9th Texas Infantry

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The 9th Texas Infantry was organized on November 4, 1861, mainly from companies recruited in Northeast Texas, and was mustered into service on December 1, 1861, under Colonel Sam Bell Maxey of Paris, Texas. The Ninth would bear the distinction of serving in the Army of the Mississippi/Army of Tennessee longer than any other Texas regiment. Throughout most of the war it would serve as part of Ector's Texas Brigade, one of two premier Texas infantry brigades in that army.

Initial organization of the regiment:
Company A - Lamar County, Capt. E. J. Shelton
Company B - Red River County, Capt. Smith Ragsdale
Company C - Grayson County, Capt. William Hugh Young
Company D - Titus County, Capt. James H. McReynolds
Company E - Lamar County, Capt. James Hill
Company F - Hopkins County, Capt. James A. Leftwich
Company G - Hopkins County, Capt. Joseph A. Moore
Company H - Fannin County, Capt. Harvey Wise
Company I - Collin County, Capt. J. J. Dickson
Company K - Lamar County, Capt. Miles A. Dillard

The Ninth was organized at Camp Rusk in Lamar County, but due to poor quality of the water and many coming down with measles and pneumonia they were moved to Camp Benjamin in Fannin County shortly thereafter. In January 1862 they marched across the Mississippi River, arriving at Iuka in February and thence to Corinth, Miss. On March 4, Col. Maxey was promoted to brigadier general and left the regiment; Major Wright A. Stanley then took command.

While at Corinth the 9th Texas was placed in J. Patton Anderson's brigade, Ruggles' division, Bragg's II Corps, and would see their first action at Shiloh the following month. Due to sickness and the detachment of two companies, the Ninth carried only 226 officers and men into battle. Heavily engaged on the first day, April 6, the regiment suffered a loss of 14 killed, 42 wounded, and 11 missing. Capt. Dickson and Lt. Hamil were among the killed, and Capt. Moore died of his wounds on April 11.

Following the Conscription Act, the regiment was reorganized at Corinth on May 8, 1862. William Hugh Young was elected colonel by the men. At only 24 years old, he would command the regiment for the next two years.

William+Young.jpg

Colonel William Hugh Young of the 9th Texas Infantry. Wounded six times throughout the war.

Previously armed with a mix of weapons, "double-barreled shot-guns, sportsman's rifles, and muskets, many of them in bad order", on August 15, 1862, Ordnance Sgt. Ben R. Milam sent in a requisition for 400 Enfield rifles. He noted that the regiment had only 25 Enfield rifles at the time. They never did receive the new Enfields, but did acquire 360 Belgian rifles.

As part of Cheatham's Division, the 9th Texas served among Tennessee regiments in Preston Smith's/Alfred J. Vaughn's Brigade throughout the latter half of 1862, seeing action at Perryville and Stones River/Murfreesboro. The Ninth was heavily engaged in the latter. In the fighting on December 31 at what became known as the "Slaughter Pen" they were separated from the brigade and came face to face with the 35th Illinois. The Illinoisans' fire staggered the Ninth for a second, but Col. Young, shot off his horse, grabbed the colors and rallied the regiment, ordering them forward with a shout "a la Texas" and driving back the 35th Illinois. With the subsequent advance of other troops to their right and left, the Federal line at the Slaughter Pen collapsed.

In his official report, Gen. Cheatham wrote that "The 9th Texas Regiment, under the command of that gallant officer, Col. W.H. Young, who did not hear the order [to withdraw] became detached and was farther to the left. It remained in the woods and continued to fight the enemy, and at last charged them on their flank and drove them from the woods on their entire right, losing very heavily."

Of 323 officers and men engaged, the 9th Texas lost 18 killed, 102 wounded, and 2 missing. They would never again rebuild their strength back up to 300 men. Col. Young was shot through the shoulder and had two horses shot from under him in the battle.

On January 21, 1863, the 9th Texas was placed in Brig. Gen. Mathew D. Ector's Texas Brigade, which then consisted of the 10th, 14th, and 32nd Texas Cavalry (dismounted). The men of the Ninth were glad to finally fight alongside fellow Texans and would remain in Ector's Brigade through the war. Two North Carolina regiments, the 29th and 39th, would later be added to the brigade as well.

