16th Alabama Infantry

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16th Alabama Volunteer Infantry
Organized at Courtland, AL
Mustered in August 6, 1861
Surrendered at Goldsboro, NC April 26, 1865

Assignments:
Zollicoffer's Brigade/Crittenden's Dept of East TN
SAM Wood's Brigade/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Simon Bolivar Buckner's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/D H Hill's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Cheatham's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Shelley's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee

Companies, Counties from which they were recruited, original Captains.
COMPANY A. - Franklin County; Capt John H. McGaughey
COMPANY B. - Lawrence County; Capt Frederick A. Ashford (became Col)
COMPANY C. - Lauderdale County; Capt. Alexander D. Coffee
COMPANY D. - Conecuh County; Capt. J. J. May (became Lt Col)
COMPANY E. - Franklin County; Capt. W. W. Weatherford
COMPANY F. - Lawrence County; Capt. William Hodges
COMPANY G. - Marion County; Capt. A. H. Helvenston
COMPANY H. - Franklin County; Capt. John W. Harris, Jr., (became Lt Col)
COMPANY I. - Lawrence County; Capt. William S. Bankhead
COMPANY K. - Marion County, Capt. the Rev. William Powers

The Sixteenth (Alabama Infantry) was organized at Courtland, (AL) August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.
Complete Historical Sketch/Regimental History located here http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm

This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and other relevant information about the 16th Alabama Infantry in the Regimental Histories Forum. Please do not start new threads - just add your content under this existing thread so it can be easily located. Thank you so much for contributing information about the 16th Alabama Infantry.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and other relevant information about the 16th Alabama Infantry in the Regimental Histories Forum. Please do not start new threads - just add your content under this existing thread so it can be easily located. Thank you so much for contributing information about the 16th Alabama Infantry.

16th Alabama Volunteer Infantry
Organized at Courtland, AL
Mustered in August 6, 1861
Surrendered at Goldsboro, NC April 26, 1865

Assignments:
Zollicoffer's Brigade/Crittenden's Dept of East TN
SAM Wood's Brigade/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Simon Bolivar Buckner's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/D H Hill's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Cheatham's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Shelley's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee

COMPANY A. - Franklin County; Capt John H. McGaughey
COMPANY B. - Lawrence County; Capt Frederick A. Ashford (became Col)
COMPANY C. - Lauderdale County; Capt. Alexander D. Coffee
COMPANY D. - Conecuh County; Capt. J. J. May (became Lt Col)
COMPANY E. - Franklin County; Capt. W. W. Weatherford
COMPANY F. - Lawrence County; Capt. William Hodges
COMPANY G. - Marion County; Capt. A. H. Helveston
COMPANY H. - Franklin County; Capt. John W. Harris, Jr., (became Lt Col)
COMPANY I. - Lawrence County; Capt. William S. Bankhead
COMPANY K. - Marion County, Capt. the Rev. William Powers

The Sixteenth Alabama Infantry was organized at Courtland, August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.
http://www.archives.alabama.gov/referenc/alamilor/16thinf.html

Complete Historical Sketch/Regimental History located here http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm


Shiloh after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. John W. Harris, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH REGT. ALABAMA VOLUNTEERS, Near
Corinth, Miss., April 8, 1862.

At 4 o'clock on the morning of April 3 I received orders from Gen.
Hindman, through Col. Patterson, commanding First Brigade, to
prepare five days' rations and be ready to march by 6 o'clock, but was
not ordered off until 11 a.m. Owing to indisposition and prostration of
the physical system I was not able to go with the regiment, so Maj.
Helvenston took command and marched in the direction of Pittsburg, on
the Tennessee River.

On Friday morning Gen. Wood rejoined his brigade, and Friday
evening the regiments were halted to rest, when firing was heard in
advance. By orders from Gen. Wood, Maj. Helvenston threw the
regiment into line of battle and awaited the attack of the enemy.

Hence, about dark, Maj. Helvenston marched, under orders, and
formed a new line half a mile to the right, and remained under arms
until 2 o'clock Saturday morning, when the line of march was resumed
and continued until 8 o'clock. Then the regiment was again thrown into
line of battle, with Col. Williams' on its left and Col. McKoin's
on its right, and marched for a short distance and halted. Here I joined
the regiment, having heard a fight was expected and being anxious to be
with my men in the engagement.

They remained under arms at this point until early Sunday morning,
when it was advanced in line of battle, with Maj. Hardcastle's battalion
in front as skirmishers.

Sharp skirmishes were kept up until the camps of the enemy were
reached, at 9 o'clock. My regiment advanced through a thick patch of
briers and then through an open field, while a battery of the enemy over
the crest of a hill on my left played upon the troops advancing
on my right. I was halted in a skirt of woods by the battery, and was
immediately ordered to charge and take it. I threw my regiment into
column by division, left in front, preparatory to making the charge, but
the regiment on my right having fallen back, I was ordered to wheel into
line and engage the advancing foe. I did so, and the enemy were
repulsed. I then advanced about 300 yards, when I was informed by
Lieut. A. Adjutant that I was flanked on my left. I sent him to report
it to Gen. Wood. The general ordered that I change my front and
engage the flankers. I did so promptly, and fired for about twenty-five
or thirty minutes. The enemy being protected by a hill and skirt of
woods in his front, I was ordered to charge. I did so, and the enemy
was driven from the field with considerable loss. I was then ordered to
charge a battery in front. I communicated this to my men. They
advanced firmly and steadily under a galling fire from the supporters off
the battery. I drove the enemy back and took and held the battery.

