Another Model, Yazoo Monster

kevin klein

Private
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
I said last time my next project is the Stonewall, but I got inspired by the "Yazoo Monster". Depicted here undergoing construction. There are small figures on the ground, the aft deck and one on the rear of the casemate to represent
scale. Next it will be completed as a finished waterline model. Thanks to Rebelatsea and his diagram. I hope you don't mind.



DSCN2607.JPG


DSCN2606.JPG
 
Last edited:

georgew

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Location
southern california
I said last time my next project is the Stonewall, but I got inspired by the "Yazoo Monster". Depicted here undergoing construction. Next it will be completed as a finished waterline model. Thanks to Rebelatsea and his diagram. I hope you don't mind.



View attachment 412900

View attachment 412901
Assuming this is to scale, how were they going to launch it? It does sort of appear to be a Nashville on steroids. You seem to depict the wheelhouses inboard in the casemate. Would the sponsons be wide enough for the width of the paddle boards? Also, it seems to me that I.N. Brown had a habit of keeping the wheels outboard from the hull on his projects in Tennessee. I realize that Brown took over an existing project and would have had to cope. Does anyone have data on the status of this vessel when Brown took over the project? And do we know if this ship would have had sloping side to the casemate vs Arkansas sides? The latter would have been easier to frame and plank. As for ironing, I don't think plate was ever it this monster's future, but perhaps RR iron. You also wonder where they would have gathered up enough guns for a battery. Brown had enough trouble with the smaller Arkansas. Any way, nice work.
 

kevin klein

Private
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Assuming this is to scale, how were they going to launch it? It does sort of appear to be a Nashville on steroids. You seem to depict the wheelhouses inboard in the casemate. Would the sponsons be wide enough for the width of the paddle boards? Also, it seems to me that I.N. Brown had a habit of keeping the wheels outboard from the hull on his projects in Tennessee. I realize that Brown took over an existing project and would have had to cope. Does anyone have data on the status of this vessel when Brown took over the project? And do we know if this ship would have had sloping side to the casemate vs Arkansas sides? The latter would have been easier to frame and plank. As for ironing, I don't think plate was ever it this monster's future, but perhaps RR iron. You also wonder where they would have gathered up enough guns for a battery. Brown had enough trouble with the smaller Arkansas. Any way, nice work.
It does not yet have the wheelhouse installed. From what I understand, it was built inland then towed unfinished down the Yazoo river then later burned to prevent capture during the Union raid at Yazoo City. As for scale, it is 1:369. This may not be an accurate depiction, there are a number of sources showing different configurations, according to Rebelatsea's research this might be fairly close.
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
The picture shows two stacks in line beam to beam next to the paddle structures. Your model isn't a representation of that with its 3 centerline stacks. Is that due to drawings that differ from the photo-content? All in all, I like it, especially the skids it rests upon.
Lubliner.
 

kevin klein

Private
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
The picture shows two stacks in line beam to beam next to the paddle structures. Your model isn't a representation of that with its 3 centerline stacks. Is that due to drawings that differ from the photo-content? All in all, I like it, especially the skids it rests upon.
Lubliner.
Good catch, the third stack is on the ground awaiting installation. The perspective makes it look as though they are beam to beam. The color photo is the same model with all three stacks in place.
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
I said last time my next project is the Stonewall, but I got inspired by the "Yazoo Monster". Depicted here undergoing construction. There are small figures on the ground, the aft deck and one on the rear of the casemate to represent
scale. Next it will be completed as a finished waterline model. Thanks to Rebelatsea and his diagram. I hope you don't mind.



View attachment 412900

View attachment 412901
Not all, you know I like and appreciate your work. For those who haven't seen it, here is my interpretation of the plan John L Porter may have provided, given the available info we have.
J.L.Porter's Yazoo Monster. css new orleans.jpg
J.L.Porter's Yazoo Monster. css new orleans.jpg
 