In May 1863 they were sent to Jackson, Miss., to join Joe Johnston's Army of Relief, taking part in the battle and siege there following the surrender of Vicksburg in July.

Rejoining the Army of Tennessee by late summer of 1863, Ector's Brigade was engaged at Chickamauga as part of Brig. Gen. States Rights Gist's small division. On the morning of September 19 Forrest personally sent Ector's men into the fight at Jay's Mill on the far Confederate right flank in support of Dibrell's cavalry brigade. Charging up against Van Derveer's Federal brigade, they were caught in a short but intense firefight. Suffering heavy losses and unable to push Van Derveer's men back, they withdrew from the field. To make matters worse, the brigade was later attacked on the flank and a number of men were captured. The 9th Texas, positioned on the right of Ector's Brigade in the initial charge, suffered losses of 6 killed, 36 wounded, and 6 missing out of only 145 taken into action, or 41.4%; Col. Young was again wounded, this time in the chest. Ector's Brigade lost over 50%, Ector himself slightly wounded four times and two horses shot from under him. The following day, September 20, they were lightly engaged in the action at the Kelly Field.

After Chickamauga the brigade was sent back to Mississippi for the next seven months. There Ector's Brigade was assigned to Polk's Corps (later Third Corps of the AoT), Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French's Division. Also in the division was Cockrell's Missouri Brigade and Sears' Mississippi Brigade; the Texans made quick friends with the Missourians, giving each other the nicknames "Jakes" and "Chubs" and participating in mock battles with flaming pine cones.

Arriving in Rome, Ga., May 17, 1864, Ector's Texans and North Carolinians would again rejoin the Army of Tennessee and begin the Atlanta Campaign. Though not engaged in every major battle, they were under fire daily for the next four months - marching and digging entrenchments in the summer heat or rain and mud when they were not. The Ninth saw particularly heavy skirmishing at New Hope Church, the Latimer House, and Kennesaw Mountain. At Kennesaw they fought off the Federal attacks up Pigeon Hill on June 27; Col. Young suffered yet another wound there in the neck and jaw. Only lightly engaged at Peach Tree Creek, they were in the trenches at Atlanta throughout the siege, always under fire. On July 27 Gen. Ector was wounded by a shell fragment in the lower left thigh, necessitating its amputation and permanently removing him from the field.

After Atlanta fell, French's Division took up position south of the city at Lovejoy's Station. Throughout the campaign the Ninth suffered a loss of 16 killed, 39 wounded, 1 captured. In the skirmishing around Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station two color bearers were lost: Ensign Ben Milam, recently been promoted, was shot and disabled, and C.B. Douglass was mortally wounded.

Following the Atlanta Campaign, French's Division would march north to Allatoona Pass with the objective of ransacking the Federal supply stores and Western & Atlantic R.R. there. Attacking the Federal fortifications at Allatoona on October 5, 1864, Ector's Brigade and the Ninth would see perhaps the fiercest fighting they would ever take part in throughout the war. Shortly before they were ordered forward, Maj. James H. McReynolds of the Ninth reported that the "men were addressed in a few brief words by our gallant brigadier-general (Young), telling us what was expected of us and directing us what part of the enemy's lines to charge. . . . We then rushed forward under a very destructive fire, every man striving for who would be the first to mount the enemy's works."

In support of Cockrell's Missourians, the Texans and North Carolinians would charge Rowett's Redoubt, running over open ground through tree stumps and abatis under a hail of fire from the Henry repeater-armed 7th Illinois. They then engaged in a bitter hand-to-hand contest over the works, forcing the Federal troops back to the Star Fort. Unable to dislodge the garrison from there and with approaching Federal reinforcements, the attack was called off and French's troops reluctantly withdrew.

Out of only 101 men engaged, the 9th Texas lost 43 killed and wounded and two missing. The officer corps of the Ninth suffered heavily. Major McReynolds, commanding the regiment, was wounded; Capt. Jesse Bates, Adjutant Griffin, and Lt. Dixon Wetzel were all killed; and Captains T. J. Van Noy of Company D and Dee Ridley of Company K, along with Lieutenants Agee of Company F and D. P. Tunnell of Company I were all wounded. William H. Young, who had been promoted to brigadier general and was commanding the brigade at Allatoona, had his horse shot out from under him in the charge; proceeding to lead the men on foot, he then took a shot through the left ankle. He was captured after the battle when the ambulance carrying him took a wrong turn. Young later had his foot amputated in a Federal hospital and was imprisoned at Johnson's Island for the remainder of the war, not released until July 1865.

