BATTERY D, First Rhode Island Light Artillery

JAGwinn

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MEMBERS OF BATTERY D, FIRST RHODE ISLAND LIGHT ARTILLERY, VETERAN ASSOCIATION.
AT ROGER WILLIAMS PARK, JUNE, 1891.​

1 John S. Gorton. 2 John Rathbone. 3 John Brod. 4 Joseph W. Corey. 5 Charles Gallagher. 6 Charles E. May. 7 Ezra K. Parker. 8 Charles W. Cornell. 9 John J. Busby. 10 Samuel Jenkins.[1] 11 William H. Fisk. 12 Stephen Ballou. 13 James S. Hayward. 14 John J. Hopkins. 15 William Stalker. 16 Willett A. Johnson. 17 Daniel W. Elliott. 18 Lyman Nicholas.[1] 19 James Tanner. 20 Joseph F. Means. 21 Henry W. Smith. 22 Jeremiah D. Hopkins. 23 Frank M. Tucker. 24 John McKenna. 25 Erich P. Botter. 26 George Rathbone. 27 Clark Walker. 28 Halsey A. Aldrich. 29 Rice A. Wickes.[1] 30 George C. Sumner.[1] 31 Otis G. Handy. 32 Isaac D. Russell. 33 Joseph B. French. 34 Charles C. Gray. 35 George N. Hawkins. 36 Joseph B. Kenyon. 37 Edwin R. Knight. 38 Moses Budlong. 39 Capt. J. Albert Monroe.[1] 40 George E. Arnold. 41 Olney Arnold.[1] 42 Henry C. Whitaker. 43 Charles E. Bonn.[1] 44 Gideon Spencer. 45 Christopher H. Carpenter.

[1]Deceased.

the book is here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/58833

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JAGwinn

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The book is a very good read; full of names and histories of men of the Unit. This following is the ending of the narration of the story of the Firts Rhode Island BATTERY D :

-This ended all movements until February 27th, when Gen. Sheridan started with ten thousand cavalrymen and two sections of artillery on his successful trip up the valley, through to Grant's army before Petersburg. At Waynesboro he captured all of Early's command, and the valley was clear of any large force of the enemy.

On the 10th of March we broke camp and moved near Winchester, remaining in this camp a short time, and then moved to the east of Winchester about a mile and went into camp. Our duties there were light. We fired a salute of one hundred guns on Lee's surrender. Knowing that the war was about over, we had very short drills, both mounted and the manual.

On the 4th of July we received orders to turn in our battery and other government property, and proceed to Rhode Island. It is needless to say that this order was received by the men with every conceivable manifestation of joy; some hugged each other, while others shouted and threw their hats in the air, and when "water call" was blown it took fifteen minutes to form the line, but after that things quieted down, and on the morning of the 10th we started for home, under command of Capt. Corthell, taking the cars as far as New York, and then the steamer John Brooks, which landed us at Fox Point wharf on the morning of July 13th.

The officers accompanying Capt. Corthell and belonging to the battery were First Lieuts. Frederick Chase and Charles E. Bonn, and Second Lieut. Charles C. Gray. The men numbered ninety-five, and presented a remarkably fine appearance, having nearly new uniforms.

[Pg 155]

We were received by the Mechanic Rifles and a detachment of the Marine Artillery, and escorted to Washington Hall, where we found a bountiful collation prepared for us by L.H. Humphreys. The collation was soon over, and the men dismissed with orders to report at the Revenue Office, on South Main Street, on the 17th for final pay and muster out.

On the 17th of July, 1865, the battery was mustered out by Capt. Joseph S. York, of the Fifteenth United States Infantry, and Battery D, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, was no more; but we all felt that the battery had made a record that was honorable alike to itself and the State.


.Just who were the Mechanic Rifles?
 

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