At this time my ammunition gave out, and I had to retire to obtain a
new supply. I was then separated from the brigade; but being desirous
that my regiment should assist in driving the ruthless invader from our
sacred soil, I advanced to a position on the right, of where I had just
engaged the enemy. While advancing through a thicket of underwood I
suddenly came upon a masked battery directly in front and supported by
a large force. Being overpowered, I was compelled to retreat. The
retreat, however, was conducted in good order, and I awaited the arrival
of Col. Shaver, commanding Gen. Hindman's brigade, and
formed upon the right of Col. McKoin's, who also joined Col.
Shaver and advanced with him until he engaged the enemy, and I was
separated from his command. Thinking I did not have sufficient force
to engage the enemy, I took position in the rear to await orders to join
some command.

Soon I was ordered by Lieut. L. A. McClung to go as a guard with
Federal prisoners just taken. I guarded them 5 miles, and was relieved
on the morning of the 7th instant, and ordered back by Gen. Wood
to the battle field to rejoin him on the left. On my way Gen.
Cheatham's aide-de-camp came to me and reported that they were
flanked on the right and the general ordered me to that position. He
urged the necessity of the case in such strong terms that I obeyed his
order. I took position and fired upon the enemy a few moments, when
a charge was ordered. My regiment charged with Gen. Cheatham's
command, and the enemy was driven back. A flank movement on the
right compelled our troops to retire from the field. I halted, after
retreating about 300 yards, formed my regiment, and engaged the enemy
again until an overwhelming force flanked me on the right and forced
me to retreat. This was the last of the engagement in which my regiment
participated.

Gen., I must say, in conclusion, that my men fought gallantly,
bravely, and with a determination that insures certain victory. They
stood firm and fought like veterans to the last. I was greatly assisted by
Maj. Helvenston on the right, and I am indebted to him for many noble
acts of daring and intrepidity-always at his post and at all times cheering
on the soldiers. While gallantly charging a battery, at the head of the
column, he received a wound in the left thigh, which disabled him for
the remained of the day. His horse fell under him at the same time.

Capt. Ashford, Company B, also acted nobly. At one time, when our
forces were driven back, one piece of a battery was left by the gunners
and drivers, the lead horse having been shot; Capt. Ashford
went to the piece, under the enemy's fire, cut the traces of the dead
horse, ordered two men near by to assist him, and drove it away,
preventing its capture by the enemy.

Lieut. William A. Patton, Company C, while at his post and
encouraging his men to their duty, fell, facing the foe. His untimely fate
is deeply deplored.

Respectfully,

J. W. HARRIS,
Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Sixteenth Regt. Alabama Vols.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

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Stone's River after battle report:

Report of Col. William B. Wood, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry,
including skirmish at Triune, December 27.

- -, 1863.

CAPT.: In pursuance of the order to report the movements and
operations of this regiment in the battles at Triune and
Murfreesborough, on the 27th and 31st ultimo, I beg to submit the
following:

On the 26th ultimo we were ordered to the front of Triune, to support
Gen. Wharton and repel the advance of the enemy, who was reported
to be moving in that direction with a large force. We remained under
arms until late in the evening, when we were ordered to return and
strike our camps, send the wagons to the rear, and take position on the
hill near the Franklin pike.

At 4 o'clock on the 27th we were under arms and moved forward to
take position on the hills in front of Triune. We remained in that
position, deployed as skirmishers, until 9 o'clock, when we were ordered
back to our position in rear of the town. My regiment was deployed as
skirmishers just behind brow of the hill and awaited the approach of the
enemy. Capt. Darden occupied the hill with his battery. The enemy
an attempt to turn our left flank with cavalry, which was repulsed by the
artillery and my skirmishers on the left, the enemy fleeing in confusion.
About 1 o'clock a heavy rain commenced and continued for nearly an
hour. As soon as it ceased, and we were able to see a few hundred
yards to the front, we discovered the enemy advanced nearly up to our
lines. We immediately opened fire upon him and held him in check until
the artillery was drawn off, when we were ordered to fall back. As we
were retreating, I discovered the enemy moving up on our right flank,
but we were enabled to gain the turn in the road before they could cut
us off. A piece of artillery opened on them from this point and checked
their advance. Our lines was then formed on the pike and brought off
without loss. Our casualties were 2 men slightly wounded.

We reached Murfreesborough Sunday night, and Monday morning were
ordered to take position in the line of battle on the right wing near the
Lebanon pike. We remained in this position until Tuesday night, when
we were ordered across the river and bivouacked for the night on the
river bank in an open field.