With less than 600 effectives after Allatoona Pass, Ector's Brigade - now under Col. David Coleman of the 39th North Carolina - followed the Army of Tennessee as it embarked on Hood's Tennessee Campaign in November of 1864. Guarding the army's supply train, they were lucky enough to miss the bloodletting at Franklin, returning only to find Cockrell's and Sears' brigades shot all to shreds. On December 15 at Nashville, Ector's Brigade fell back in the wake of the Federal advance. The following day the brigade was initially positioned atop Shy's Hill but was moved south to support the cavalry on the flank, avoiding the major rout there and standing their ground, helping to guard the retreat. In his report, Gen. A. P. Stewart stated that "I have been told [Ector's Brigade] were characterized by the usual intrepidity of this small but firm and reliable body of men." The brigade was chosen as part of the rear guard during Hood's retreat. At least 9 men in the 9th Texas were wounded and 16 captured during the campaign.

Returning to Mississippi to rest for a time, French's Division was detached from the Army of Tennessee in early 1865 and sent to Mobile in defense of Mobile Bay. The Ninth under Lt. Col. Miles A. Dillard and Ector's Brigade under Col. David Coleman of the 39 North Carolina, they were stationed at Spanish Fort. With a major Union advance on Mobile - Gen. Edward Canby with two corps, 45,000 men - forts Blakely and Spanish Fort on the eastern side of the bay would come under siege. Spanish Fort was under siege from March 27 through April 8, 1865. Ector's Brigade manned the left flank. Both sides only 30 or so yards apart, the siege was marked by constant sharpshooting and raids on each other's picket lines. After a terrific bombardment on April 8 an assault finally fell on the Confederate left. The Federal advance led by the 8th Iowa, many of the Texans and Tar Heels were captured, fled, or died literally fighting in the last ditch. Those who got away escaped with the rest of the garrison that night on a narrow treadway to Fort Huger, thence boarding boats across the bay to Mobile.

In the 9th Texas at least 14 men were wounded and 8 captured at Spanish Fort. With the Ninth down to company strength and Ector's Brigade about the size of a regiment, what few men remained surrendered with the rest of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana on May 4, 1865, in Meridian, Miss. Out of 1,018 Texans who had served in the Ninth, only 8 officers and 79 men remained to lay down their arms. In a last act of defiance, Pvt. Charles P. Matthews cut the flag from the staff, tucked it away, and carried it home with him. The men were paroled on May 11 and finally allowed to make their way back home to Texas.


A good history of the 9th Texas Infantry by Tim Bell can be read here: http://www.lamarcountytx.org/civilwar/9hist.shtm

Roster: http://www.lamarcountytx.org/civilwar/9thinf.shtm

More info: http://www.lamarcountytx.org/civilwar/9thmain.shtm
 

AUG

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matthew3.jpg

Postwar photo of Pvt. Charles P. Matthews with flag of the 9th Texas Infantry, taken at his home in Paris, Texas, ca. early 1900s. In the surrender at Meridian, Miss., May 4, 1865, Matthews cut the flag from the staff and brought it home with him rather than surrender it.

The story of Pvt. Matthews and the flag can be read here: http://www.lamarcountytx.org/civilwar/9inflag.shtm

On a visit to Richmond, Va., in March 1864, Col. William H. Young acquired a batch of Richmond Depot battle flags for Ector's Brigade. He returned in May and presented each regiment with its new colors. Thus Ector's Brigade was one of the only units in the Army of Tennessee to carry Richmond Depot pattern battle flags, which were primarily issued to the Army of Northern Virginia. The Ninth's flag was carried throughout the Atlanta Campaign, Allatoona Pass, Tennessee Campaign, and in the Siege of Spanish Fort. The flag is a RD Fourth Bunting Issue.

