Restricted You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument

Horrido67

Private
Joined
Sep 29, 2019

You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument

By Caroline Randall Williams

"I am a black, Southern woman, and of my immediate white male ancestors, all of them were rapists. My very existence is a relic of slavery and Jim Crow."

"It is an extraordinary truth of my life that I am biologically more than half white, and yet I have no white people in my genealogy in living memory. No. Voluntary. Whiteness. I am more than half white, and none of it was consensual. White Southern men — my ancestors — took what they wanted from women they did not love, over whom they had extraordinary power, and then failed to claim their children."

"I come from Confederates. I’ve got rebel-gray blue blood coursing my veins. My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named. So I am not an outsider who makes these demands. I am a great-great-granddaughter."

"The black people I come from were owned by the white people I come from. The white people I come from fought and died for their Lost Cause. And I ask you now, who dares to tell me to celebrate them? Who dares to ask me to accept their mounted pedestals?"

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/26/opinion/confederate-monuments-racism.html

I believe It is a good read, even though I don't entirely agree with her.
 

atlantis

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 12, 2016

You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument

By Caroline Randall Williams

"I am a black, Southern woman, and of my immediate white male ancestors, all of them were rapists. My very existence is a relic of slavery and Jim Crow."

"It is an extraordinary truth of my life that I am biologically more than half white, and yet I have no white people in my genealogy in living memory. No. Voluntary. Whiteness. I am more than half white, and none of it was consensual. White Southern men — my ancestors — took what they wanted from women they did not love, over whom they had extraordinary power, and then failed to claim their children."

"I come from Confederates. I’ve got rebel-gray blue blood coursing my veins. My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named. So I am not an outsider who makes these demands. I am a great-great-granddaughter."

"The black people I come from were owned by the white people I come from. The white people I come from fought and died for their Lost Cause. And I ask you now, who dares to tell me to celebrate them? Who dares to ask me to accept their mounted pedestals?"

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/26/opinion/confederate-monuments-racism.html

I believe It is a good read, even though I don't entirely agree with her.
Not every mixed race child was a product of rape. Men particularly married men often don't acknowledge their out of wedlock offspring. This woman is in the victimhood business. Let her live in Africa where slavery is alive and well and where mixed race people are not considered black no matter how black their skin is.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
This is nothing more than an attempt at shock and provocation, and an attempt to silence critics of her position by claiming victimhood. It is emotional blackmail, nothing more.

Using her logic here, all of us who have a Confederate ancestor are monuments to the Confederacy. Seriously, we have just as much right to claim that "status" as the author does. She has no special privileges here. She has no exclusive right to determine how or if those who fought for the Confederate States are remembered. She attempts to use the sins of a few to indict everyone those monuments memorialize, but there is no truth or justice in that approach.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
"My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named."

I checked some records on Edmund Pettus. He was a lawyer from the time he graduated college to the beginning of the Civil War.
He had no slaves in 1850 and only one in 1860 - a woman who was 60 years old. She had no children.
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
This is nothing more than an attempt at shock and provocation, and an attempt to silence critics of her position by claiming victimhood. It is emotional blackmail, nothing more.

Using her logic here, all of us who have a Confederate ancestor are monuments to the Confederacy. Seriously, we have just as much right to claim that "status" as the author does. She has no special privileges here. She has no exclusive right to determine how or if those who fought for the Confederate States are remembered. She attempts to use the sins of a few to indict everyone those monuments memorialize, but there is no truth or justice in that approach.
Well stated. :thumbsup:
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
Not every mixed race child was a product of rape. Men particularly married men often don't acknowledge their out of wedlock offspring. This woman is in the victimhood business. Let her live in Africa where slavery is alive and well and where mixed race people are not considered black no matter how black their skin is.
Well stated. :thumbsup:
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
"My great-grandfather Will was raised with the knowledge that Edmund Pettus was his father. Pettus, the storied Confederate general, the grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, the man for whom Selma’s Bloody Sunday Bridge is named."

I checked some records on Edmund Pettus. He was a lawyer from the time he graduated college to the beginning of the Civil War.
He had no slaves in 1850 and only one in 1860 - a woman who was 60 years old. She had no children.
Did he lease any slaves for any reason? Obviously the author is going from a spoken history passed down through the family. Maybe genetic testing will prove it true or false.

