You Know Your Having A Bad Day When You Lose Your Darkey And All Your Co. Records

ucvrelics

Colonel
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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
While researching what 2 flags were captured by the 17th Alabama Inf at Shiloh, I came across this interesting letter of 1st Sgt James Davison. Looks like he had a bad day.
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Waterloo50

Major
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Silver Patron
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Jul 7, 2015
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England
I kept the muster rolls and other records blah blah... let’s just be honest Sgt James Davidson, you messed up big style. He tries to explain himself just like I did when I forgot to hand in my coursework.
 

Lubliner

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Nov 27, 2018
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Chattanooga, Tennessee
Personal servants I should believe, could be trusted based on familiarity with their 'keeper'. The use of servants existed on both sides during the war, and as late as the evacuation of Richmond a Union general requested permission to keep a servant he had 'confiscated' while the confederates fled into Farmville, for his personal use. (Official Records).
Lubliner.
 

Cdoug96

Corporal
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Location
Michigan, United States
Don't really know what the difference is between Southerners taking a servant with him and a yankee officer using contrabands as servants.
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Contrabands were ex-slaves that were paid for their work, and also given clothes and sometimes free food. Slaves were not. Many contrabands even ended up in the USCT. That's a big difference.
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
While researching what 2 flags were captured by the 17th Alabama Inf at Shiloh, I came across this interesting letter of 1st Sgt James Davison. Looks like he had a bad day.
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A great find...can you indentify the sourcing of this letter?
This soldier enlisted with my great-grandfather ( pictured in avatar ), in Co. H, 17th Al.Infantry. Since both my maternal and paternal ancestors migrated to Monroe County, Al., in the 1820’s, I have copious data on the residents and soldiers of this county.
James Miller Davison was already in my Ancestry tree as a collateral ancestor, so was easily found. My great grandfather was also wounded at Franklin by a minie ball to the left temple, as seen in his photo. He was a scrawny little kid of 17 yrs. old. Survived, went to med college and was a physician for over 50 years there in Monroe County.
Miller Davison was younger than him. He joined at 16. Take a look at his life. Maybe his “darkey” and all his papers could disappear while he was getting shot in the leg “in the trenches in Atlanta”. Following his bio in “Notable Men of Alabama”, is his Pension application. His answers to the wounded and captured questions are telling, and the answer to # 26 is quite witty :+))...
Finally, a list of some of the officers in 17th, Co.H, written by Miller’s future father-in-law. They definitely did not fare well in the Atlanta Campaign.
Thanks for this interesting thread. Sounds like he had a lot more “bad days” to come!

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