At daylight on the morning of the 31st, we were in line of battle and
moved forward across the field. Before we had advanced 100 yards the
enemy opened upon us with shells. Our line was pushed forward across
the fields to the woods, where we discovered the enemy in a dense
cedar glade, lying down behind the rocks. We commenced firing as
soon as the skirmishers fell back, and continued firing for nearly half an
hour, neither party yielding any ground. The general gave the order to
"charge," and the men, with a yell, made a charge in gallant style,
dislodging the enemy form their strong position and killing scores of
them as they fled. We continued to push on for more than half a mile,
when we came upon another line of the enemy. Again a fierce and
stubborn resistance was made. Again the general ordered a charge,
which was made with like results, the enemy being driven for more than
half a mile until they fell behind a battery planted near a large frame
house used as a hospital. Our line was reformed, and, with Gen.
Polk's brigade, moved up to charge the battery. As we approached, a
few rounds were fired, and the battery was drawn off. We pursued as
rapidly a possible, driving the enemy through the woods, across a
corn-field, and beyond the Nolensville pike. As we approached the field
another battery to our right opened upon us. We charged across this
open field more than a quarter of mile to capture the battery. About the
time we reached another house used as a hospital, another battery
(planted on the pike) opened a cross-fire upon us, and at the same time
a heavy infantry force, supporting the battery, opened its fire. Our
ammunition here gave out, and we were compelled to fall back to the
woods to obtain a supply. It was now about 11 o'clock. Our line was
again formed and moved forward across the pike and into the woods,
where we again encountered
the enemy and opened fire upon him. We continued to move forward
and charge them whenever they made a stand, until they were driven
nearly 2 miles. The fighting in the afternoon continued for about three
hours. Our ammunition being again exhausted, we fell back out of the
reach of the enemy's guns and obtained da fresh supply. The fighting
now ceased on the left wing, and night soon coming on we bivouacked
on the field.

The morning of [January] 1 we moved to our position and remained in
it until the afternoon, when we were moved forward to make a
reconnaissance of the position of the enemy. Being found in large force
and our position very much exposed to the enemy's artillery, we were
ordered back to our original position.

We were again in line of battle on the morning of the 2d, and remained
so all day without any engagement with the enemy. That night we were
ordered to recross the river and occupy our formed position on the right
wing, which we did, and remained there until 11 o'clock that night,
when ordered on the retreat.

I lost in the battle of the 31st ultimo 24 killed, of whom 4 were
lieutenants, and 142 wounded, among whom were Lieut.-Col.
Helvenston, Maj. [J. H.] McGaughy, and Adjutant [B. A.] Wilson, and
6 lieutenants. A list* of the killed and wounded is herewith forwarded.

My regiment encountered the One hundred and first Ohio Regiment,
commanded by Col. [Leander] Stem, at the beginning of the fight.
We wounded and captured the colonel and killed the
lieutenant-colonel. We next fought the Twenty-fifth [Thirty-eighth] and
Twenty-first Illinois, and Eighty-first Indiana, and Fifteenth Wisconsin
Regiments, killing and wounding a number of the officers and men.

I feel proud in being able to report that most of my officers and men
behaved with signal courage and unflinching bravery during the whole
action. There were some instances of peculiar gallantry displayed which
came under my notice, and no doubt others equally creditable occurred
which I may not have observed. I mention Adjt. B. A. Wilson, who, after
Lieut.-Col. Helvenston and Maj. McGuarghy were wounded,
rendered efficient services in leading the left wing of the regiment in
the charges which were made, until he fell, severely wounded.
Serg. Maj. Robert [H.] Cherry, finding Company I without an officer
during the action, assumed command, and gallantly led them through the
fight. Private Harvey G. Sergeant, of Company H, is reported as having
behaved very gallantly; he lost an arm, and deserves promotion.
Privates William Boyce and James Peeden, of Company C;
Color-Sergt.[William] Drury Bowen, of Company H;
Serg. H. W. Rutland, of Company A; Private Peter White, of Company
F, and Private Robert Williams, of Company B, acted with courage and
bravery. Private H. D. Smith, of Company A, received a wound in one
leg, but contained on the field, fighting, until he was wounded in the
other leg. He is a young man deserving consideration.

Among the officers who displayed signal gallantry I noticed Capt.
[William] Hodges, of Company F; Lieut. [C.] Davis, of Company
B; Lieut. [G. W. W.] Jones, of Company G; Lieut. [G.] Pride,
of Company A, and Lieut. [C. F.] Carson, of Company C, who
remained on the field after was wounded; Lieut. [T. J.] Salter, of
Company D, who was wounded and left the field, had his wound
dressed, returned again to his duties, and remained until compelled by
suffering to leave. Lieut.'s [D. W.] Alexander and [D. C.] Warren,
of Company F,
were with their command from the beginning to the end of the battle.
Lieut.'s [William S.] Humphries and [J. N.] Watson, of Company K,
were also with their command throughout the whole engagement. The
gallant dead and wounded fully discharged their duties until they fell.

I mention with pleasure the efficient services of Capt. T. A. Kimball,
chaplain of the regiment, who took charge of the infirmary corps, and
followed close behind the regiment, removing the wounded as soon as
they fell, himself dressing many of the wounds.

Surg. F. S. McMahon and Assistant Surgeon [William M.] Mayes were
at their posts, discharging their duties faithfully, promptly, and
efficiently.

Respectfully submitted.

W. B. WOOD,
Col., Cmdg. Sixteenth Alabama Regt.

[Capt.] O. S. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXII.] THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN. PAGE 901-29
[Series I. Vol. 20. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 29.]