Kazziga

Corporal
Joined
Mar 22, 2011
Location
Gliwice, Poland
Interesting that Mr. Stehman interpreted it as a double-ender. (I consider that doubtful, but it's a very interesting speculation.)
According to a witness description she was supposed to be a double-ender. I don't remember the exact phrase (hopefully Bil R or John W will correct me), but the guy described as skiff-like and able to go both ways.
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
According to a witness description she was supposed to be a double-ender. I don't remember the exact phrase (hopefully Bil R or John W will correct me), but the guy described as skiff-like and able to go both ways.
Hello Kaz, you are not quite right. He described the hull as "Skiff built, the same at both ends" The hulls below the knuckle on all Porter's derivatives of the 150ft PP were symmetrical. The comment tells us that the construction had got that far. I don't think the vessel if completed would have looked like Porter's plan. Mallory told Weldon & McFarland to make whatever changes required to expedite completion, and with I.N.Brown supervising I think the result would have resembled a large paddle version of Arkansas. It's something I want to draw but never got round to it.
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
According to a witness description she was supposed to be a double-ender. I don't remember the exact phrase (hopefully Bil R or John W will correct me), but the guy described as skiff-like and able to go both ways.
Interesting that Mr. Stehman interpreted it as a double-ender. (I consider that doubtful, but it's a very interesting speculation.)
Mark, Dean told me that he gave two wheels and a screw at each end to match what he knew of her at the time. The original of that must be thirty years old if it's a day !
 

kevin klein

Private
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Well, it still tricks my eyesight no matter how I view it, appearing beam to beam in the still photograph.
What is the fence like structure along the side in front of the paddle covering, and what purpose does it serve; support strength?
Lubliner.
Here you go, the funnels are in line. The structure on the side represents the framework for the sponsons, like the one shown in the photo.

DSCN2614.JPG


DSCN2616.JPG
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
From what I understand, it was built inland then towed unfinished down the Yazoo river then later burned to prevent capture during the Union raid at Yazoo City.
Same for the CSS Arkansas, along with its tender, the Star of the West. Were both at Yazoo City at the same time?
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Were both at Yazoo City at the same time?
It's my understanding the "Yazoo Monster" was in her embryonic stage at Yazoo City.
Seems the Arkansas immediately took priority once that vessel had been raised and towed down to Yazoo.

But to be honest, I don't know enough about this "super ironclad" to really comment.

I can't wait to learn more from our naval experts.

No doubt the CSN may have been planning on constructing another powerful ironclad at this inland yard, but
IMHO, it could not have been the largest.

The Yazoo River is just too small for large vessels.
The United States Navy learned that fact very quickly during the opening stages of the Vicksburg campaign.
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
Here is a "quick and dirty" vision of what I think I.N.Brown would have had the vessel completed as. Minus all John Porter's characteristic features for economy of materiel and to speed construction. I feel he would have dispensed with Tennessee (I)'s machinery, possibly for use in another vessel or perhaps James H Warner at Columbus could utilise it. Porter's plan had wide spaced ports to accommodate 7" MLR, but Brown would have to use what he could aquire so I have closed up the spacing to 10ft and given it Arkansas style frigate ports.
I.N.BROWN'S  Yazoo Monster. css new orleans.jpg
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
It's my understanding the "Yazoo Monster" was in her embryonic stage at Yazoo City.
Seems the Arkansas immediately took priority once that vessel had been raised and towed down to Yazoo.

But to be honest, I don't know enough about this "super ironclad" to really comment.

I can't wait to learn more from our naval experts.

No doubt the CSN may have been planning on constructing another powerful ironclad at this inland yard, but
IMHO, it could not have been the largest.

The Yazoo River is just too small for large vessels.
The United States Navy learned that fact very quickly during the opening stages of the Vicksburg campaign.
Extract from my book "The Southern Iron Navy"

The Yazoo Monster – CSS New Orleans

"The un- named monster" was at the time, the biggest warship ever built inland.
Type: Ironclad side wheel Frigate.
Paddles: two 40ft side-wheels powered by 2 “standard” western river type engines.
Screws: two 8ft, Speed: 9.5 knots calculated, 13 – 16 knots intended.
Dimensions: 310ft OA, x 70ft EX, x 12ft D, 3,720 tons.
Guns: intended 12 -7” Brooke MLR
Armour: 4.5” iron, from Shelby Iron Co. over 24” timber. Casemate slope 35 degrees.
Design: J. L. Porter. Builder: T. Weldon / J. McFarland, Yazoo City Navy Yard, Mississippi.
Laid Down: October 1862 Destroyed to prevent capture 21 May 1863
History:
The hull was “Skiff built”, double ended, causing much confusion over the years, being taken to mean that the vessel had one screw at each end. Balance of weight plus the inherent drawbacks of having one screw and rudder at each end strongly indicate that the screw machinery layout was traditional. The two 8ft screws are a strong indication that the boilers and machinery constructed for CSS Arkansas’ sister ship Tennessee were to be utilised in this vessel. No doubt as constructed it would have been very different as the constructors, guided by Isaac Newton Brown, would have made use of available resource and his experience with CSS Arkansas. Her ordnance may well have been composed of whatever was available. No name was ever assigned but CSS New Orleans has been suggested as being appropriate for morale
 
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