Would You Visit a Plantation?

Would You Visit a Plantation?

  • Yes

    Votes: 79 97.5%
  • No

    Votes: 2 2.5%

  • Total voters
    81

Zella

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 23, 2018
When I visited the Hermitage, I recall that the exhibit hall showcases Jackson's treatment of African Americans and Native Americans in
an objective manner. Come to think of it, a lot of historic homes owned by iconic American figures (e.g., Monticello) have treated these subjects with the attention they deserve.
They also highlight the slave cabins at Rowan Oak, even though the home's historical attraction is ostensibly more modern--as the home William Faulkner lived in from 1930-1962--but the house dates from the 1840s, and I appreciated that they didn't ignore that aspect of the history.
 

jackt62

Captain
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
The History Channel is doing a great series on George Washington right now. It debuted last night and will continue tonight and Tuesday night. Not the best place for this post, but I think a lot of folks participating in this thread would really enjoy it. Jeff Daniels, our very own General Chamberlain, is narrating.

I DVR'd it. Looking forward to viewing.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Although I have visited plantations, I only did so as a group with the the exception of Arlington which I saw when I visited Arlington Cemetery. I do not think my wife and I would go out of our way to visit a plantation on our own. Perhaps we might if the plantation was part of a battlefield. I did go in the house at the Battle of Franklin, but only the house at the site of the main battle.
 

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Good question. Actually, there are a number of existing plantations in the Charleston region that are in good condition and open to visitors. But the best answer is that the route of Sherman's two main columns, led by Slocum and Howard did not go near Charleston. After leaving Savannah, GA, the line of advance was inland through Columbia, and Cheraw South Carolina, and on to Fayettville, NC.
Is there any reason why he selected Columbia and avoided Charleston,the city of Rebellion,He had the force necessary to capture it/the Navy by that time had turned the city into a town of shambles ,Was there any Confederate force present around the city.Could it be that Johnson and his army was his objective . since it was the only major force in that area and with the ANV surrender .this would be the last force to bring a end to the war,Did Johnson or Davis make the move to distract Sherman away from Charleston ?If the port was closed by the blockade what purpose did it serve?What better prize., next to Atlanta .,could Sherman have given to Lincoln and the Northern people?All he had to do was to take the bridge and he would have been there in no more than two or three hours!
 

jackt62

Captain
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
Is there any reason why he selected Columbia and avoided Charleston,the city of Rebellion,He had the force necessary to capture it/the Navy by that time had turned the city into a town of shambles ,Was there any Confederate force present around the city.Could it be that Johnson and his army was his objective . since it was the only major force in that area and with the ANV surrender .this would be the last force to bring a end to the war,Did Johnson or Davis make the move to distract Sherman away from Charleston ?If the port was closed by the blockade what purpose did it serve?What better prize., next to Atlanta .,could Sherman have given to Lincoln and the Northern people?All he had to do was to take the bridge and he would have been there in no more than two or three hours!

A few various reasons. With the closure of Wilmington port in January 1865, Charleston was no longer considered a military objective by early 1865. It had already suffered grievous bombardment from federal forces in 1863. In contrast, the capitol city Columbia, which had hardly been touched offered a more inviting target for retribution. Additionally, Sherman's ultimate goal, to link up with Grant's forces in Virginia, meant that the central route through South Carolina was more direct. In any case, the Confederate garrison in Charleston evacuated the city on February 15, 1865, which finally surrendered to federal forces a few days later.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Late on replying. I have and will continue to visit plantations. My husband and I enjoy all old homes and estates. We have been to many across the country. The architecture and history are so interesting. Also enjoy the furniture of the time. I will state that the kitchens are of interest. I love when they have demonstrations of preparing food in them.
 

chuckh

Cadet
Joined
Jan 20, 2020
Shirley Plantation on the James River in Virginia; R E Lee when a boy, was given a pen knife for Christmas and carved out an acorn from the mantel piece when no one was looking. The acorn is still missing........They used to hold a wonderful reenactment there.View attachment 346972
I remember too, during the fighting around Richmond they took in a number of wounded Union soldiers. They had a letter signed by Gen Grant, granting the plantation protection from being burn by Union troops because of their efforts. The first thing my wife noticed as we made our way up the long gravel walkway toward the house was the large pineapple on the peak of the roof. She loved pineapples.
 

A. Roy

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Location
Raleigh, North Carolina
I remember too, during the fighting around Richmond they took in a number of wounded Union soldiers. They had a letter signed by Gen Grant, granting the plantation protection from being burn by Union troops because of their efforts. The first thing my wife noticed as we made our way up the long gravel walkway toward the house was the large pineapple on the peak of the roof. She loved pineapples.

The pineapple is known as a symbol of hospitality -- maybe you already knew that!

Roy B.
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
The History Channel is doing a great series on George Washington right now. It debuted last night and will continue tonight and Tuesday night. Not the best place for this post, but I think a lot of folks participating in this thread would really enjoy it. Jeff Daniels, our very own General Chamberlain, is narrating.
I really liked it. I thought it was well done. I couldn't help but feel sorry for him at the end, only getting a couple years of retirement. He deserved more in my opinion. I'm convinced that without his resolve, wisdom, & humility, we wouldn't have gained independence. At least not then. This series peeked into the heart of his character so to speak. Showed how tough he was. Showed his incredible strength, & mental fortitude.

My favorite one so far was, Sons of Liberty. I wanna say, it was a 3 part mini series also. Seems like it was 4 or 5 years ago.
 

Grant's Tomb

Private
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Back in the summer of 2000 while staying at great-aunt and uncle's beach house on Topsail Island, North Carolina, my parents and I took a little side trip down to Charleston and visited Fort Sumter. We stayed overnight in a B&B that was on the grounds of Middleton Place Plantation on the Ashley River and the next day before we left, we took a walk around the gardens of Magnolia Place. On our way back home from that same trip we stopped to visit George Washington's Mount Vernon
 

Grant's Tomb

Private
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
The History Channel is doing a great series on George Washington right now. It debuted last night and will continue tonight and Tuesday night. Not the best place for this post, but I think a lot of folks participating in this thread would really enjoy it. Jeff Daniels, our very own General Chamberlain, is narrating.
Have you ever seen the film about Washington crossing the Delaware? Jeff Daniels portrayed Washington in that film
 

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