****************************************************************************************
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and other relevant information about the 16th Alabama Infantry in the Regimental Histories Forum. Please do not start new threads - just add your content under this existing thread so it can be easily located. Thank you so much for contributing information about the 16th Alabama Infantry.
8639371.jpg

16th Alabama Volunteer Infantry
Organized at Courtland, AL
Mustered in August 6, 1861
Surrendered at Goldsboro, NC April 26, 1865

Assignments:
Zollicoffer's Brigade/Crittenden's Dept of East TN
SAM Wood's Brigade/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Simon Bolivar Buckner's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/D H Hill's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Cheatham's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Shelley's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee

Companies, Counties from which they were recruited, original Captains.
COMPANY A. - Franklin County; Capt John H. McGaughey
COMPANY B. - Lawrence County; Capt Frederick A. Ashford (became Col)
COMPANY C. - Lauderdale County; Capt. Alexander D. Coffee
COMPANY D. - Conecuh County; Capt. J. J. May (became Lt Col)
COMPANY E. - Franklin County; Capt. W. W. Weatherford
COMPANY F. - Lawrence County; Capt. William Hodges
COMPANY G. - Marion County; Capt. A. H. Helvenston
COMPANY H. - Franklin County; Capt. John W. Harris, Jr., (became Lt Col)
COMPANY I. - Lawrence County; Capt. William S. Bankhead
COMPANY K. - Marion County, Capt. the Rev. William Powers

The Sixteenth Alabama Infantry was organized at Courtland, August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.
http://www.archives.alabama.gov/referenc/alamilor/16thinf.html

Complete Historical Sketch/Regimental History located here http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Capt. Frederick A. Ashford, Sixteenth Alabama
Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ALABAMA REGT.,
October 8, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to forward the following report of the part
taken by my command in the battle of Chickamauga on
September 19 and 20:

At about 5 o'clock on the evening of September 19, the Sixteenth
Alabama Regt., with 32 officers and 382 effective men Maj.
John H. McGaughy commanding, being a part of Wood's
brigade, was formed, in line of battle as the left center regiment
of that brigade, the Forty-fifth and Thirty-third Alabama Regt.'s
being on the right and left, respectively. As soon as the line of
battle was formed, each regiment was ordered to throw forward
a company of skirmishers of sufficient strength to cover its
front. As soon as our skirmishers had been deployed, we were
ordered to advance with a caution from officers of Gen. Wood's
staff that a part of Liddell's division was in our front, and that
we would pass them lying in line of battle before we
commenced firing. We moved forward with our skirmishers
about 100 yards in our front, who soon encountered the
skirmishers of the enemy and drove them back. Still expecting to
pass a line of our own men, we withheld our fire until we had
advanced close on the enemy's line of battle, when passing our
skirmishers, we charged their line, our right wing closing with
them, capturing about 40 prisoners and driving them back, and
after a severe struggle for a few minutes longer on our left, we
drove back in confusion their whole line in our front.

About this time Maj. McGaughy gave the command to "march
in retreat." which was obeyed in bad order, the regiment
retreating in confusion to where Jackson's brigade was lying in
line of battle, where it rallied, forming first on the right of this
brigade and then dressing on the Forty-fifth [Alabama] Regt. I
then asked Maj. McGaughy why he gave the order to retreat. He
replied that the Forty-fifth Alabama Regt., the battalion of
direction was falling back and that he had been ordered to be
guided by the movements of that regiment. As soon as the men
had been rallied and formed, Maj. McGaughy again gave the
command to advance, when we moved forward to the position
from which we had first driven the enemy, and, re-entering the
fight, after an engagement for half an hour, were left in
possession of the field.

I will here state that Companies E and G acted badly, except
First Lieut. Guy, Sergeant Jennings, and 2 or 3 privates from
Company E, and First Lieut. Jones and Second Lieut. Stanley
and a few privates from Company G, who remained with the
regiment until the close of the fight. Lieut. Roberts, Corporal
Armstrong, and Privates Curry and Jones, of Company D, left
he field and did not return until Monday (21st) after the battle.
Capt. Archer, Company G, while in my presence made no effort
to rally his men when ordered to halt, but led them in the
retreat. I attribute the confusion in our retreat to a want of the
proper command over their men on the part of the officers of
Companies E and G; to the darkness of the night; to the failure
of the left wing to hear the command "retreat", they believing
that the right wing was being driven back, and to the fact that
just previous to receiving the order to retreat our line was fired
into several times from the rear. After moving forward the
second time, our left was subjected to a heavy enfilading fire and
suffered heavy loss from the enemy, who was posted behind
breastworks of logs to our left.

In the last attack both officers and men discharged their duties
gallantly, never for a moment faltering until the enemy had been
driven from the field. This being accomplished, we advanced a
short distance and were ordered to send out a company of
skirmishers as a picket guard and encamp as we were for the
night.

It is due the officers and men who failed to return and participate
in the second engagement to say that they were formed, looking
for
the command, before the firing ceased, but owing to the
darkness of the night failed to come up in time. It is also due
Lieut. Cox, Company E, to state that he was on detailed duty on
September 19.

