1909 Round Tops Panorama T&N

Gettysburg Greg

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Here is a panorama showing the Round Tops as they appeared in the winter of 1909. Visible on the summit of LRT is the 91st Pa. monument and the 44th NY Castle. Just to the left of the 44th monument is the witness pine tree that stood until brought down in a storm in 1979. Notice, also, that the Big Round Top observation tower can be seen in this view. I took the similar modern view on a recent visit to the battlefield.
lrt combo.jpg
 

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Tom Elmore

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Is that the observation tower discernible on Big Round Top in the 1909 shot? It reportedly stood from 1895-1968. I understand the foundation is still in place.
 

Bee

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Yup, I can see the tower! The absence of large trees is really evident in the "before" picture. Is this a product of the battle, or is it due to keeping the land open for grazing (at the time), or is it lack of foliage due to the winter season?
 

Gettysburg Greg

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Related to the OP is this photograph taken from the observation tower on BRT (seen in the OP) that shows Little Round Top on the right and the camera location of the original 1909 photo-marked with the arrow.
from brt1.jpg
 

Bee

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Related to the OP is this photograph taken from the observation tower on BRT (seen in the OP) that shows Little Round Top on the right and the camera location of the original 1909 photo-marked with the arrow.
I love it when you can recognize landmarks in these old timey pictures: The monuments stand out nicely.
 

Tom Elmore

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Greg, can we zoom in on those three structures along the Wheatfield road on the north end of the Wheatfield?

They do not appear on period maps, but I have long wondered if one of those structures was mentioned in an incident involving a Medal of Honor winner from the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves, per the following citation:

Mears, George W., Bloomsburg (Pennsylvania), Sergeant, Company A, 6th Pennsylvania Reserves. Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863. Citation given: 16 February 1897. With five volunteers he gallantly charged on a number of the enemy's sharpshooters concealed in a log house, captured them, and brought them into the Union lines.

It so happens that the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves passed right by that location on July 3 during an attempt to capture a section of Confederate artillery posted on the little bluff near the northwestern edge of the Wheatfield. It is quite possible Confederate skirmishers occupied a dwelling (if it was there during the battle) at that spot, because they fell back in front of the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves, and gave timely warning for the section to withdraw. Incidentally, I have never found any identification for those two guns, but suspect Parker's Virginia battery. This was part of the same reconnaissance that soon fell upon the 15th Georgia further to the south, although the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves did not take part in that movement.
 

Gettysburg Greg

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Location
Decatur, Illinois
Greg, can we zoom in on those three structures along the Wheatfield road on the north end of the Wheatfield?

They do not appear on period maps, but I have long wondered if one of those structures was mentioned in an incident involving a Medal of Honor winner from the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves, per the following citation:

Mears, George W., Bloomsburg (Pennsylvania), Sergeant, Company A, 6th Pennsylvania Reserves. Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863. Citation given: 16 February 1897. With five volunteers he gallantly charged on a number of the enemy's sharpshooters concealed in a log house, captured them, and brought them into the Union lines.

It so happens that the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves passed right by that location on July 3 during an attempt to capture a section of Confederate artillery posted on the little bluff near the northwestern edge of the Wheatfield. It is quite possible Confederate skirmishers occupied a dwelling (if it was there during the battle) at that spot, because they fell back in front of the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves, and gave timely warning for the section to withdraw. Incidentally, I have never found any identification for those two guns, but suspect Parker's Virginia battery. This was part of the same reconnaissance that soon fell upon the 15th Georgia further to the south, although the 6th Pennsylvania Reserves did not take part in that movement.
Tom, here is a blow up of the structures you referenced. I believe the one farthest to the north, top right, is the George Weikert farm. I am not sure about the two along the WR.
from brt1 - Copy.jpg
 


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