9inflag.jpg
 

colt45texan

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Nice read. Three of my ancestors were in Co. F, 9th Texas Infantry. The picture to the left is of 2 of them.
 
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Nice read. Three of my ancestors were in Co. F, 9th Texas Infantry. The picture to the left is of 2 of them.
Saw your previous thread on them here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/picture-of-my-reb-ancestors.119698/

tumblr_oju5h4q3Mx1rm9yhio1_400.jpg

tumblr_oju5h4q3Mx1rm9yhio2_500.jpg

Sgt. James Selen Stout (top), and his sons, John and Benjamin Stout, Co. F, 9th Texas Infantry, ca. 1861.

And this was probably you then, but there's a great article on James Selen Stout here: http://lastoftheplainsmen.freeforums.org/frontiersman-texas-ranger-james-selen-stout-t2234.html

Here he is on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Stout&GSfn=JAmes&GSmn=Selen&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=19995109&df=all&
 
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colt45texan

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Saw your previous thread on them here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/picture-of-my-reb-ancestors.119698/

View attachment 138908
View attachment 138909
Sgt. James Selen Stout (top), and his sons, John and Benjamin Stout, Co. F, 9th Texas Infantry, ca. 1861.

And this was probably you then, but there's a great article on James Selen Stout here: http://lastoftheplainsmen.freeforums.org/frontiersman-texas-ranger-james-selen-stout-t2234.html

Here he is on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Stout&GSfn=JAmes&GSmn=Selen&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=19995109&df=all&
Saw your previous thread on them here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/picture-of-my-reb-ancestors.119698/

View attachment 138908
View attachment 138909
Sgt. James Selen Stout (top), and his sons, John and Benjamin Stout, Co. F, 9th Texas Infantry, ca. 1861.

And this was probably you then, but there's a great article on James Selen Stout here: http://lastoftheplainsmen.freeforums.org/frontiersman-texas-ranger-james-selen-stout-t2234.html

Here he is on Find A Grave: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Stout&GSfn=JAmes&GSmn=Selen&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=19995109&df=all&
 

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Col. William H. Young's official report of the battle of Stones River/Murfreeboro.


Report of Colonel William H. Young, Ninth Texas Infantry.

JANUARY 6, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my regiment while separated from the brigade in the action of December 31, 1862:

The regiment advanced in its proper position with the brigade until the brigade entered the corn-field in front of the original line of battle occupied by it. Here the regiment by its position, was immediately on the left of the field when the brigade became engaged. There being no enemy in my front, I moved forward, by order of Captain Cluskey, to the top of the next hill, when the enemy appeared off to my right-oblique about 200 yards. I ordered the regiment to fire, upon which they poured two volleys into the enemy; but perceiving that the brigade had obliqued to the right and knowing that my fire would be more effective by a nearer approach to the enemy, I moved by the right flank until my right was near the Twenty-ninth Tennessee; I then moved by the left flank and took position behind a tall fence and opened fire on the enemy, who was posted about 100 yards immediately in my front, behind a ledge of rocks and a fence.

Here General Wood's brigade, which was on my left when Captain Cluskey ordered me forward, came up on my left again and opened fire; but seeing that our combined attack had but little effect toward dislodging the enemy, I ordered my regiment to cross the fence for the purpose of charging the enemy's position, which they did, but, mistaking my intention, advanced 50 paces and again halted and opened fire. Here, while endeavoring to get them to hear my command "forward," my horse was shot, as well as that of the lieutenant-colonel, and for five minutes the regiment received a most murderous fire, which killed and wounded more than 100 of my men, including nearly all of the commissioned officers. Seeing that we were suffering from a cross-fire, I resolved to charge and rout the enemy from his position. Passing down the line, I notified each company of my intention, and then, taking the colors, I ordered the regiment to move forward with a shout, both of which they did a la Texas.

It was at this juncture that Captain Cluskey, who had been with the regiment all the time since it became engaged, rode off to the balance of the brigade. Charging with a yell through the cedar brake in our front, the enemy fled at our approach. Having halted at the position formerly occupied by the enemy, we poured a fire into them as they retreated (with great loss) through the open woods which make up into the field in which is situated the first Abolition hospital we passed; but seeing they were getting out of range, and thinking the brigade had advanced on my right, I crossed the second fence and pursued after the enemy, who were completely thrown into confusion in the immediate front of my regiment and Wood's brigade, which had been advancing steadily after my regiment on the left.