In the morning of September 20, the regiment, with an effective
strength of 28 officers and 257 men, Maj. McGaughy still
commanding, was, as had been ordered, under arms at 4 o'clock,
and os remained until about 10 o'clock, when we were ordered
forward and advanced nearly a mile and within a short distance
of the enemy, who held a very strong position and were
protected by breastworks built of logs. Here we were ordered to
lie down, and remained an hour under a heavy fire of shell,
grape, and canister shot. When moved from this position we
advanced about 200 yards through open woods, and then about
125 yard through an old field covered with a small undergrowth,
to the edge of an open field in front of and about 150 yards
distant form the enemy's works. Here we commenced firing, and
continued to fire for at least and hour before I discord that we
had no regiment on our right and could see none on our left, and
that, so far as I could ascertain, ours was the only regiment that
had advanced as far as the open field.

About this time the Fifteenth Tennessee Regt. came up form the
rear to our assistance, when we again commenced advancing; but
this regiment, firing one volley, retired from the field, leaving
its flag behind, the color bearer having been killed. Private J. J.
Alexander, Company H, of this regiment, went out under a
heavy fire recovered, and brought off the flag, and, when this
regiment fell back, returned it to them. After the Fifteenth
Tennessee left us we remained about half an hour, when, finding
that we were supported neither in flank nor rear, and that over
two-thirds of my men had already fallen, and seeing that the
enemy was preparing to advance upon me, I withdrew (Maj.
McGaughy having fallen) what remained of the regiment and fell
back to the line from which we advanced in the morning, where
I found the rest of Wood's brigade and formed with it. The
brigade being formed, we again advanced to the support of
Polk's brigade, which was then engaging the enemy, but were
not again in the fight.

I am proud to say that in the engagement on Sunday (20th) there
was no confusion in the regiment, and that both officers and men
(with the exceptions hereafter reported), though subjected to
almost galling fire from both artillery and small-arms, behaved
in the most gallant manner, several receiving as many as four
and five wounds before leaving the field; others, after having
fired their last round of ammunition, remained in line until
ordered to retreat. Capt. Archer, Company G, and Sergeant
Scruggs, Company I, failed to go into the engagement on
Sunday, and were absent from their companies until after the
close of the battle.

I would be pleased to mention several officers and men who
behaved with distinguished gallantry, but cannot do so without
possibly neglecting some, and will close by saying that the
regiment, both officers and men (with above-mentioned
exceptions), gave the most perfect satisfaction, and, under the
circumstances, did all that men could do.

In our loss of 25 killed and 218 wounded is embraced the loss of
several of our most gallant and chivalrous officers and the best
soldiers of the regiment.

In this connection, I may be permitted to allude particularly to
the noble bearing and fearlessness in discharge of duty of First
Lieut.
Isaac C. Madding, Company B; Second Lieut. Robert H.
Cherry, Company I, First Lieut. G. W. W. Jones, Company G;
Second Lieut. John D. Oglesby, Company F, and our gallant
commander, Maj. J. H. McGaughy, all of whom (except the last
mentioned, who lies dangerously wounded) fill patriots' graves
on the banks of the Chickamauga.

Respectfully, &c., your obedient servant.

F. A. ASHFORD,
Capt., Comdg. Regt.

Capt. O. S. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLII.] THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN. PAGE 162-51
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]

*************************************************************************************

Report of Maj. Frederick A. Ashford, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ALABAMA REGIMENT,
Tunnel Hill, Ga., December 2, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to report that, on the morning of the 27th ultimo
at 7 o'clock, my command was detached from Lowrey's brigade,
of which if formed a part, and was posted on an elevated point to the
left of and resting on the road leading from Tunnel Hill to Ringgold,
which position I was ordered to hold. The enemy advanced to the
suburbs of the town (Ringgold) nearest my position, threw forward a
line of skirmishers, and opened a brisk fire upon a battery which was
firing upon them from them mouth of the gap. I ordered forward a
company of skirmishers, which soon drove them from their position,
without sustaining any loss. As soon as the engagement became general
on my right, I advanced two more lines of skirmishers and moved the
remainder of my command over the crest of the hill, as if intending to
attack, endeavoring, if possible, to create a diversion in that direction.
But the enemy failed to attack, and my command was not further
engaged during the battle of the 27th ultimo.

Respectfully, &c., your obedient servant,

F. A. ASHFORD,
Maj., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. O. S. PALMER,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 769-55 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA, AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLIII.
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 55.]
 

lelliott19

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Brigadier General Sterling Alexander Martin (SAM) Wood and Staff @ 1862/63 with ID's
BrigGen_SAM Wood and staff 1.jpg

Original photo from Alabama Dept of Archives & History; this cleaned up and flipped version courtesy of @Mike Serpa
Seated L-R
1) Brig Genl Sterling Alexander Martin (S.A.M.) Wood
2) Henry Clay Wood, Aide-de-camp (and brother of BG SAM Wood)
Standing L-R
1) Martin Vanburen Walt Asst QM (promoted Apr 24, 1863, to QM with rank of Maj, to rank Oct 14, 1862)
2) Rev. Alexander Lockett Hamilton, Chaplain & Acting QM
3) Dr William Cordwell Cross, Brigade Surgeon (my gg grandfather)
 
