1000 Love Letters!

connecticut yankee

First Sergeant
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Jun 2, 2017
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During the Civil War, newly enlisted Army surgeon Dr. Bowman Bigelow Breed and his wife Hannah, vowed to write to each other every day, “if only a line.” And they kept their promise...


 
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John Hartwell

Major
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Aug 27, 2011
Location
Central Massachusetts
Very interesting to see the full story of this extraordinary correspondence,

We've seen a little of Dr. Breed here at CWT:
 
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DBF

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 6, 2016
What a romantic:

“The pleasantest hour of the day is that which brings about dusk your ever welcome letter,” Bowman wrote in late June 1861 from Camp Essex outside Baltimore. “The touch of the hand in tracing the lines seems to leave a sort of electricity on the paper which pervades it always.”

They certainly lived through many heartbreaks and I was happy to see that in the end life was blessed for them with healthy children.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
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During the Civil War, newly enlisted Army surgeon Dr. Bowman Bigelow Breed and his wife Hannah, vowed to write to each other every day, “if only a line.” And they kept their promise...


That was hard to read in some ways, with one child after another after another dying. Their deaths seemed unexplained and in some ways sudden, too. Poor Hannah. She must have been so bereft on those occasions when her husband was not by her side.

These are some of my favorite lines from the article:

The mails were remarkably fast and regular then, even in wartime. Letters sometimes arrived the next day — but for Hannah and Bowman, that often wasn’t quick enough.

“Oh it is hard to be thus separated. Life is not life, living thus,” she wrote.

After one silence, he lamented, “Oh darling these leaden footed hours, when will they bring you to my heart and arms.”

Each seemed to live for the postman’s arrival, delivering their “daily chat.”

“The pleasantest hour of the day is that which brings about dusk your ever welcome letter,” Bowman wrote in late June 1861 from Camp Essex outside Baltimore. “The touch of the hand in tracing the lines seems to leave a sort of electricity on the paper which pervades it always.”

Deeply religious, they ended most letters with a “God bless you.”
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
During my Navy career, we were on long-term (6 months or more) separations for about 46 months. My wife and I wrote about every third day -- always complete letters and each in its own envelope. When I retired, I reviewed that stack of letters and decided that it was our life on display. We had not agreed to write with the possibility that others would ever read the letters, so they were clear, frank, raw and intimate -- sometimes with meanings that only we could know. I decided to retain the privacy we had when we wrote them and destroyed all but about a dozen special ones. Some things are private when created and should remain that way.
 
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