The genetic testing that is becoming so popular nowadays is probably going to start revealing some family secrets that some people thought were safely buried. The way that family trees get automatically populated on sites like Ancestry, and how distant cousins are revealed, is going to start exposing some of those slaveholders that thought they had got away with rape with no one knowing.
 

jcaesar

Corporal
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
The current trend with a great deal of the humanities people is to argue the theory consent could not happen even if both parties believed they were consenting in the past era if the pair existed under different power and authority levels.
 
Last edited:

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Did he lease any slaves for any reason? Obviously the author is going from a spoken history passed down through the family. Maybe genetic testing will prove it true or false.
He lived in a town with other lawyers, doctors and merchants. He wasn't rich ($0 real estate/$1000 personal estate). He had no slaves in 1850 and one in 1860. Probably a household servant.

I don't think I would call someone a 'rapist' based on a story passed down through five or six generations.

pettus.jpg


pettus1860.jpg
 
Last edited:

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
He lived in a town with other lawyers, doctors and merchants. He wasn't rich ($0 real estate/$1000 personal estate). He had no slaves in 1850 and one in 1860. Probably a household servant.

I don't think I would call someone a 'rapist' based on a story passed down through five or six generations.
What was the Pettus history before 1850? I read the father was a planter.

There a a lot of unsubstantiated stories of the war that are passed down through families, and accusations made. I'm sure some are true.
 
Last edited:

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
It appears the claim by Williams wasn't made until 2015 - the same year there was an effort to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge.
That's convenient (Williams was active in the effort to rename the bridge). Of course, the media accepted what she said without question.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
He lived in a town with other lawyers, doctors and merchants. He wasn't rich ($0 real estate/$1000 personal estate). He had no slaves in 1850 and one in 1860. Probably a household servant.

I don't think I would call someone a 'rapist' based on a story passed down through five or six generations.

View attachment 405046

View attachment 405047
Well we know hear say is good enough for some if they give it credence.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
What was the Pettus history before 1850? I read the father was a planter.

There a a lot of unsubstantiated stories of the war that are passed down through families, and accusations made. I'm sure some are true.
Yes I imagine many are unsubstantiated because they are actually false as well. As imagine quite a few are actually just postwar fabrications as well.

Note in alot of theses "stories" their relative isn't ever average Joe farmer, but always someone like a general or likewise famous. For example here, an amazing amount of people are related to Jesse James.....................as well he stayed in an amazing amount of caves or hotels......but I imagine some honestly grew up hearing that, some might just claimed it their own, but have little doubt many are false.
 
Last edited:

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Yes I imagine many are unsubstantiated because they are actually false as well. As imagine quite a few are actually just postwar fabrications as well.

Note in alot of theses "stories" their relative isn't ever average Joe farmer, but always someone like a general or likewise famous. For example here, an amazing amount of people are related to Jesse James.....................as well he stayed in an amazing amount of caves or hotels......but I imagine some honestly grew up hearing that, some might just claimed it their own, but have little doubt many are false.
I've never thought of Pettus as a famous confederate. But you're right that the average Joe slaveholder was just as likely to have fathered mixed-race children. It wasn't fame or wealth that gave slaveholders power over their female slaves, and the common slaveholders and their sons were just as likely to abuse that power.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Yes and just as likely of doing something that was rare, means it is actually rather unlikely.

And making a unsubstantiated claim about a famous person, doesn't give the unsubstantiated claim any more credibility at all, if anything it should give pause to the motive of such an unsubstantiated claim.

But in the end unsubstantiated means not supported by facts......so I take it for exactly that.
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Yes and just as likely of doing something that was rare, means it is actually rather unlikely.

And making a unsubstantiated claim about a famous person, doesn't give the unsubstantiated claim any more credibility at all, if anything it should give pause to the motive of such an unsubstantiated claim.

But in the end unsubstantiated means not supported by facts......so I take it for exactly that.
I'm sure that the descendants of Sally Hemings faced the same kind of accusations.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Point? You think one unsubstantiated story eventually being substantiated, means that all unsubstantiated stories have credence?

Actually no not at all.......
 
Top