Here I discovered an extended line of battle moving across the open field a short distance in advance up the slope the sun revealed their blue coats, and we opened on them. They, as well as the line (rather mass) in our front, continued to retreat until they entered a wood about a quarter of a mile beyond the hospital above named. We followed them, advancing as far as the upper edge of the woods which make up into the field. Here some half a dozen batteries opened on us from almost every point of the edge of the woods opposite, and, seeing that the troops on the right were not advancing, we fell back a short distance after Wood's brigade and reformed.

Here I dispatched a messenger in search of the brigade, but he failing to find it, I advanced with a battalion of sharpshooters, which had attached itself to my left, moving to the right-oblique across the open field and past the Abolition hospital above named some considerable distance, when a staff officer notified me that Cheatham's division was advancing in my rear, and that Maney's brigade, from whom I was concealed by the buildings of the hospital, would fire on me for the enemy's sharpshooters if they saw me. So, requesting him to ride back and notify that brigade, I fell back and formed on General Maney's left, where our own brigade found us upon advancing.

I cannot speak in too high terms of the conduct of my officers and men. My commissioned officers all did their duty bravely, so I will not specify any in particular. Lieutenant-Colonel Miles A. Dillard was conspicuous for the zeal, energy, and bravery he displayed during the whole day. My loss has been furnished numerically in another report.

With much respect, I am, captain, your obedient servant,

WM. H. YOUNG,

Colonel, Commanding Ninth Texas Infantry.​


Here are a couple of Ed Bearss's maps of the battle I cropped to show the 9th Texas's actions at the Slaughter Pen.
 

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Major James H. McReynolds' OR of the battle of Allatoona Pass.


Report of Major James H. McReynolds, Ninth Texas Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH TEXAS INFANTRY,

Near Tuscumbia, November 1, 1864.

COLONEL: In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report of the part performed by this regiment in battle of Allatoona:

On the morning of the 5th of October we, with the Fourteenth and Tenth Texas Cavalry (dismounted) and Twenty-ninth North Carolina Infantry (our regiment being on the right), were formed in line of battle in a hollow about 600 yards from the enemy's works. About 10 a. m. the command forward was given. We moved forward with the three regiments above named (the Missouri brigade being in our front, we acting as a support to it) about 300 yards, when we were halted and caused to lay down probably five minutes, the Missouri brigade pressing forward, taking the first line of works. We were then ordered forward again. The regiment moved forward in fine order, considering the great obstacles, such as fallen trees, brush, rough ground, &c. At the first line of enemy's works men were addressed in a few brief words by our gallant brigadier- general (Young), telling us what was expected of us and directing us what part of the enemy's lines to charge. Up to this time we had received no loss. We then rushed forward under a very destructive fire, every man striving for who would be first to mount the enemy's works. We captured some prisoners, killed quite a number of the enemy, having them to fight until we mounted their works. Crossed the second line and rushed forward to the third, still under a deadly fire. Took the third line, capturing a few prisoners and killing quite a number, the remainder making their escape to their main fort. We then took position, some in the ditches and some in advance of the ditches, wherever they could get protection, and sharpshot the batteries and men to the best advantage possible.

The fight continued from 10 a. m. until 1. 30 p. m., when we were ordered to withdraw in small squads, which order was obeyed. All this was done in conjunction with the three regiments above mentioned, and supported the Missouri brigade, whose conduct in the fight could not be surpassed. The conduct of the regiment was all that could be desired.

Lieutenant J. P. Bates, of Company G, was killed among the foremost, far in advance of the enemy's third line, near their main fort. Sergt. C. E. Dale, Company B, who was among the first to mount the works, was shot dead.

Where all acted so well it would be doing injustice to make distinction.

We took 101 men in the fight, including officers and infirmary corps, and lost 43 killed and wounded and 2 missing.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

J. H. MCREYNOLDS,

Major, Commanding.

Maps of the battle below, courtesy of Civil War Virtual Tours.
 

