Books You Have Reread

matthew mckeon

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"YOU SHALL NOT PASS!" I re-read Lord of the Rings every few years. As far as military books I like John Kegan's A History of Warfare.
I have over 1000 books in my reading room and I have given twice that number away. I just cannot throw away a book. It would be blasphemy!
Just reread the first book, Fellowship of the Ring. I donate books to the public library booksale every year.
 

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juliew

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I taught fifth grade for many years, and the Social Studies curriculum deals with American History. When I taught about the Civil War, I would always read Gary Paulsen's "Soldier's Heart." A very moving and powerful story aimed at the upper elementary grades. I've must have read it a dozen or more times. Still enjoy it.
 

Norm53

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I taught fifth grade for many years, and the Social Studies curriculum deals with American History. When I taught about the Civil War, I would always read Gary Paulsen's "Soldier's Heart." A very moving and powerful story aimed at the upper elementary grades. I've must have read it a dozen or more times. Still enjoy it.
Many readers agreed with your choice. How was he able to enlist at 15?
 

James N.

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I've reread very little over the years - there's always too much unread to ever go back! Having said that, there have been a (very) few: The Desert Fox,The Killer Angels, Co. Aytch, A Yankee Private's Civil War, and I Rode With Stonewall, all several years ago, and currently Bruce Catton's two Grant books, Grant Moves South and now Grant Takes Command.
 

Polloco

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If my eyes a can stand the workout, I will be attempting to reread Shelby Foote's The Civil War, A Narrative again. I enjoyed it the first time around. This will be kind of a "refresher course" but these eyes are not what they were 30+ years ago. The print seems to have shrunk?
 
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jackt62

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I generally don't reread books, no matter how interesting I find a particular one. However, after reading the abridged version of "Lee's Lieutenants" I plan on reading the full volume of that history.
 

Bruce Vail

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Have you read the other books in the series? I've read them all, and I think "Lincoln" is my favorite.
No, but I should have copies of Lincoln and Empire around the house somewhere. I've been meaning to read the others, but have never gotten around to it.
 

Saint Jude

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I will be attempting to reread Shelby Foote's The Civil War, A Narrative again. I enjoyed it the first time around.
With the exception of the Bible, I hardly ever read a book more than once. However, I just started rereading this, and I find that all the reading I've done since I first read it has helped me identify the secondary sources on which he based his narrative and to more easily see how not using primary sources skewed certain parts of his narrative. Since I'm not concentrating on the "facts" this time around, I appreciate even more how he used his expertise as a novelist to engage readers in CW history.
 

Lampasas Bill

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Ever since I was introduced to it in my high school literature class (early 1960s) I have read and re-read Stephen Vincent Benet's epic poem "John Brown's Body." It tells the story of the Civil War through the experiences of a large cast of real and imagined characters using various poetic devices. It's one those books that a person can fall in love with. I certainly did.
 

Nathanb1

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I generally don't reread books, no matter how interesting I find a particular one. However, after reading the abridged version of "Lee's Lieutenants" I plan on reading the full volume of that history.
Oh yeah! One of my favorites I've been thinking about re-reading. I didn't know much when I started, so it would be interesting to do it after two visits to Virginia and etc....I'm thinking about re-reading Dr. Donald Frazier's Louisiana Quadrille, now that I know I had a relative involved in all this.
 

mrgrs27

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Ah, re-reads -- the comfortable old pair of shoes instead of those shiny new ones aka the "to be read pile" As for myself, frequent re-reads include anything by Catton, the 3 narrative western histories by DeVoto, an occasional dip into a chapter or two of Shelby Foote. Sometime around Thanksgiving, I'll pull Eric Jacobson's 'For Cause and Country' off the shelf to coincide with the Battle of Franklin anniversary.
 

Nathanb1

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Don't laugh--I need to get busy re-reading some of the Outlander series before the next TV season comes out in Jan. 2020 (and the next novel in the series comes out this year). I read them during my long (doctor-caused) illness. I'm not usually a "romance" reader. Well, almost never. Not that nuts about time travel, etc. But the author, Diana Gabaldon, did such an incredible job weaving her characters into history (from the Jacobite Rising of 1745 to the American Revolution, with lots of history in-between)--and her writing is so good, I fell in love with the whole thing. People think women just read this stuff for the sex scenes, but not me so much--that's the part I invariably skip. I like the way she writes battles (lots of confusion, which is entirely accurate) and her treatment of Native American cultures. I actually made a huge genealogical discovery, thanks to her. When researching the Battle of Alamance (Regulators vs Loyalists) I realized I might have an ancestor there. I can now say I had more than one. In fact, I got busy after that and went back to look at specific battles--and that's how I found my first Loyalist :cry:. Ah, well....
 

Norm53

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How long will I have to peruse this august thread until honest CWT members fess up to their multiple rereads of those American cultural and literary icons, Louis L'Amour and Mickey Spillane?
 

Nathanb1

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How long will I have to peruse this august thread until honest CWT members fess up to their multiple rereads of those American cultural and literary icons, Louis L'Amour and Mickey Spillane?
Not Mickey Spillane, but yep, Louis L'Amour--who indeed wrote about the places he'd been so well because he'd been there himself (The Mora Land Grant War got me hooked!)
 


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