GRAPHIC Wounded Soldiers in Civil War

Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Location
Ohio
I am just curious as to what unit Gen. Barnum commanded. I think I served with them.
Major General Alanson Barnum first served as captain of Company I, 9th N.Y. Infantry, and, consequently being promoted to major of that regiment. He received a gunshot wound to his left side at Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862, and, was left for dead. He was captured and sent to Libby Prison, then, exchanged. He recovered sufficiently to be given a commission as colonel of the 149th N.Y. He required many surgeries that allowed active service only part of the time. He did receive the Medal of Honor. In Sept. '64, following the death of Colonel David Ireland, at Atlanta, Barnum assumed command of the 3rd Brigade, which he retained for the rest of the war.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
Something that I was aware of but had never really seen before is the difference between the wounds from Civil War small arms and modern small arms. A criticism of modern rounds is that, at least with American assault rifles, the bullets are essentially hypersonic needles that do little collateral damage because they pass through a body so quickly. Unless they strike a major organ (or the head), the target can often continue on, at least for a short time, so that it requires several rounds to strike the target before they are put out of action. That was not a problem with Civil War rounds. For example,

http://cushing.med.yale.edu/gsdl/cgi-bin/library?c=civilwar&a=d&d=DcivilwarBontecouCAIC

Just look at the damage caused by the gunshot. Even though some of the damage is from treatment, it all but blew the flesh of his upper thigh and hip apart. Nowadays, the only way to get that kind of wound is from an explosive. It's all but unimaginable to attack into a line firing rounds that can do that kind of damage.

R
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Location
Ohio
Approximately 94% of Civil War combat injuries are attributed to the minie ball.
mini.jpeg
 

JWheeler331

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Location
Louisiana
I would like to contribute a photo taken of a Confederate POW with what appears to be a sabre cut to the head.View attachment 12467

It was actually a mini ball to the head. His name was James D. Faires (1846-1914)

Have also seen him listed as Farris and Faris.

His find a grave.
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GScid=1204084&GRid=43048253&


A nice link.
http://vanishedhand.blogspot.com/2011/07/james-d-farris-unbroken.html

Also this;

James D. Faris
Private, Company H, 18th S.C. Infantry, "The Catawba Light Infantry"
Enlisted at age 18 at Columbia, S.C., Aug. 27, 1864. Shot at Hatchers Run, Va., April 1, 1864. On last roll of Lincoln U.S. General Hospital, Washington, D.C. Operated on April 20, 1865. Released June 14, 1865.
Asa Faires provided this information: Received from SC Dept. of Archives and History Sept. 8, 1995. James (J. D.) Faris (FARRIS-pension, FAIRES-headstone and family Bible). Private in Company H, 18 South Carolina Infantry. Enlisted: Columbia, S.C., Aug. 27, 1864. Wounded: 1. Virginia, about Nov. 1, 1864 and admitted to Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Va., with minie ball wound in right breast. 2. Virginia, March 1865 and admitted to Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Va., March 4, 1865, with minie ball wound in face. On last roll: March 25, 1865 (Clothing receipt). Wounded and captured: (Hatchers Run) Petersburg, Va., April 1, 1865. Admitted: Lincoln General Hospital, Washington, D.C., April 8, 1865, with a fracture of the frontal bone caused by a minie ball. Fragments of bone removed April 20, 1865. (Family story was that he had an iron plate in his head. According to pension, totally blind by 1910 due to head wound at Five Forks). Oath of Allegiance signed June 12, 1865. Released from Lincoln Hospital June 14, 1865 (Aunt's copy said June 15). Resident: York District, S.C., age 18, dark complexion, light hair, hazel eyes, 5 ft. 4 in. tall.
Asa was told this regiment was part of Evans' "Tramp Brigade."
 

18thmississippi

Corporal
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Location
confederacy
photos are just a reminder the true horrors of war must we never forget these men and what they did to protect what they thought was right. also just goes to show what it means to have a backbone and standing up for what you believe in. Love very educational.

sincerely,
corp. 18thmississippi
 
Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
The after effects to the wounded were extreme when you consider the medical knowledge that existed at that time. Not that today's wounded still don't suffer, but devices available today greatly effect their quality of life
 

treebie2000

Corporal
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Location
Lima, OH
Something that I was aware of but had never really seen before is the difference between the wounds from Civil War small arms and modern small arms. A criticism of modern rounds is that, at least with American assault rifles, the bullets are essentially hypersonic needles that do little collateral damage because they pass through a body so quickly. Unless they strike a major organ (or the head), the target can often continue on, at least for a short time, so that it requires several rounds to strike the target before they are put out of action. That was not a problem with Civil War rounds. For example,

http://cushing.med.yale.edu/gsdl/cgi-bin/library?c=civilwar&a=d&d=DcivilwarBontecouCAIC

Just look at the damage caused by the gunshot. Even though some of the damage is from treatment, it all but blew the flesh of his upper thigh and hip apart. Nowadays, the only way to get that kind of wound is from an explosive. It's all but unimaginable to attack into a line firing rounds that can do that kind of damage.

R

Gotta take exception to the "...little collateral damage..."
This from physician who has treated wounds received from modern rounds from assault rifles:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/04/health/parkland-shooting-victims-ar15.html

Dr. Martin Schreiber, Oregon Health & Science University.
He was an Army reservist who served in Iraq in 2005 and in Afghanistan in 2010 and 2014.
"What makes injuries from these rifles so deadly, he said, is that the bullets travel so fast. Those from an M16 or AR-15 can depart the muzzle at a velocity of more than 3,000 feet per second....

“You will see multiple organs shattered. The exit wounds can be a foot wide.”

“I’ve seen people with entire quadrants of their abdomens destroyed.”


And this from another:
Dr. Jeffrey Kerby, the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
He was formerly an Air Force surgeon.
His take on the first gunshot wound he treated:
The soldier had been shot in the outer thigh. His first thought was that the wound did not look so bad. There was just a tiny hole where the bullet went in. Then he looked where the bullet had exited. The man’s inner thigh, he said, “was completely blown out.”

He elaborates:
The high energy bullet creates a blast wave around the bullet. And the yaw can contribute to the larger exit wound. Striking bone can also cause bone fragments that radiate outward, cutting tissue in each fragment’s path.

“Then the bullet starts tumbling, causing more and more destruction.” Even a bullet that misses bone can result in surprising damage; as the blast wave travels through the body, it pushes tissues and organs aside in a temporary cavity larger than the bullet itself. They bounce back once the bullet passes. Organs are damaged, blood vessels rip and many victims bleed to death before they reach a hospital.


Hardly the work of "hypersonic needles that do little collateral damage because they pass through a body so quickly".
I'm not trying to downplay or minimize the significance of the damage caused by Civil War ordinance, but modern weaponry reeks as much or more havoc on the human body as any ever have.
And we still produce men and women who volunteer to face those weapons...on our behalf.
 

Yankeedave

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Location
Colorado
Not to digress the thread further but a friend of mine saw a .556 put a hole in a man big enough to put your arm thru.
 

Belle Montgomery

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Location
44022
I think of their lives post-war. How were the disabled able to make a living when most work back then was physical labor? How many suffered for years or decades and how many became drug addicts trying to ease their agony?
Still, I see a complete absence of self-pity in their faces. Extraordinary men- and boys.
Yes they were Extraordinary men- and boys!
 
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