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ninthtexasinfantry.jpg

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txcolli3/Peoples/peoplec.htm

Photo of Collin County veterans of Company I, 9th Texas Infantry.

front: A. J. Scribner, Wood Harris, J. J. Thomson, R. M. Board, J. H. Jenkins, Sol Dobson, Arch Candler

back: Joe Anderson, Ben Whisenant, J. B. Faulkner, John Whisenant, Tom H. Muse, Arch Scott

Candler's and Faulkner's accounts were posted above.
 

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Col. Wright A. Stanley's OR of the battle of Shiloh.


Report of Col. W. A. Stanley, Ninth Texas Infantry.

HDQRS. NINTH REGT. TEXAS INFANTRY,

Corinth, Miss., April 15, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to report the proceedings of my regiment
in the battle of Shiloh on April 6 and 7:

On the morning of the 6th we advanced in line of battle under a heavy
fire of artillery and musketry from the enemy's first encampment. Being
ordered to charge the battery with our bayonets, we made two
successive attempts; but finding, as well as our comrades in arms on our
right and left, it almost impossible to withstand the heavy fire directed
at our ranks, we were compelled to withdraw for a short time, with
considerable loss. Being then ordered we immediately proceeded
to the support of the Washington Artillery, which, from their
battery's well-directed fire, soon silenced the battery of the enemy, after
which we immediately charged, routing the enemy from their first
encampment, and continued a forward, double-quick march until we
passed through two other encampments of the enemy, where we found
our troops again heavily engaged with a second battery and its supports,
to the galling fire of which my regiment was openly exposed.

At this point my horse was shot under me and several of my bravest
men were killed and wounded. We nevertheless succeeded in driving the
enemy from their battery, killing a number and pursuing the remainder
a considerable distance beyond.

At this point, the supply of ammunition in the cartridge boxes of my
men being exhausted, I was compelled to resort to my ammunition
wagon, a short distance off, for a fresh supply. In the mean time firing
continued incessantly on our right. We were then ordered to join the
command in that direction, which was reported to have the enemy badly
routed and driving them toward their gunboats. After proceeding some
distance we found ourselves in the range of shot and shell fired from the
boats and vicinity.

At this point night put a close to the action for the day of the 6th. We
retired from this point to form our encampment for the night, our troops
being more or less scattered, some having been completely exhausted
from the fatigues of the day. We then formed in two groups, leaving
one to encamp on the battle-field and the other near the general hospital.

On the morning of the 7th I again formed my regiment and proceeded
to the battle-field. After arriving there the enemy opened fire on our
left. We were ordered to the support of a battery stationed to defend that
point; but our support not being required at the time we reached the
battery, two companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers,
while the remainder stood in line of battle in a hollow at the distance of
200 yards from the breastworks of the enemy, our skirmishers returning
and reporting the enemy advancing toward the breastworks.

At this moment the skirmishers of the enemy appeared at the
breastworks, when we were ordered to charge them, which we did
successfully, although under a heavy fire of both musketry and artillery,
only 1 man being wounded in the charge.

After their guns were silenced at this point we were ordered to the right,
where a heavy fire of small-arms had commenced. On reaching the
scene of action at this point the enemy seemed to have been routed,
having ceased firing. After being halted and formed in line of battle
firing again commenced on our left. We were ordered again to that point
and there became engaged with a strong force off the enemy's line. We
advanced and sustained our position for some time after the troops on
our right and left had given way; but my regiment being small, and
losing two among our bravest officers [Capt. J. J. Dickson, of Company
I, and Lieut. Hamil, of Company F, they being killed at this point,
with several of my men], I was compelled to fall back, though still
keeping up our fire. We again rallied and formed in line, making a
desperate struggle, and causing the enemy to fall back for a short
distance. The enemy then making a move toward our right flank we fell
back in line, taking advantage of the cover of some rising ground to
receive them, and there remained, the enemy retiring toward the woods
on our right.

We were then withdrawn from the field.

The number taken into action was 226, including officers and enlisted
men.

The number killed in action was as follows:


K W M
Commissioned officers............. 3 2 ..
Enlisted men...................... 11 40 11

Total........................ 14 42 11

K=Killed. W=Wounded. M=Missing.



To the best of my recollection the foregoing is a correct report of the
proceedings of my regiment on the 6th and 7th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. STANLEY,
Col., Cmdg.

