually re-issued to Federal troops, though some were auctioned off. Despite the large number of blankets imported, there are relatively few known and identifiable specimens.
 
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