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Mike Serpa

Major
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Brigadier General Sterling Alexander Martin (SAM) Wood and Staff @ 1862/63 with ID's
View attachment 120775
Original photo from Alabama Dept of Archives & History; this cleaned up and flipped version courtesy of @Mike Serpa
Seated L-R
1) Brig Genl Sterling Alexander Martin (S.A.M.) Wood
2) Henry Clay Wood, Aide-de-camp (and brother of BG SAM Wood)
Standing L-R
1) Martin Vanburen Walt Asst QM (promoted Apr 24, 1863, to QM with rank of Maj, to rank Oct 14, 1862)
2) Rev. Alexander Lockett Hamilton, Chaplain & Acting QM
3) Dr William Cordwell Cross, Brigade Surgeon (my gg grandfather)
How did you find the ID with Hamilton? Alabama Archives gave three possible IDs and none are the one you came up with. (Or did I miss it in a different thread?)
 

AUG

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Location
Texas
A few members of the 16th:

49897085_614998612286418_7316468198801408000_o.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-dfw5-1.jpg

Maj. John H. McGaughey, Company A, 16th Alabama Infantry. McGaughey enlisted on July 11, 1861, in Cherokee, Alabama, as Captain of Company A (aka "Cherokee Greys," "Pope Walker Greys," or "Sons of Dixie"). He was wounded at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6, 1862, where "he received a fearful wound on the first volley which the enemy fired." He was wounded a second time at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Dec. 31, 1862, suffering a flesh wound to the thigh and also being captured. At the Battle of Chickamauga in September 1863, McGaughey was acting commander of the regiment. He was mortally wounded on Sept. 20, 1863, and later dying on Oct. 7, 1863.
https://www.facebook.com/341482969637985/photos/a.346787729107509/614998608953085/?type=3&theater

52945569_641254022994210_1671469467646820352_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_ht=scontent-dfw5-1.jpg

Capt. Fortunatus S. McMahon, Surgeon, 16th Alabama Infantry. From Courtland, Lawrence County, Alabama, he enlisted on Sept. 5, 1861, and was appointed Assistant Surgeon. He was promoted to Surgeon on Aug. 23, 1862, and served throughout the rest of the war in Cleburne's Division.
https://www.facebook.com/341482969637985/photos/a.346787729107509/641254016327544/?type=3&theater

2nd Lt. John Hollis Bankhead, Co. K, 16th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Capt. John Hollis Bankhead, Company K.

Description from Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Alabama in the Civil War by Ben H. Severance:

After "seeing the elephant" at Shiloh and Murfreesboro, Capt. John Bankhead of the 16th Alabama Infantry might have thought nothing could exceed the horror of those battles. Chickamauga proved otherwise. The twenty-one-year-old son of a planter from Marion County, whose family ancestry was steeped in Revolutionary War heritage, Bankhead enlisted without hesitation shortly after the outbreak of hostilities. In April 1862 he assumed command of Company K. At dusk on 19 September, Captain Bankhead entered the already raging battle of Chickamauga; Company K aligned on the left side of the regiment, which itself composed the left center of Wood's Brigade. Groping forward in the diminishing sunlight, the 16th was still crossing Winfrey Field when Union musketry erupted. The Alabamians charged and seemed poised to overrun the enemy position. Unfortunately, confusion ensued when the regimental commander shouted an ambiguous order to "march in retreat." Bankhead and a couple of other captains ignored it long enough to bag a few dozen prisoners before falling back. After rallying, the unit returned to the fight and helped secure the field.​
Late the following morning, the 16th Alabama participated in a general attack on strongly entrenched Union forces near the Brotherton Farmhouse. Under a seemingly incessant barrage of artillery, the regiment slowly closed in on the bluecoat lines, the Alabamians alternating maneuver with long periods of volley fire. Around 1:00 P.M. Bankhead led his company in a perfunctory charge across a stretch of road, but after suffering 240 casualties in two days of fighting, the regiment was too weak to exploit the meager gains. Bankhead, with one of his arms broken by a shell fragment, withdrew his exhausted command toward cover. On the way he noticed a wounded private lying dangerously close to a rapidly burning section of the battlefield. With his one good arm, Bankhead hoisted the man onto his back and carried him to safety.​
After recovering from his wound, John Bankhead resumed command of Company K, 16th Alabama. At the Battle of Atlanta on 22 July 1864, he was again wounded but again recovered and led the company until the end of the war. Bankhead became an active Democrat after the war, serving in the state legislature in the 1860s and 1870s. During Reconstruction, he was a member of the Ku Klux Klan. After a successful tenure as warden of the state penitentiary, Bankhead won election to the U.S. House in 1887, a seat he held until moving to the U.S. Senate in 1907. Bankhead died in 1920.​


2nd-lt-benjamin-hudson-russell-co-h-16th-alabama-infantry-jpg.jpg

2nd Lt. Benjamin Hudson Russell, Company H "Russell Valley War Hornets." Killed at Murfreesboro, Dec. 31, 1862.

Private Thomas P. Lamkin, Co. F, 16th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Private Thomas P. Lamkin, Company F.
More photos of Lamkin here: http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/search/collection/photo/searchterm/Lamkin

Private Marion Overton, Co. E, 16th Alabama Infantry.jpg

Private Marion Overton, Company E.

