Discussion Your favorite quotes of the civil war..

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

BronxYankee

Private
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
"I make up my opinions from facts and reasoning, and not to suit any body but myself. If people don't like my opinions, it makes little difference as I don't solicit their opinions or votes." ~ William Tecumseh Sherman
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Polloco

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Not exactly a quote but Hancock was referred to as "the profanest man in an army of profane men". I would very much like to read some of his quotes. I assume they would be unprintable here.

John
He very well could have been on the North side but I heard that title could also pertain to Jubal Early on the other side. Or was it Ewell? One if them southern generals was the opposite of Lee when it came to profanity.
 

jackt62

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
"They removed me from command because I couldn't keep Forrest out of West Tennessee . . . and now Washburn can't keep him out of his own bedroom."

Union general Stephen Hurlbut's sarcastic comment on General NB Forrest's successful August 21, 1864 raid on the Union garrison in Memphis, TN commanded by General CC Washburn.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

jackt62

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
"Why in the nation, General Marcy, couldn't the general have known whether a boat would go through the lock before spending a million dollars getting them there? I am no engineer, but it seems to me that if I wished to know whether a boat would go through a hole, or a lock, common sense would teach me to go and measure it."

President Lincoln's exasperation at learning the General McClellan's plan to construct a temporary bridge in February 1862 near Harpers Ferry had been stymied when the bridge sections (floated on barges up the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal), were too wide to fit through the canal locks. (Marcy was McClellan's Chief of Staff and McClellan's father in law).
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Ara Oko

Private
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Not exactly a quote but Hancock was referred to as "the profanest man in an army of profane men". I would very much like to read some of his quotes. I assume they would be unprintable here.

John
Indeed. I have heard as much. An hour on the crackerboxes with him in another thread might set the ears bleeding!
 

Robin Lesjovitch

Sergeant
Joined
Dec 16, 2018
A conversation.
Prince John Magruder was having a dinner for high ranking officers on the Peninsula during the '62 campaign.
Some privates were detailed to set up the dining room.
After they were finished, Magruder walked onto the dining room.There sat at the table an ordinary soldier.
Magruder inquired:
"What are you doing, thir?"
":Gonna eat"
"Do you know with whom you propofe to dine?"
"Well, general, before the war I worried about things like that, but now I don't give a ****"
"Keep your theat, thir. Your intholemce ih thublime.

(Magruder had adopted certain characteristics of "upper crust" speech, ibcluding some difficulties with the consonant "s" )
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

diane

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Location
State of Jefferson
"Soldiers of the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, Ladies and Gentlemen:

"I name the soldiers first, because I love them best. I am extremely pleased to meet you here today. I love the gallant men with whom I was so intimately connected during the late war. You can readily realize what must pass through a commander's mind when called upon to meet in reunion the brave spirits who through four years of war and bloodshed fought fearlessly for a cause that they thought right, and who even when they foresaw, as we all did, that the war must soon close in disaster, and that we must all surrender, yet did not quail, but marched to victory in many battles, and fought as boldly and persistently in their last battles as they did in their first. Nor do I forget those gallant spirits who sleep coldly in death upon the many bloody battlefields of the war. I love them, too, and honor their memory. I have often been called to the side of those who have been struck down in the battle, and they would put their arms around my neck, draw me down to them and say, 'General, I have fought my last battle and will soon be gone. I want you to remember my wife and children and take care of them.' Comrades, I have remembered their wives and little ones and have taken care of them, and I want every one of you to remember them also and join with me in the labor of love.
"Comrades, through the years of bloodshed and weary marches, you were tried and true soldiers. So through the years of peace you have been good citizens; and now that we are again united under the old flag, I love it as I did in the days of my youth, and I feel sure that you also love it. Yes, I love and honor the old flag as much as those who followed it on the other side; and I am sure that I but express your feelings when I say that should our country demand our services, you would follow me to battle as eagerly under that banner as ever you followed me in our late war. It was thought by some that our social reunions were wrong, that they would be represented to the North as an evidence that we were again ready to break out into civil war. But I think that they are right and proper; we will show our countrymen by our conduct that brave soldiers are always good citizens and law-abiding and loyal people. Soldiers, I was afraid that I could not be with you today, but I could not bear the thought of not meeting with you, and I will always try to meet with you in the future. I hope that you will continue to meet from year to year, and bring your wives and children with you, and let them and the children who may come after them enjoy with you the pleasure of your reunions."

N B Forrest, Sept 21, 1877. Speech from his last reunion with his men. He died one month later.

Source: Life of Lieutenant-General Nathan Bedford Forrest, John Allen Wyeth
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Ara Oko

Private
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
"Soldiers of the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, Ladies and Gentlemen:

"I name the soldiers first, because I love them best. I am extremely pleased to meet you here today. I love the gallant men with whom I was so intimately connected during the late war. You can readily realize what must pass through a commander's mind when called upon to meet in reunion the brave spirits who through four years of war and bloodshed fought fearlessly for a cause that they thought right, and who even when they foresaw, as we all did, that the war must soon close in disaster, and that we must all surrender, yet did not quail, but marched to victory in many battles, and fought as boldly and persistently in their last battles as they did in their first. Nor do I forget those gallant spirits who sleep coldly in death upon the many bloody battlefields of the war. I love them, too, and honor their memory. I have often been called to the side of those who have been struck down in the battle, and they would put their arms around my neck, draw me down to them and say, 'General, I have fought my last battle and will soon be gone. I want you to remember my wife and children and take care of them.' Comrades, I have remembered their wives and little ones and have taken care of them, and I want every one of you to remember them also and join with me in the labor of love.
"Comrades, through the years of bloodshed and weary marches, you were tried and true soldiers. So through the years of peace you have been good citizens; and now that we are again united under the old flag, I love it as I did in the days of my youth, and I feel sure that you also love it. Yes, I love and honor the old flag as much as those who followed it on the other side; and I am sure that I but express your feelings when I say that should our country demand our services, you would follow me to battle as eagerly under that banner as ever you followed me in our late war. It was thought by some that our social reunions were wrong, that they would be represented to the North as an evidence that we were again ready to break out into civil war. But I think that they are right and proper; we will show our countrymen by our conduct that brave soldiers are always good citizens and law-abiding and loyal people. Soldiers, I was afraid that I could not be with you today, but I could not bear the thought of not meeting with you, and I will always try to meet with you in the future. I hope that you will continue to meet from year to year, and bring your wives and children with you, and let them and the children who may come after them enjoy with you the pleasure of your reunions."

N B Forrest, Sept 21, 1877. Speech from his last reunion with his men. He died one month later.

Source: Life of Lieutenant-General Nathan Bedford Forrest, John Allen Wyeth
Wow!
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top