Gen. PATTON ANDERSON,
Cmdg. Second Brigade, Gen. Ruggles' Division.​
 

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Ran across this image of Samuel Bell Maxey in uniform.

Samuel Bell Maxey.jpg

Maxey was a Kentucky native, born in Tomkinsville on March 30, 1825. He attended West Point, graduating in 1846. He then served with the 7th U.S. Infantry Regiment in the Mexican War and was cited for gallantry in the battles of Cerro Gordo and Contrera, also participating in the battles of Churubusco and Molino del Rey. Maxey later resigned from the army in 1849 and took up law. He married in 1853 and eventually moved to Paris, Texas, with his family in 1857.

Maxey was elected the district attorney for Lamar County in 1858 and was a delegate to the state's Secession Convention in 1861. He then raised the 9th Texas Infantry by late 1861 with the intention of fighting east of the Mississippi, though he only served as its colonel for a short while until promoted to brigadier general in May 1862, commanding a brigade in Johnston's Army of Relief during the Vicksburg Campaign (not containing his old regiment). He was later assigned command of the Indian Territory in December 1863, commanding a division of cavalry and participating in the Camden Expedition in 1864. In 1865 Maxey turned command of the Indian Territory over to Stand Watie and left for Houston, commanding a division there until resigning in May.


Also a larger version of Col. William Hugh Young's photo.
William Hugh Young.jpg

William Hugh Young was born in Boonville, Missouri, January 1, 1838. He and his parents moved to Red River County, Texas, in 1841 and later to Grayson County. Young attended Washington College in Tennessee, McKenzie College in Texas and, between 1859 and 1861, the University of Virginia. After returning home to Texas in summer of 1861, he initially served as aide-de-camp to Governor Edward Clark. Young then raised a company in Grayson County for Confederate service, later organized as Company C of the 9th Texas Infantry by fall of that year.

When the regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Miss., May 8, 1862, Young was elected colonel. He would command the regiment for the next two years and was wounded six times in battle. He was wounded in the right shoulder at Stones River, having two horses shot out from under him; was wounded in the thigh at Jackson, Miss.; was shot through the left chest at Chickamauga; wounded in the neck and jaw at Kennesaw Mountain; and was shot through the left ankle and had his horse shot out from under him at Allatoona Pass, later having his left foot amputated.

After Brig. Gen. Mathew D. Ector was wounded and permanently disabled during the Atlanta Campaign on July 27, 1864, Col. Young took command of the brigade, promoted to brigadier general on August 15, 1864. Allatoona Pass was his first and only major battle as a brigadier general. After being shot through the ankle, the ambulance carrying him was captured by Federal cavalry near New Hope Church the following day, Young wounding up a prisoner. His left foot was amputated in a Federal hospital and he was imprisoned at Johnson's Island, Ohio, for the remainder of the war, not released until July 1865.

After the war Young returned to Texas, moving to San Antonio where he was a successful attorney and real estate investor, as well as owner of the San Antonio Express. He and his father later organized a transportation company that hauled freight between San Antonio and Monterrey, Mexico. He also organized the Nueces River Irrigation Company and acquired considerable ranch and farm property. He married Frances M. Kemper in 1869, and they had one son, Hugh Hampton Young, born in San Antonio in 1870.

William Hugh Young died in San Antonio on November 27, 1901, and is buried in the Confederate Cemetery there.

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sjw83071

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Initial organization of the regiment:
Company A - Lamar County, Capt. E. J. Shelton
Company B - Red River County, Capt. Smith Ragsdale
Company C - Grayson County, Capt. William Hugh Young
Company D - Titus County, Capt. James H. McReynolds
Company E - Lamar County, Capt. James Hill
Company F - Hopkins County, Capt. James A. Leftwich
Company G - Hopkins County, Capt. Joseph A. Moore
Company H - Fannin County, Capt. Harvey Wise
Company I - Collin County, Capt. J. J. Dickson
Company K - Lamar County, Capt. Miles A. Dillard
The 9th Texas Infantry was recruited from the same counties as the 11th Texas Cavalry. Their first Colonel was William Cocke Young from Red River County. Were he and Colonel William Hugh Young kin?
 

AUG

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Several company-grade officers of the Ninth....