16alacogwadehuffmant.jpg

Private Wade A. Huffman, Company G.

3cfebe5521998a8c89d114b9d15d0d86.jpg

Private John Leonard Weeks, Company K.
More info on Pvt. Weeks here: http://www.civil-war.net/users/john_weeks/john_weeks.asp


Edit to add: many other photos here:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/Alabama...85/photos/?tab=album&album_id=346787729107509
 
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lelliott19

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And my favorite....
Capt James Washington Clark Smith Co H.jpg

Captain James Washington Clark Smith, Co H
Photo from http://freepages.military.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~alavols33rd/jwcsmith.htm

James W C Smith was born April 24, 1837 in Newburg, Franklin County, AL. His parents were Rev. James Smith and Nancy Mullins Smith. He enlisted in the 16th Alabama Infantry at Tuscumbia, AL on July 15, 1861 as a 1st Lieutenant at the age of 24. On Aug 15, 1861, he was promoted to Captain Co. H at Camp Beech. Smith was in the Cleveland train wreck sustaining injuries to his face and head. He rejoined his command April 2, 1864 and retired August 1, 1864.

COMPANY H. - From Franklin county, was raised by Lieutenant Colonel John W. Harris, Jr., who was its first captain. He was succeeded as captain by First Lieutenant James Washington Clark Smith, who after the battle of Perryville, was seriously injured in a railroad collision at Cleveland, Tenn., and resigned. Lieutenant John Bean, son of Col. Dillion Bean, of Lawrence county, succeeded him as captain. Indeed, there were many Lawrence men in Company H. Captain Bean commanded the company to the end of the war. The captain was a brave officer, and did not disgrace his descent from the early Indian fighters of East Tennessee. John Hurst was a lieutenant and a good officer. He was terribly wounded at Chickamauga, but recovered and returned to his duty. John White became a lieutenant in 1863.
http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm
 
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lelliott19

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upload_2017-6-15_23-32-11.png
upload_2017-6-15_23-32-51.png

Head Quarters 16th Ala Regt
Corinth Miss March 24th 1862
Maj Gen A S Johnston
Comd Dep of the West

General:
We, the undersigned, field officers of the Regiment, being informed that most of the troops now enlisting for the war, are being armed with Enfield Rifles, respectfully Req leave to state, that our Regiment originally entered the service for three years, and we would ____? it as a favor, if we also could be supplied with the same weapon.
The arms with which we are now furnished, are of a mixed character, viz. H. F.
(Harpers Ferry) Muskets - a few Springfield Muskets, and the Old US Rifles - the latter without bayonets - nor have we a sufficiency of all to furnish the whole Regiment.
The whole number of our enlisted men is Seven Hundred and eighty eight (788) For duty (367)
Respectfully,
Yr obt srvt
J
(John) W Harris Lt Col
Comd 16th Ala Regt
J H Helvenston
Major 16th Ala Regt


Endorsements on reverse:
Respectfully forwarded with a special request that this favor may be granted if in the power of the General Commanding the Department.
S. A. M.
(Sterling Alexander Martin) Wood
Brigdr Genl
Commdg 3 Div *

*(The squiggly mark looks like a Ca but SAM Wood was commanding a Division of Infantry so not sure what that is)

26 March 62
Approved AS Johnston
General CSofA
make requisition for 367 Enfield Rifles

Approved March 27, 1862
upload_2017-6-15_23-31-18.png


EDIT TO ADD: Looks like Johnston's "favor" was carried out fairly quickly. I do not yet know if the Enfield rifles were in the hands of the regiment prior to Shiloh, but they definitely were by May 9, 1862 - on that date, Captain Joseph J May of Co D requisitioned "10,000 Cartridges for Enfield Rifle and 15,000 Musket Caps for same" and signs as Commanding the regt. The Ordinance Officer signed as received.
Fold3_Enfield Rifles for 16th AL.jpg
 
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lelliott19

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@lelliott19 do you have any record or accounts of them getting those enfields?
I've got the Enfields in the hands of the Regiment April 1864. Still looking for an earlier record. I will post here, the earliest record I can find. EDIT TO ADD: Posted above a requisition dated May 9, 1862, for cartridges and caps and below a receipt of the Ordnance Officer for 61 Enfield rifles dated May 7 1862 - which is the earliest reference I have found to the Enfields.

MISSING FLAG - Lt Isaac Madding
In the meantime, here's a very interesting document I ran across while looking. Although the communication is undated, the taking of the Flag referenced therein, undoubtedly occurred at the Battle of Shiloh. Lt Isaac Madding's brother, Pvt Richard F Madding was wounded at Shiloh and died on May 10, 1862. Lt Isaac Madding was killed at Chickamauga.

Since it is very hard to read, Ill post my best attempt at a transcription.
Head Qrs 16th Ala Vols
Genl S. A. M.
[Sterling Alexander Martin] Wood
Lieutenant I
[Isaac] C Madding having received special permission to attend to his brother [Richard F Madding] - badly wounded - after charging the Battery, carried him into a Tent where he obtained a Flag belonging to the Enemy. which has since been sent to Courtland [AL] by him. It will be returned "if ordered" (struck through) to Head Qrs as soon as it can be brought back from the home of the Lieut taking it.
I am Sir
Very Respectfully
Yr Obt Servt
A
[Alexander] D Coffee Capt
Comd'g 16th Regt Ala Vols
Fold3_Flag Captured 16th Alabama.jpg
 
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16thAL

Sergeant
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Location
Corinth MS
I found my great great uncles name listed on the surname list but cant hardly find anything else out about him so if anyone has any information on George W. Tims i would greatly appreciate anything, i do know he was a roll of honor recipient and all the list says was KIA. He was killed at chickamauga on the 20th.
 

Tim Holcomb

Cadet
Joined
Sep 27, 2017
View attachment 303633
16th Alabama Volunteer Infantry
Organized at Courtland, AL
Mustered in August 6, 1861
Surrendered at Goldsboro, NC April 26, 1865

Assignments:
Zollicoffer's Brigade/Crittenden's Dept of East TN
SAM Wood's Brigade/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Simon Bolivar Buckner's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of the Mississippi
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
SAM Wood's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/D H Hill's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Hardee's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Cleburne's Division/Cheatham's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Lowrey's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee
Shelley's Brigade/Loring's Division/Stewart's Corps/Army of Tennessee

Companies, Counties from which they were recruited, original Captains.
COMPANY A. - Franklin County; Capt John H. McGaughey
COMPANY B. - Lawrence County; Capt Frederick A. Ashford (became Col)
COMPANY C. - Lauderdale County; Capt. Alexander D. Coffee
COMPANY D. - Conecuh County; Capt. J. J. May (became Lt Col)
COMPANY E. - Franklin County; Capt. W. W. Weatherford
COMPANY F. - Lawrence County; Capt. William Hodges
COMPANY G. - Marion County; Capt. A. H. Helvenston
COMPANY H. - Franklin County; Capt. John W. Harris, Jr., (became Lt Col)
COMPANY I. - Lawrence County; Capt. William S. Bankhead
COMPANY K. - Marion County, Capt. the Rev. William Powers

The Sixteenth (Alabama Infantry) was organized at Courtland, (AL) August 6, 1861. Ordered to Knoxville, it was there placed in Gen. Zollikoffer's brigade. Under that commander it fought at Fishing Creek, and lost 64 men there. Transferred to another field of operations, and placed in the brigade of Gen. Wood of Lauderdale - with the 33rd Alabama, 44th Tennessee, and 32nd and 33rd of Mississippi - it was very warmly engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 162 men. As part of Buckner's division, it moved into Kentucky, and was held in the reserve at Perryville, and not actively engaged. The Sixteenth participated in the affair at Triune with slight loss; and was in the thickest of the battle of Murfreesboro, where its loss was 168 killed and wounded. The regiment remained in the vicinity of Tullahoma till the army of Tennessee fell back to Chattanooga. At Chicamauga it was in Cleburne's division, and its colors floated "in the van of chivalric men" in that fierce grapple with a courageous foe, and its loss was 244 killed and wounded. From the disaster at Mission Ridge the Sixteenth retired with trivial loss, and wintered at Dalton. Gen. Mark Lowery of Mississippi was now in command of the brigade, to which the Forty-fifth Alabama and Gibson's Battalion were soon added. From Dalton to Atlanta the Sixteenth bore an honorable share in the wonderful retrograde movement of the Western Army, fighting by day and entrenching by night, and its casualties were 200 in number. On that field of blood, Jonesboro, the Sixteenth left about 150 of its men, and was an actor in the other scenes of the fearful drama around Atlanta. It moved with Hood into Tennessee, and in the fruitless and sanguinary struggles at Franklin and Nashville lost half its remaining force, and every commissioned officer. A remnant followed the march of the army into the Carolinas, and surrendered at Goldsboro, about 50 men being present. It had been consolidated with the 1st and 45th Alabama regiments.
Complete Historical Sketch/Regimental History located here http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm

This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and other relevant information about the 16th Alabama Infantry in the Regimental Histories Forum. Please do not start new threads - just add your content under this existing thread so it can be easily located. Thank you so much for contributing information about the 16th Alabama Infantry.
Hi Laura
I wanted to respond to this one since I have been reading about the 16th Alabama Infantry since we discovered that your GGGF Dr. Cross and my GGF Dr. John H Holcomb may have crossed paths in Tupelo Mississippi in the summer of 1862, just prior to the movement of General Bragg's forces out of Tupelo in late July 1682 on the long train journey east to the Perryville campaign and to Chattanooga. I know my GGF was there from about May 1862 as the 23rd ARkansas infantry was reorganized in Camp Priceville at Tupelo in May 1862 and then again in Saltillo MS in 9/1862, just prior to the second battle of Corinth. I remembered that Dr. Cross was sent to the Corinth area right after Shiloh battle to help care for the wounded. When the siege of Corinth began in late April 1862, then most forces relocated to the Tupelo area. I think around 30,000 of Bragg's troops began movement around 7/23/1862 eastward and began to arrive there in 7/27. Many were so fatigued with this trip that not available for battle right away. Anyway it is fun to think that they may have crossed paths there. What do you think of this theory? Tim
 
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