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Lt. Jeremiah Stell "Jere" Crook.

Crook, Jere S., age 25, born abt. 1836, Pvt/1st Lt., Co. A, enlisted 26 Nov 1861 at Camp Rusk, Lamar Co., TX

Some more info on his Find A Grave page: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15391579/jeremiah-stell-crook


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Lt. James H. Jenkins.

Co I 9th Texas Infantry Lt James H. Jenkins was born in Morgan County, Illinois in 1831. He came to Texas in 1842 and began practicing law in 1859. In June 1861, after the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined the Collin County Volunteers. In October 1861 he transferred to Company I, 9th Texas Infantry, where he was appointed to the rank of Sergeant.​
Transferred east of the Mississippi River, the 9th Texas was stationed at Corinth, Mississippi. From there it marched to take part in the Battle of Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh) on April 6 & 7, 1862. In that engagement the regiment lost 14 killed, 42 wounded and 11 missing or captured. Sergeant Jenkins was among those taken captive. He was sent to the Camp Douglas, Ohio prisoner of war camp, where he remained until exchanged on October 7, 1862. Returning to the 9th Texas in January 1863, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.​
Jenkins fought in the May, 1863 battle of Jackson, Mississippi before being placed on detached duty by General Joseph E. Johnston. In September of 1864, Jenkins was assigned to the Hills Scouts by order of General John Bell Hood. He later served with Ector’s Brigade at the Battle of Nashville and during the siege of Spanish Fort outside Mobile, Alabama. Ector’s Brigade and the 9th Texas surrendered on May 4, 1865 at Meridian, Mississippi; at that time the remnant of the 9th Texas – a mere 8 officers and 79 men – was consolidated under the command of Captain R. Milton Board and Lt. James Jenkins.​
After the war James Jenkins returned to Texas and was a law partner to future Governor of Texas, James M Throckmorton.​

https://www.facebook.com/227082468793/photos/a.10156112955703794/10156784263653794/?type=3&theater

Another description from the Biographical Encyclopedia of Texas:

JENKINS, JAMES H. The subject of this memoir, a noted attorney of McKinney, Collin county, Texas, was born on the 8th day of January, 1831, (being the anniversary of the day on which General Jackson fought the battle of New Orleans) in Morgan county, Illinois. His father, James Jenkins, was a native of Bedford county, Tennessee, and followed through life agricultural pursuits. He died in Morgan county, Illinois. His mother, whose maiden name, was Tabitha Bristow, a native of Kentucky, daughter of Samuel Bristow, a Baptist, clergyman. James H. Jenkins was raised in Fannin, Red River, and Lamar counties, Texas, having emigrated to Texas in 1842. His first occupation in life was farming, which pursuit he followed assiduously until the age of twenty-five. His early literary attainments were limited, but he has through life been a close reader, keen and critical observer. In 1857 he began reading law at McKinney, Collin county, where he settled in 1855, and where he has since resided. In 1858 he was admitted to the bar, and immediately began the practice of his profession, soon taking rank as one of the able and successful attorneys of the Collin county bar. He has never sought or held office of a political responsibility, preferring to devote his attention exclusively to his duties as a lawyer. In 1861, he entered the Confederate army as a private soldier in Company I, 9th Texas infantry, and was in the service throughout the war—was made first lieutenant, in 1862, and was wounded three times. He took an active and soldierly part in the great battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, and Nashville, besides numerous other engagements of lesser note. In his military career he exhibited all the characteristics of a brave soldier and patriotic citizen. He is a member of the Christian Church, and has been an Elder in that church for ten years. In politics, he is a firm and unwavering democrat.​
He was married on the 26th day of April 1866 to Miss Maggie Johnson, of Independence, Jackson county, Missouri. Mr. Jenkins has been through life remarkable for temperate habits, integrity of character and public spirit.​

Find A Grave page: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6607089/james-h_-jenkins


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Capt. Robert Milton Board with his son Matthew, ca. 1870s.

Board, Robert Milton, age 23, born abt. 1837, 1st Sgt/Capt., Co. I, enlisted 9 Oct 1861 at McKinney, Collin Co., TX

More info on his Find A Grave page: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6465611/robert-milton-board
 
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